0

I was wondering if someone could tell me the pythonic way to check out the following.

I have a 6 bit binary number and want to check with its decimal values. Using mathematical function is one way but still it would require that I write around 2**6 if constructs.

So I wanted to know if there's an easier statement to write it.

Also assume that lets say it's not binary then what's the better way to check for 2**6 values in python.

if(a==1):
    ....
else:
    if(a==2)
.....

One way is saving it in a list and checking it with the indexes but still that would require that many if-else I guess.....

Thanks ....

14
  • 2
    Do those ..... have anything in common?
    – kennytm
    Nov 18, 2010 at 7:15
  • it just means that writing the same thing again and again for the rest of the values a==3 , a==4 and so on....
    – user506710
    Nov 18, 2010 at 7:16
  • 1
    What's a "binary number"? A number is a number, "binary" in this context is simply a representation you use when converting it to a string.
    – detly
    Nov 18, 2010 at 7:16
  • Also, what is a? Where does it come from? What is its type? How is it used?
    – detly
    Nov 18, 2010 at 7:17
  • The first question is, what will you do for each of those different cases? Will you do one thing if a==3 and something else if a==4? If you really need to do 2**6 different things, then maybe you do need the if construct .... but I can't quite believe that. Maybe you could provide a little more context?
    – aptwebapps
    Nov 18, 2010 at 7:24

5 Answers 5

4

Use a dictionary mapping values into outcomes (which can be functions in Python).

For example:

d = {}
d[0] = ....
d[1] = ....
d[2] = ....

outcome = d[a]

Naturally, how this works depends on your ...., but this construct can be very flexible. The most important feature of this approach is that this dictionary can be populated programmatically, and you don't need to write a lot of manual assignments. It's of course also much more efficient than going over many values with nested if statements (or elsif)

1
  • It's worth pointing out that functions and other callables are first class objects in Python. Thus the values you assign to your dictionary keys can be functions or tuples of functions and argument or partial argument lists or curries, etc.
    – Jim Dennis
    Nov 18, 2010 at 8:51
2

To add to the responses of the others, you should read about the recommended Python style in PEP 8.

With your if version, the brackets are undesirable and spacing is desirable:

if a == 1:
    pass
elif a == 2:
    pass
elif a == 3:
    pass
else:
    pass
0

I would use a decorator to map into a dictionary based dispatch:

_dispatch_table = {}

def dispatch_on(*values):
    def dec(f):
        _dispatch_table.update((v, f) for v in values)
        return f
    return dec

@dispatch_on(0, 2, 47)
def one():
    foo()
    bar()

@dispatch_on(2, 23, 89)
def two():
    bar()
    baz()

x = some_number
_dispatch_table[x]()    
-1

Personally I prefer a if/elif if I am understanding your ...

so your:

if(a==1):
    ....
else:
    if(a==2)
.....

Becomes this if you use if elif ladder:

if a==1:
    ....
elif a==2:
    .....
else:
    default

You can also use Python's version of a conditional expression for simple ladders:

def one():
   print("option 1 it is\n")

def two():
   print("option 2 it is\n")

def three():
   print("not one or two\n")

one() if a==1 else two() if a==2 else three()

Or even dictionaries:

def one():
   print("option 1 it is\n")

def two():
   print("option 2 it is\n")

def three():
   print("not one or two\n")

options = {1:one,
           2:two,
           3:three,
}

options[2]()

There is a great discussion on Python forms of switch-case in this SO post.

-3

Based on the somewhat vague information in the question and what I've been able to gather from the OP's comments, here's my guess:

def func1(): pass
def func2(): pass
def func3(): pass
#     ...
def func62(): pass
def func63(): pass

if 0 < a < 64:
    globals()['func'+str(a)]()
else:
    print 'a is out of range'
6
  • 1
    A dictionary-based dispatch table is a much better solution than this, particularly if some of the cases have shared behavior. Nov 18, 2010 at 19:14
  • @Russell Borogove: I think that's an unfair assessment. FWIW, this is a dictionary-based dispatch and represents a low-cost solution what little is know intially. I don't think the OP yet knows if there's any "shared behavior". Even if it turns out later there is some, this approach can easily accommodate it at least a couple of different ways just like a separate dispatch dictionary or list could. Initially just doing the "simplest thing that could possibly work" is a completely valid strategy to proceed with without attempting to optimize code you haven't even written yet.
    – martineau
    Nov 18, 2010 at 19:50
  • 1
    It would be trivial, and just as simple, to convert this to use a designated dict instead of dumping it all in the global namespace.
    – detly
    Nov 18, 2010 at 22:45
  • @detly: Likewise for converting it to use one later IF necessary and/or worth the effort. If everything is put its own module and its built-in dict used as shown, there's no clear advantage to an explicit one...just extra effort and work.
    – martineau
    Nov 19, 2010 at 2:55
  • @martineau - it's not "likewise" trivial, because it will be the OP doing it, not you, and they clearly don't know how.
    – detly
    Nov 19, 2010 at 4:20

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