275

I'm trying to understand how to properly watch for some prop variation. I have a parent component (.vue files) that receive data from an ajax call, put the data inside an object and use it to render some child component through a v-for directive, below a simplification of my implementation:

<template>
    <div>
        <player v-for="(item, key, index) in players"
            :item="item"
            :index="index"
            :key="key"">
        </player>
    </div>
</template>

... then inside <script> tag:

 data(){
     return {
         players: {}
 },
 created(){
        let self = this;
        this.$http.get('../serv/config/player.php').then((response) => {
            let pls = response.body;
            for (let p in pls) {
                self.$set(self.players, p, pls[p]);
            }
    });
}

item objects are like this:

item:{
   prop: value,
   someOtherProp: {
       nestedProp: nestedValue,
       myArray: [{type: "a", num: 1},{type: "b" num: 6} ...]
    },
}

Now, inside my child "player" component I'm trying to watch for any Item's property variation and I use:

...
watch:{
    'item.someOtherProp'(newVal){
        //to work with changes in "myArray"
    },
    'item.prop'(newVal){
        //to work with changes in prop
    }
}

It works but it seems a bit tricky to me and I was wondering if this is the right way to do it. My goal is to perform some action every time prop changes or myArray gets new elements or some variation inside existing ones. Any suggestion will be appreciated.

  • 2
    Just use "item.someOtherProp": function (newVal, oldVal){ as @Ron suggested. – Reiner Oct 13 '17 at 13:58
  • 1
    @Reiner this was exactly what he was trying to avoid in the question; it's just the same thing using ES5 syntax. There actually isn't any additional overhead in watching a computed and it's a useful technique in various situations. – craig_h Oct 19 '17 at 13:03
  • Is it possible to watch for a change in all keys inside of an object? Example: "item.*": function(val){...} – Charlie Apr 8 at 14:30
426

You can use a deep watcher for that:

watch: {
  item: {
     handler(val){
       // do stuff
     },
     deep: true
  }
}

This will now detect any changes to the objects in the item array and additions to the array itself (when used with Vue.set). Here's a JSFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/je2rw3rs/

EDIT

If you don't want to watch for every change on the top level object, and just want a less awkward syntax for watching nested objects directly, you can simply watch a computed instead:

var vm = new Vue({
  el: '#app',
  computed: {
    foo() {
      return this.item.foo;
    }
  },
  watch: {
    foo() {
      console.log('Foo Changed!');
    }
  },
  data: {
    item: {
      foo: 'foo'
    }
  }
})

Here's the JSFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/oa07r5fw/

  • 2
    in this way "handler" will be invoked whenever any prop has a variation, my purpose is to separate the handlers in order to observe whether changes happends to "prop" or within myArray in "someOtherProp" separately – Plastic Feb 9 '17 at 10:41
  • 7
    If you just want to watch for changes on specific nested objects then what you are doing is fine. If you want a less awkward syntax you could watch a computed instead: jsfiddle.net/c52nda7x – craig_h Feb 9 '17 at 10:49
  • Exactly what I was looking for, now it seems so logic to me: create a computed property that return the nested prop and watch for it. Tnx a lot. – Plastic Feb 9 '17 at 10:57
  • I just want to add - that the second option is really not much different from the original watcher. Internally a computed property is just a watcher on all referenced objects/values in the function which sets a data-value to the result of the function. - So you probably only make the code a little more convoluted with the same effect. – Falco Sep 20 '17 at 12:11
  • 8
    @Falco I just discovered the answer in a comment here. peerbolte indicated that it can be done by putting the watch name in single quotes. I have tested this and it works. So in this case it'd be watch: { 'item.foo' : function(newVal, oldVal) { // do work here }} Pretty slick. I love Vue! – Ron C Sep 20 '17 at 21:15
306

Another good approach and one that is a bit more elegant is as follows:

 watch:{
     'item.someOtherProp': function (newVal, oldVal){
         //to work with changes in someOtherProp
     },
     'item.prop': function(newVal, oldVal){
         //to work with changes in prop
     }
 }

(I learned this approach from @peerbolte in the comment here )

  • 29
    way more elegant (not just a bit) :P. This should be in Vue.js documentation as it is a common use case. I've been searching for hours for a solution, thanks for your answer. – Symba Dec 19 '17 at 16:00
  • 7
    @symba It's interesting that people haven't noticed that this is the same thing the OP asked to avoid, just in ES5 syntax. We could of course argue that the ES2015 method definition itself is not very elegant, but it kind of misses the point of the question, which is how to avoid wrapping the name is quotes. I'm guessing most people are glossing over the original question, which already contains the answer, and are actually looking for something that, as you say, isn't very well documented, – craig_h Dec 22 '17 at 18:36
  • 8
    @RonC This is a popular question and your answer is exactly what a lot of people are searching for, so I think it sits well here. All of us only have limited time, and most of us barely read the questions, so this certainly wasn't a criticism of the answer you provided, I'm just being a bit pedantic in pointing out that my original answer was specific to the question and wasn't intended to be opinionated. I actually like the "watching computed" approach, however, many prefer the less convoluted "quotes" approach, which you have succinctly summarised in your answer. – craig_h Dec 22 '17 at 19:38
  • 8
    The official documentation includes this approach now – feihcsim Feb 15 '18 at 16:05
  • 2
    this should be selected as answer. – kapil.dev Sep 3 '18 at 14:19
4

How if you want to watch a property for a while and then to un-watch it?

Or to watch a library child component property?

You can use the "dynamic watcher":

this.$watch(
 'object.property', //what you want to watch
 (newVal, oldVal) => {
    //execute your code here
 }
)

The $watch returns an unwatch function which will stop watching if it is called.

var unwatch = vm.$watch('a', cb)
// later, teardown the watcher
unwatch()

Also you can use the deep option:

this.$watch(
'someObject', () => {
    //execute your code here
},
{ deep: true }
)

Please make sure to take a look to docs

2

VueJs deep watch in child objects

new Vue({
    el: "#myElement",
    data: {
        entity: {
            properties: []
        }
    },
    watch: {
        'entity.properties': {
            handler: function (after, before) {
                // Changes detected. Do work...     
            },
            deep: true
        }
    }
});
2

Not seeing it mentioned here, but also possible to use the vue-property-decorator pattern if you are extending your Vue class.

import { Watch, Vue } from 'vue-property-decorator';

export default class SomeClass extends Vue {
   ...

   @Watch('item.someOtherProp')
   someOtherPropChange(newVal, oldVal) {
      // do something
   }

   ...
}
1

My problem with the accepted answer of using deep: true, is that when deep-watching an array, I can't easily identify which element of the array contains the change. The only clear solution I've found is this answer, which explains how to make a component so you can watch each array element individually.

  • 1
    Yes that is true, but that's not what a deep watcher is for (in fact you'll find oldVal and newVal both reference the same object, so are the same). The intention of a deep watcher is to do something when the values change, such as emit an event, make an ajax call etc. Otherwise, you probably want a component, as pointed out in Mani's answer. – craig_h Dec 8 '18 at 13:56
0

Another way to add that I used to 'hack' this solution was to do this: I set up a seperate computed value that would simply return the nested object value.

data : function(){
    return {
        my_object : {
            my_deep_object : {
                my_value : "hello world";
            }.
        },
    };
},
computed : {
    helper_name : function(){
        return this.my_object.my_deep_object.my_value;
    },
},
watch : {
    helper_name : function(newVal, oldVal){
        // do this...
    }
}

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