145

Is there a way to control browser scrolling with JavaScript/jQuery?

When I scroll my page half way down, then trigger a reload, I want the page to go pack to the top, but instead it tries to find the last scroll position. So I did this:

$('document').ready(function() {
   $(window).scrollTop(0);
});

But no luck.

EDIT:

So both your answers worked when I call them after the page loads-Thanks. However, if I just do a refresh on the page, looks like the browser calculates and scrolls to its old scroll position AFTER the .ready event (I tested the body onload() function too).

So the follow up is, is there a way to PREVENT the browser scrolling to its past position, or to re-scroll to the top AFTER it does its thing?

  • 1
    What happens when you do it from $(window).load() ? – mpdonadio Nov 18 '10 at 1:47
  • 2
    @MPD- Excellent idea! ... but just tried it and the scroll adjustment still happens after that. Thanks for the tip though, it actually helps with another question of mine: stackoverflow.com/questions/4210829/…. If you want to answer that one I'll give you some ups. – Yarin Nov 18 '10 at 2:03

25 Answers 25

295

Cross-browser, pure JavaScript solution:

document.body.scrollTop = document.documentElement.scrollTop = 0;
  • 3
    Since you're using jQuery, you could try this: $(window).one("scroll",function() { /* the code from my answer here */ }); – Niet the Dark Absol Mar 13 '13 at 16:51
  • To make this work on my IE/Chrome/FF cross-browsers, I must combine Niet Dark Absol answer and user113716 answer (using timeout). – Panini Luncher Nov 11 '15 at 19:02
  • Did not work on CentOS 6.7 using FF 45.1.0. I wrapped it in a document.ready just to be sure. – Brandon Elliott May 20 '16 at 3:15
  • Just want to point out that from my testing (on modern/2018 versions of chrome included) that this solution works more reliably – mattLummus Dec 17 '18 at 18:27
84
+50

You almost got it - you need to set the scrollTop on body, not window:

$(function() {
   $('body').scrollTop(0);
});

EDIT:

Maybe you can add a blank anchor to the top of the page:

$(function() {
   $('<a name="top"/>').insertBefore($('body').children().eq(0));
   window.location.hash = 'top';
});
  • Thanks much Jacob- can you see my edits above – Yarin Nov 18 '10 at 1:44
  • thanks, was thinking about that, will try that too – Yarin Nov 18 '10 at 1:53
  • 2
    Tried this today and didn't work in FF16. Using pure JS, seen lower on this page, instead: document.body.scrollTop = document.documentElement.scrollTop = 0; – Gigi2m02 Oct 16 '12 at 12:24
  • 2
    The above code will work properly in Modern browsers like FF,Chrome but it will not work in IE8 and below try to add both 'html','body' as the modern browsers will scroll based on body but IE8 and below will only scroll with 'html','body' – Rajesh May 29 '14 at 9:58
16

Is there a way to PREVENT the browser scrolling to its past position, or to re-scroll to the top AFTER it does its thing?

The following jquery solution works for me:

$(window).unload(function() {
    $('body').scrollTop(0);
});
  • yea scroll to top before the refresh – Morgan T. May 26 '11 at 20:38
  • 1
    this doesn't work in firefox – kiransh Dec 31 '12 at 10:43
  • Perfect for Safari! – t.h3ads Apr 20 '14 at 22:14
  • Not completely cross browser, but still works for most. When coupled with some of the other answers this is a good addition – Brad Decker Aug 11 '15 at 15:37
15

Here's a pure JavaScript animated scroll version for no-jQuery'ers :D

var stepTime = 20;
var docBody = document.body;
var focElem = document.documentElement;

var scrollAnimationStep = function (initPos, stepAmount) {
    var newPos = initPos - stepAmount > 0 ? initPos - stepAmount : 0;

    docBody.scrollTop = focElem.scrollTop = newPos;

    newPos && setTimeout(function () {
        scrollAnimationStep(newPos, stepAmount);
    }, stepTime);
}

var scrollTopAnimated = function (speed) {
    var topOffset = docBody.scrollTop || focElem.scrollTop;
    var stepAmount = topOffset;

    speed && (stepAmount = (topOffset * stepTime)/speed);

    scrollAnimationStep(topOffset, stepAmount);
};

And then:

<button onclick="scrollTopAnimated(1000)">Scroll Top</button>
  • 1
    Cool. Though, I would prefer requestAnimationStep instead of setTimeout. Also it does not answer OP's question. – Quentin Roy Jun 3 '16 at 8:13
  • implemented this in Angular. works like a charm. Thanks – Ahmad Nov 2 '17 at 8:19
10

UPDATE

Going to top of the page with a scroll effect is a bit more easier in javascript now with:

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/Window/scroll

window.scroll({
 top: 0, 
 left: 0, 
 behavior: 'smooth' 
});

CAUTION

We have been using this in our more recent projects, but I just checked the mozilla doc right now while updating my answer and I believe it has been updated. Right now the method is window.scroll(x-coord, y-coord) and does not mention or show examples that use the object parameter where you can set the behavior to smooth. I just tried the code and it still works in chrome and firefox and the object parameter is still in the spec.

So use this with caution or you can use this Polyfill. Aside from scrolling to the top, this polyfill also handles other methods: window.scrollBy, element.scrollIntoView, etc.


OLD ANSWER

This is our vanilla javascript implementation. It has a simple easing effect so that the user doesn't get shocked after clicking the To Top button.

Its very small and gets even smaller when minified. Devs looking for an alternative to the jquery method but want the same results can try this.

JS

document.querySelector("#to-top").addEventListener("click", function(){

    var toTopInterval = setInterval(function(){

        var supportedScrollTop = document.body.scrollTop > 0 ? document.body : document.documentElement;

        if (supportedScrollTop.scrollTop > 0) {
            supportedScrollTop.scrollTop = supportedScrollTop.scrollTop - 50;
        }

        if (supportedScrollTop.scrollTop < 1) {
            clearInterval(toTopInterval);
        }

    }, 10);

},false);

HTML

<button id="to-top">To Top</button>

Cheers!

8

This works for me:

window.onload = function() {
    // short timeout
    setTimeout(function() {
        $(document.body).scrollTop(0);
    }, 15);
};

Uses a short setTimeout inside the onload to give the browser a chance to do the scroll.

  • setTimeout did the trick! – Nima Apr 13 '15 at 1:49
  • To make this work on my IE/Chrome/FF cross-browsers, I must combine Niet Dark Absol answer and user113716 answer (using timeout). – Panini Luncher Nov 11 '15 at 19:02
  • @Panini: your suggestion works for me on Chrome/FF, but not IE11. – EML Feb 15 '16 at 22:48
  • Did not work on CentOS 6.7 using FF 45.1.0. – Brandon Elliott May 20 '16 at 3:16
8

You can use with jQuery

jQuery(window).load(function(){

    jQuery("html,body").animate({scrollTop: 100}, 1000);

});
  • This is basically what I FINALLY found to work on CentOS 6.7 using FF 45.1.0. My slightly different version (wrapped in a window load function) is: $("html, body").animate({ scrollTop: 0 }, 1); – Brandon Elliott May 20 '16 at 3:18
6

Use the following function

window.scrollTo(xpos, ypos)

Here xpos is Required. The coordinate to scroll to, along the x-axis (horizontal), in pixels

ypos is also Required. The coordinate to scroll to, along the y-axis (vertical), in pixels

5
$(function() {
    // the element inside of which we want to scroll
        var $elem = $('#content');

        // show the buttons
    $('#nav_up').fadeIn('slow');
    $('#nav_down').fadeIn('slow');  

        // whenever we scroll fade out both buttons
    $(window).bind('scrollstart', function(){
        $('#nav_up,#nav_down').stop().animate({'opacity':'0.2'});
    });
        // ... and whenever we stop scrolling fade in both buttons
    $(window).bind('scrollstop', function(){
        $('#nav_up,#nav_down').stop().animate({'opacity':'1'});
    });

        // clicking the "down" button will make the page scroll to the $elem's height
    $('#nav_down').click(
        function (e) {
            $('html, body').animate({scrollTop: $elem.height()}, 800);
        }
    );
        // clicking the "up" button will make the page scroll to the top of the page
    $('#nav_up').click(
        function (e) {
            $('html, body').animate({scrollTop: '0px'}, 800);
        }
    );
 });

Use This

  • Nice! Works fine with animation! – Sakthivel May 8 '15 at 11:00
4

The following code works in Firefox, Chrome and Safari, but I was unable to test this in Internet Explorer. Can someone test it, and then edit my answer or comment on it?

$(document).scrollTop(0);
4

My pure (animated) Javascript solution:

function gototop() {
    if (window.scrollY>0) {
        window.scrollTo(0,window.scrollY-20)
        setTimeout("gototop()",10)
    }
}

Explanation:

window.scrollY is a variable maintained by the browser of the amount of pixels from the top that the window has been scrolled by.

window.scrollTo(x,y) is a function that scrolls the window a specific amount of pixels on the x axis and on the y axis.

Thus, window.scrollTo(0,window.scrollY-20) moves the page 20 pixels towards the top.

The setTimeout calls the function again in 10 milliseconds so that we can then move it another 20 pixels (animated), and the if statement checks if we still need to scroll.

3

Why don't you just use some reference element at the very beginning of your html file, like

<div id="top"></div>

and then, when the page loads, simply do

$(document).ready(function(){

    top.location.href = '#top';

});

If the browser scrolls after this function fires, you simply do

$(window).load(function(){

    top.location.href = '#top';

});
  • 3
    this worked for me, but it adds the #top in the url, can you please tell me how can i avoid this, but at the same time, not compromising with the functionality – Abbas Nov 29 '12 at 16:49
3

Cross-browser scroll to top:

        if($('body').scrollTop()>0){
            $('body').scrollTop(0);         //Chrome,Safari
        }else{
            if($('html').scrollTop()>0){    //IE, FF
                $('html').scrollTop(0);
            }
        } 

Cross-browser scroll to an element with id = div_id:

        if($('body').scrollTop()>$('#div_id').offset().top){
            $('body').scrollTop($('#div_id').offset().top);         //Chrome,Safari
        }else{
            if($('html').scrollTop()>$('#div_id').offset().top){    //IE, FF
                $('html').scrollTop($('#div_id').offset().top);
            }
        } 
2

To answer your edited-in question, you could register the onscroll handler like so:

document.documentElement.onscroll = document.body.onscroll = function() {
    this.scrollTop = 0;
    this.onscroll = null;
}

This will make it so that the first attempt at scrolling (which is likely the automatic one done by the browser) will be effectively cancelled.

  • Nice solution- I'll give it a try – Yarin Nov 18 '10 at 1:50
2

If you're in quircks mode (thanks @Niet the Dark Absol):

document.body.scrollTop = document.documentElement.scrollTop = 0;

If you're in strict mode:

document.documentElement.scrollTop = 0;

No need for jQuery here.

  • Did not work on CentOS 6.7 using FF 45.1.0 – Brandon Elliott May 20 '16 at 3:17
2

This is working:

jQuery(document).ready(function() {
     jQuery("html").animate({ scrollTop: 0 }, "fast");
});
  • why the -1? This solution works as @chand does – Alwin Kesler Jan 7 '16 at 20:15
2

In my case body didn't worked:

$('body').scrollTop(0);

But HTML worked:

$('html').scrollTop(0);
  • Add both 'html','body' as the modern browsers FF,Chrome will scroll based on body but IE8 and below will only scroll with 'html','body' – Rajesh May 29 '14 at 10:01
2

Combination of these two helped me. None of the other answers helped me since i had a sidenav that was not scrolling.

 setTimeout(function () {
        window.scroll({
                        top: 0,
                        left: 0,
                        behavior: 'smooth'
                    });

    document.body.scrollTop = document.documentElement.scrollTop = 0;

}, 15);
1
var totop = $('#totop');
totop.click(function(){
 $('html, body').stop(true,true).animate({scrollTop:0}, 1000);
 return false;
});

$(window).scroll(function(){
 if ($(this).scrollTop() > 100){ 
  totop.fadeIn();
 }else{
  totop.fadeOut();
 }
});

<img id="totop" src="img/arrow_up.png" title="Click to go Up" style="display:none;position:fixed;bottom:10px;right:10px;cursor:pointer;cursor:hand;"/>
1

without animation, just scroll(0, 0) (vanilla JS)

1

If anyone is using angular and material design with sidenav. This will send you to to the top of the page:

let ele = document.getElementsByClassName('md-sidenav-content');
    let eleArray = <Element[]>Array.prototype.slice.call(ele);
    eleArray.map( val => {
        val.scrollTop = document.documentElement.scrollTop = 0;
    });
0

Seeint the hash should do the job. If you have a header, you can use

window.location.href = "#headerid";

otherwise, the # alone will work

window.location.href = "#";

And as it get written into the url, it'll stay if you refresh.

In fact, you don't event need JavaScript for that if you want to do it on an onclick event, you should just put a link arround you element and give it # as href.

  • Btw, window.location isn't part of the tree so there is now use to wait for onload. – xavierm02 May 27 '11 at 21:01
0

First add a blank anchor tag to the place where you want to go

<a href="#topAnchor"></a> 

Now add a function in header section

 function GoToTop() {
            var urllocation = location.href;
            if (urllocation.indexOf("#topAnchor") > -1) {
                window.location.hash = "topAnchor";
            } else {
                return false;
            }
        }

finally add an onload event to the body tag

<body onload="GoToTop()">
0

A generic version that works for any X and Y value, and is the same as the window.scrollTo api, just with the addition of scrollDuration.

*A generic version matching the window.scrollTo browser api**

function smoothScrollTo(x, y, scrollDuration) {
    x = Math.abs(x || 0);
    y = Math.abs(y || 0);
    scrollDuration = scrollDuration || 1500;

    var currentScrollY = window.scrollY,
        currentScrollX = window.scrollX,
        dirY = y > currentScrollY ? 1 : -1,
        dirX = x > currentScrollX ? 1 : -1,
        tick = 16.6667, // 1000 / 60
        scrollStep = Math.PI / ( scrollDuration / tick ),
        cosParameterY = currentScrollY / 2,
        cosParameterX = currentScrollX / 2,
        scrollCount = 0,
        scrollMargin;

    function step() {        
        scrollCount = scrollCount + 1;  

        if ( window.scrollX !== x ) {
            scrollMargin = cosParameterX + dirX * cosParameterX * Math.cos( scrollCount * scrollStep );
            window.scrollTo( 0, ( currentScrollX - scrollMargin ) );
        } 

        if ( window.scrollY !== y ) {
            scrollMargin = cosParameterY + dirY * cosParameterY * Math.cos( scrollCount * scrollStep );
            window.scrollTo( 0, ( currentScrollY - scrollMargin ) );
        } 

        if (window.scrollX !== x || window.scrollY !== y) {
            requestAnimationFrame(step);
        }
    }

    step();
}
-1
 <script>
  sessionStorage.scrollDirection = 1;//create a session variable 
  var pageScroll = function() {
  window.scrollBy ({
   top: sessionStorage.scrollDirection,
   left: 0,
   behavior: 'smooth'
   });
   if($(window).scrollTop() + $(window).height() > $(document).height() - 1)
  {    
    sessionStorage.scrollDirection= Number(sessionStorage.scrollDirection )-300;
    setTimeout(pageScroll,50);//
   }
   else{
   sessionStorage.scrollDirection=Number(sessionStorage.scrollDirection )+1
   setTimeout(pageScroll,300); 
  }
};
pageScroll();
</script>
  • 1
    Welcome to stackoverflow. In addition to the code you've provided, try to give some explanation on why and how this fixes the issue. – jtate Feb 22 at 21:46

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