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I have a code block that gets some data from a stored procedure. After I receive the data, I want to assign the value to "isExisting" depending on conditions. I don't want to assign a value to "isExisting" at the time of declaration.

bool isExisting;
using (var conn = new SqlConnection(System.Configuration.ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["ConnectionString"].ToString()))
{
    conn.Open();
    using (SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("some_stored_procedure", conn))
    {
        cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
        cmd.Parameters.Add(new SqlParameter("input", value));
        using (var adapter = new SqlDataAdapter(cmd))
        {
            DataSet ds = new DataSet();
            adapter.Fill(ds);
            if (ds.Tables.Count > 0)
            {
                if (ds.Tables[0].Rows.Count == 0)
                    isExisting = false;
                else
                {
                    foreach (DataRow row in ds.Tables[0].Rows)
                    {
                        if (row["Key"].ToString() == ValueToCompareWith)
                        {
                            isExisting = true;
                            break;
                        }
                        else
                            isExisting = false;
                    }
                }

            }
            else
                isExisting = false;
        }
    }
}
if (!isExisting) //Step :getting error "use of unassigned local variable"
{
}

I think I have covered every condition and the variable "isExisting" will have a value when it reaches "Step", but still I get compiler error.

The Problem started becuase my code review tool is throwing a comment

"A dead store happens when a local variable is assigned a value that is not read by any subsequent instruction. Calculating or retrieving a value only to then overwrite it or throw it away, could indicate a serious error in the code. Even if it's not an error, it is at best a waste of resources. Therefore all calculated values should be used."
Noncompliant Code Example

void CalculateRate(int a, int b)
{
  int i;

  i = a + b; // Noncompliant; calculation result not used before value is overwritten
  i = DoSomething();  // Noncompliant; retrieved value not used
  for (i = 0; i < 10; i++)
  {
    //  ...
  }
  // ...
}
1

As others have pointed out, the compiler is not smart enough to know whether you're actually assigning a value to the variable.

You can resolve this ambiguity, and clean up your code a lot, by using some Linq:

bool isExisting;
using (var conn = new SqlConnection(System.Configuration.ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["ConnectionString"].ToString()))
{
    conn.Open();
    using (SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("some_stored_procedure", conn))
    {
        cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
        cmd.Parameters.Add(new SqlParameter("input", value));
        using (var adapter = new SqlDataAdapter(cmd))
        {
            DataSet ds = new DataSet();
            adapter.Fill(ds);

            isExisting = ds.Tables
                .OfType<DataTable>()
                .Take(1)
                .SelectMany(t => t.Rows.OfType<DataRow>())
                .Any(r => r["Key"].ToString() == ValueToCompareWith);
        }
    }
}
if (!isExisting)
{
}

Another approach would be to factor out the isExisting check to a separate method:

bool CheckIsExisting(object value, string valueToCompareWith) 
{
    using (var conn = new SqlConnection(System.Configuration.ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["ConnectionString"].ToString()))
    {
        conn.Open();
        using (SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("some_stored_procedure", conn))
       {
            cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
            cmd.Parameters.Add(new SqlParameter("input", value));
            using (var adapter = new SqlDataAdapter(cmd))
            {
                DataSet ds = new DataSet();
                adapter.Fill(ds);
                if (ds.Tables.Count != 0 && ds.Tables[0].Rows.Count != 0)
                {
                    foreach (DataRow row in ds.Tables[0].Rows)
                    {
                        if (row["Key"].ToString() == ValueToCompareWith)
                        {
                            return true;
                        }
                    }
               }
           }
       }
    }

    return false;
}

Then do:

if (!CheckIsExisting(value, ValueToCompareWith))
{
    // do something...
}         
1

The compiler is a simpleton. It doesn't check all the logic to make sure that the variable always gets a value. That isn't it's job. Just give isExisting a default value to keep the compiler happy and your real code will set the correct value anyway (as you have already stated).

  • My code review tool says that I should not declare and assign the value, and the compiler is not able to figure out that at runtime, the value will be there. So, I am left stranded. – Rajat Feb 10 '17 at 4:38
  • 1
    Are you sure that is what your code review tool says? It's pretty much the opposite of best practice... – John3136 Feb 10 '17 at 4:40
  • Agree with @John3136. best practice is to set default value for any variable you create in the program. – Dirty Developer Feb 10 '17 at 5:28
  • I have added the code review comments in the question section. Kindly have a look @John3136 – Rajat Feb 10 '17 at 6:07
  • @RajatMalik That is true if it is a calculation etc (which yours isn't). It could also be because your code is not finished. You do actually read isExisting later, but perhaps it is optimised out because in your snippet you have an empty block. In this case I suggest understand what the tool is telling you, check scope (is it all the same isExisting?) and then ignore the error. – John3136 Feb 10 '17 at 7:43
1

Compiler can't know for sure if every piece of code will get hit - for example, if there could be no rows in this loop:

foreach (DataRow row in ds.Tables[0].Rows)

so therefore that entire if block won't be hit.

Set a default.

  • I have done a count of rows, so I have covered by bases. The point is compiler is not able to understand that I have covered all possible cases. – Rajat Feb 10 '17 at 4:36
  • 1
    Why the fundamental problem with setting the default value? In memory, technically the default(bool) is false. So initializing it as as false is better. If you REALLY need a "neither true nor false", use a Nullable<bool> or shorthand "bool?" and default it to null. – Andrew Arace Feb 10 '17 at 4:37
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Default value of Bool is false .Provide it at your code .

bool isExisting=false;

Your entire Business logic written in the code should take care for

if (!isExisting) {
}

Main logic behind is Compiler hardly bother what you scripted .It Only want the assigned value before making it use in any condition.

Refer here to understand more .

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