44

I have a few running docker containers created by executing docker-compose up.

Is there any way to get the exact file path of the corresponding docker-compose.yml file used to start these containers, just by inspecting the running containers?

As far as I can see, docker inspect CONTAINER_NAME does not provide this information, nor does docker-compose provide a method to get compose-related information from a running container.

What I'd like to do in a script:

  • list certain running containers on a docker host
  • get the corresponding docker-compose.yml file locations
  • use docker-compose to restart all containers of the corresponding docker-compose projects at once
23

The answer to this question seems to have changed with new versions of docker-compose. There is a label "com.docker.compose.project.working_dir": "/var/opt/docker", that points to the directory where I started docker-compose. I have not checked if that is pwd or the actual location of the docker-compose.yml file.

This got me interesting information about docker-compose:

samuel@vmhost1:~$ docker inspect fc440a1afbaa | grep com.docker.compose
                "com.docker.compose.config-hash": "89069285a4783b79b421ea84f2b652becbdee148fbad095a6d9d85aab67ececc",
                "com.docker.compose.container-number": "1",
                "com.docker.compose.oneoff": "False",
                "com.docker.compose.project": "docker",
                "com.docker.compose.project.config_files": "docker-compose.yml",
                "com.docker.compose.project.working_dir": "/var/opt/docker",
                "com.docker.compose.service": "jenkins",
                "com.docker.compose.version": "1.25.0"
samuel@vmhost1:~$ 

I'm running docker-compose.yml configuration version 3.6

6
  • 2
    The working_dir is the context specified in the compose file, it doesn't point to location of compose file
    – Guerrilla
    Sep 23 '20 at 12:51
  • 1
    it worked great, thanks
    – Agam Banga
    Dec 9 '20 at 2:32
  • 1
    this should be the accepted answer
    – zooglash
    Jun 20 at 14:19
  • @Guerrilla: What do you mean?
    – at54321
    Jul 8 at 20:39
  • @at54321 The context and the compose file are not the same thing. The context can be located in a different location to the compose file
    – Guerrilla
    Jul 8 at 21:05
10

It is not currently possible.

As an alternative might find the following helpful:

  • Use docker ps -a | grep <certain_container>
  • Use locate docker-compose.yml and find the one that you want
  • Use docker-compose restart (do docker-compose to see option)
2

As far as I can see, docker inspect CONTAINER_NAME does not provide this information, nor does docker-compose provide a method to get compose-related information from a running container.

From an already running container that you do not control, the information is not there. You can infer the location using bind mount directories if the container creates any host mounts to relative directories. Otherwise, it's possible to deploy containers without compose, and it's possible to use compose without a compose file on the filesystem (piped via stdin), and compose does not store these details on running containers for you.


What I'd like to do in a script:

  • list certain running containers on a docker host
  • get the corresponding docker-compose.yml file locations
  • use docker-compose to restart all containers of the corresponding docker-compose projects at once

If you just want to run a restart on all containers in the same project, you don't need the first two steps, or even docker-compose. Instead, you can run:

docker ps --filter "label=com.docker.compose.project=${your_compose_project}" -q \
| xargs docker restart

Which uses a label docker-compose adds to each project it deploys.


If you want to proactively store the compose file location for later use, you can inject that as a label in your compose file:

version: '2'
services:
  test:
    image: busybox
    command: tail -f /dev/null
    labels:
      COMPOSE_PATH: ${PWD} # many Linux shells define the PWD variable

If your shell does not set a ${PWD} environment variable, you can start compose with:

PWD=$(pwd) docker-compose up -d

Then you can later inspect containers for this label's value with:

docker inspect --format '{{.Config.Labels.COMPOSE_PATH}}' ${your_container_id}

And you can chain a filter and inspect command together to find the path for a specific project:

docker ps --filter "label=com.docker.compose.project=${your_compose_project}" -q \
| xargs docker inspect --format '{{.Config.Labels.COMPOSE_PATH}}'
2
  • Bad idea. With pwd you can never user docker-compose -f ...
    – A.B.
    Sep 25 '19 at 10:49
  • @A.B. the point of the pwd section was that you can inject a label into your containers with the details you want later. If you override the compose file, inject that as a label that you manage.
    – BMitch
    Sep 25 '19 at 11:06
0

you know, your question turns to be a useful answer to the same issue I have. I used docker inspect <containerID> and then it gave me the location that I should look into. specifically in these lines:

HostConfig": {
            "Binds": [
....
...
],

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.