41

I'm trying to replace my Handler method with RxJava.
My requirement:

I want to call the method getTransactionDetails() only after 5 seconds.

This my working code using Handler:

new Handler().postDelayed(new Runnable() {
      @Override
      public void run() {
        getTransactionDetails();
      }
    }, 5000); 

Rx java code - it's not working:

Observable.empty().delay(5000, TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS)
        .subscribeOn(Schedulers.io())
        .observeOn(AndroidSchedulers.mainThread())
        .doOnNext(o -> getTransactionDetails())
        .subscribe();
2
85

This is how I would do it:

    Completable.timer(5, TimeUnit.SECONDS, AndroidSchedulers.mainThread())
        .subscribe(this::getTransactionDetails);

A Completable represents a deferred computation with no value but an indication for completion or exception. The static method call timer() returns a Completable that signals completion after the specified time period has elapsed, and the subscribe() call will mean that the method getTransactionDetails() will be called on the current object when the timer fires. By supplying a Scheduler as the last argument to Completable.timer() you control which thread is used to execute getTransactionDetails().

0
59

doOnNext() is for side effects. It could be use for example for logging purpose, because logging doesn't alter the flow of data. But you want to pass down the result of getTransactionDetails(), so you should use map instead.

Second, Observable.empty() create an Observable that just propagate the finish/dispose message, it trigger neither doOnNext() neither map(). You could fix this using Observable.just() instead but a more idiomatic way would be to use Observable.timer():

Observable.timer(5000, TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS)
        .map(o -> getTransactionDetails())
        .observeOn(AndroidSchedulers.mainThread())
        .subscribe( ... );

A final note on Schedulers. Observable.timer() and delay() are executed on the computation scheduler by default so you don't need to call .subscribeOn(Schedulers.io()) to execute getTransactionDetails() outside of main thread. Observable.timer() and delay() could take a Scheduler as a parameter if you want to control this. So you need to call .observeOn(AndroidSchedulers.mainThread()) if you want to use getTransactionDetails() result on UI thread. Every operator after observeOn() is executed on the defined Scheduler, so you have to put observeOn() after computation.

Edit: This is of course if you care about the result of getTransactionDetails(). If not, see Clyde answer.

4
  • 1
    The map should probably be before the observeOn That way it is run on the RxComputation thread rather than the main thread.
    – skeeve
    Mar 30 '18 at 17:01
  • @GeoffreyMarizy how can i call this daily on 12:00 am?
    – Nouman Ch
    Aug 29 '18 at 7:22
  • As for I know, RxJava dosn't support this use-case. Which make sense, since Rx is no more than a (supercharged) observer pattern. Aug 29 '18 at 8:51
  • what really helped me understand me my problem was the part about schedulers; upvoted.
    – Antek
    Feb 6 '20 at 11:01
13
Observable
     .timer( 5000, TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS )
     .subscribeOn(Schedulers.io())
     .map(o -> getTransactionDetails() )
     .subscribe();

you dont need observeOn because subscribe empty. use timer it will be more correct way

1
  • Why do you execute the function in .map and not in .subscribe()? Apr 9 '18 at 10:40
10

It's not working, because delay() needs something to be emitted, but empty() actually emits nothing.

Instead, you should use Observable.timer().

1
  • 4
    Alternatively Completable.complete().delay(...)
    – Kiskae
    Feb 8 '17 at 22:43
4

Delay subscription already defined. Your example can be implemented in this way:

getTransactionDetails().delaySubscription(5000, TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS)
2

Try this

Observable.just(true).delay(5000, TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS)
    .subscribeOn(Schedulers.io())
    .observeOn(AndroidSchedulers.mainThread())
    .map(o -> getTransactionDetails())
    .subscribe();
2

If you want a disposable that can be used with the view then use a Completable Completable returns an Object which terminates as soon as one of the source Completables terminates (normally or with an error) and cancels all other Completables.

Eg :

Completable.timer(5, TimeUnit.SECONDS, AndroidSchedulers.mainThread())
            .subscribe(() -> {
                // code after delay here
            });

If you want for a service to get complete i would recommend a Subscription

Eg :

observable.timer(5000, TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS)
    .map(o -> {
              // your code after delay here
              })
    .observeOn(AndroidSchedulers.mainThread())
    .subscribe( ()-<{
                   // enter the service here
                } );

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