46

I know that in VueJS I can loop through an array:

<span v-for="(element, index) in list">{{ element }}</span>

But what if I wanted a list that is comma separated? For example, if list = ["alice", "bob", "chuck"], then the above would output:

<span>alice</span><span>bob</span><span>chuck</span>

What I want, though, is:

<span>alice</span>, <span>bob</span>, <span>chuck</span>

Is this possible?

13 Answers 13

57

If all you care about is comma separation, use Javascript's built-in join method:

{{ list.join(', ') }}
2
  • This is a great solution. I was able to use it for 1 level arrays. I did have to find another alternative for arrays of objects. Jun 20, 2018 at 22:01
  • Exactly what I was looking for, because I need it inside select <option> tag. <option v-for="(role, rolekey) in roles" :value="rolekey" >{{role.roleName}} {{ role.accesspermissions.join(', ') }}</option>
    – Christoph
    May 29, 2019 at 9:18
46

You can use conditional rendering to hide last , like following:

var demo = new Vue({
  el: '#demo',
  data: function() {
    return {
      lists: ['Vue', 'Angular', 'React']
    };
  }
})
<script src="https://vuejs.org/js/vue.min.js"></script>
<div id="demo">
  <span v-for="(list, index) in lists">
    <span>{{list}}</span><span v-if="index+1 < lists.length">, </span>
  </span>
</div>

2
  • 3
    You can avoid usage of .length by comparing to 0, and inverting positons of text and command. See stackoverflow.com/a/42129590/6320039
    – Ulysse BN
    Mar 15, 2019 at 14:58
  • This is actually the best answer, works perfectly, thank you!
    – K. P.
    Mar 5, 2020 at 10:06
32

You could do it using a v-if attribute with a condition over the first argument, avoiding the usage of .length:

var app = new Vue({
  el: '#app',
  data: {
    list: ['john', 'fred', 'harry']
  }
})
<script src="https://vuejs.org/js/vue.min.js"></script><div id="app">
  <span v-for="(element, index) in list">
    <span v-if="index != 0">, </span><span>{{ element }}</span>
  </span>
</div>

3
  • I'd love to know why the downvoter downvoted. Hence I could improve this answer. And know how to do better next time.
    – Ulysse BN
    Aug 19, 2019 at 8:01
  • What is the problem with using .length? Nov 4, 2019 at 18:42
  • 1
    Performances, they might be affected since .length might be o(n) complexity. See this related question
    – Ulysse BN
    Nov 4, 2019 at 18:47
20

What I ended up doing instead was:

<span v-for="element in list" class="item">
  <span>{{ element }}</span>
</span>

And in CSS:

.item + .item:before {
  content: ", ";
}
4
  • 4
    This solution is very elegant, BUT the break line behavior is bad. When you resize the browser, the comma can go to the next line of the paragraph isolated of the last word. Jul 6, 2017 at 18:22
  • I did very similar .comma-list > li:not(:last-child)::after { content: ", " }
    – nclu
    Jun 1, 2018 at 20:10
  • Not a good solution, tends to mess with screen readers too, prevents correct browser handling of text (advanced font features, line breaks, etc). Don't abuse CSS for these tasks.
    – René Roth
    Sep 28, 2018 at 20:52
  • @PauloCheque, I wonder why you call it "elegant". To me, because it separates the comma from the element it's simply wrong. I do believe the elegant solution here is .join(', '). Because it makes commas stick with the last letter of each item and because it does not add an extra comma. That's "elegance" right there.
    – tao
    Apr 13, 2020 at 19:56
14

Better to use builtin JS Array.join method like this

<span>{{ list.join(', ') }}</span>
3
  • 3
    I believe this answer is a duplicate of stackoverflow.com/a/50910693/6320039.
    – Ulysse BN
    Aug 19, 2019 at 8:03
  • doesn't work if you need to do other stuff during the iteration, just for plain strings.
    – Karl Adler
    Feb 28, 2020 at 11:17
  • @Karl Adler in that case I'd use a computed variable or a method and do list.map.join
    – René Roth
    Jul 31, 2021 at 16:54
8

Solution using "template"

 <template v-for="(element, index) in list">
   <span>{{element}}</span><template v-if="index + 1 < list.length">, </template>
 </template>
0
3

If you wanted to do it the JS way, you can just do a computed property; you could even continue the span method.

computed {
  listCommaSeparated () { return this.list.join(', '); },
  listCommaSpans () { return '<span>' + this.list.join('</span><span>') + '</span>'; },
},

This would definitely be the preferred way from a rendering performance standpoint.

3

Just adding another alternative which I prefer to use:

<span v-for="(item, index) in list">
    {{ item }}{{ (index+1 < list.length) ? ', ' : '' }}
</span>
1

My component:

<template>
<ul v-if="model.length">
    <li v-for="item in model">{{item}}</li>
</ul>
</template>
<style scoped>
ul {
    list-style: none;
}
li {
    display: inline-block;
}
li:not(:last-child)::after {
    content: ", ";
}
</style>
<script>
export default {
    props: ['model']
};
</script>
1

Its possible sample
<span v-for="(item,i) in items"> {{(item !='' && i !=0) ? ',' : ''}} {{item.title}} </span>

1

If you do want control over how the dom looks (e.g. actually want to achieve the dom structure that you asked about), you can create a functional component like so:

<script>
// RenderList.vue
export default {
  functional: true,
  render(createElement, context) {
    // Read the list of entries by accessing the prop "list"
    const listEntries = context.props.list;

    // Return a custom list of elements for each list entry.
    // Only return a `,` if it's not the last entry.
    return listEntries.map((listElement, idx) => {
      return [
        createElement("span", listElement),
        idx < listEntries.length - 1 ? ", " : "",
      ];
    });
  },
};
</script>

You would use this component like so:

<template>
  <RenderList :list="['alice', 'bob', 'chuck']" />
</template>
0

May I suggest using i > 0 as check?

I've wrapped the separator so that {{ ' ' }} can be used for just having a space and avoiding span treated as being empty.

<span
    v-for="(item, i) in list"
    :key="i">
   <span v-if="i>0">{{ ', ' }}</span>
   <span class="text-nowrap">{{ item }}</span>
</span>

or

<span
    v-for="(item, i) in list"
    :key="i">
   <!-- if not wrapped in a span will leave a space before the comma -->
   <span>{{ (i > 0 ? ', ' : '') }}</span>
   <span class="text-nowrap">{{ item }}</span>
</span>
0

There are different views where using :after or :before to have a comma is not a good idea with respect to browser not handling it as a string when the window is resized.

If we try to use conditional operator in each iteration to check whether it is the first or the last element, it would be an overhead if we have large number of items. Also the conditions will be re-evaluated whenever we have change detection.

To overcome these 2 things, we can enclose the comma in a separate element and hide it using CSS :last-child selector as

<template v-for="item in list">
    <span class="item">
        {{item}}
        <span class="comma">
            ,
        </span>
    </span>
</template>

and in CSS

.item:last-child .comma {
    display: none;
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.