55

Let say, I want to pass some extra data when assigning an event handler. Consider the following code:

private void setup(string someData)
{
     Object.assignHandler(evHandler);
}

public void evHandler(Object sender)
{
    // need someData here!!!
}

How would I go about getting someData into my evHandler method?

51
private void setup(string someData)
{
     Object.assignHandler((sender) => evHandler(sender,someData));
}
public void evHandler(Object sender, string someData)
{
    // need someData here!!!
}
  • 1
    This is a great solution, but what if the EventHandler has TArgs already. Such as += new EventHandler<AsyncCompletedEventArgs>(evHandler)? – Roast Dec 23 '11 at 13:58
  • Hi @Lily , it's not entirely clear what you are asking. It might be better to post a question (rather than a comment) with a bit more detail and some code to demonstrate what you're trying to do. – spender Dec 24 '11 at 2:34
  • 1
    Thanks, this solved a problem I was having, but I'm new to C# so would you mind explaining what this language construct is or giving me a keyword to google for an explanation? – Tom Smilack Apr 11 '12 at 16:44
  • @TomSmilack, take a look at lambda expressions and capturing variables with closures. Basically, lambda expressions are a shorthand way of declaring a method (...and so much more, but that's a different story) – spender Apr 11 '12 at 16:56
  • 1
    @MohamedSakherSawan: Actually, I think your method introduces one hell-of-a-lot of boilerplate for little gain. Given that we have no indication from the OP that they have any control over the dispatching of the event (and therefore the type of event, a critical part of your solution) and that the event registration mechanism that they are using is non-standard (I don't see a += above), how does your answer relate to this question? Is it normal to downvote a good answer because yours is "better"? Should I downvote you too? – spender Nov 26 '13 at 2:02
22

I had a hard time figuring out @spender's example above especially with: Object.assignHandler((sender) => evHandler(sender,someData)); because there's no such thing as Object.assignHandler in the literal sense. So I did a little more Googling and found this example. The answer by Peter Duniho was the one that clicked in my head (this is not my work):

snip

The usual approach is to use an anonymous method with an event handler that has your modified signature. For example:

void Onbutton_click(object sender, EventArgs e, int i) { ... }

button.Click += delegate(object sender, EventArgs e) 
{ Onbutton_click(sender, e, 172); };

Of course, you don't have to pass in 172, or even make the third parameter an int. :)

/snip

Using that example I was able to pass in two custom ComboBoxItem objects to a Timer.Elapsed event using lambda notation:

simulatorTimer.Elapsed +=
(sender, e) => onTimedEvent(sender, e,
(ComboBoxItem) cbPressureSetting.SelectedItem,
(ComboBoxItem) cbTemperatureSetting.SelectedItem);

and then into it's handler:

static void onTimedEvent(object sender, EventArgs e, ComboBoxItem pressure, ComboBoxItem temperature)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Requested pressure: {0} PSIA\nRequested temperature: {1}° C", pressure, temperature);
    }

This isn't any new code from the examples above, but it does demonstrate how to interpret them. Hopefully someone like me finds it instructive & useful so they don't spend hours trying to understand the concept like I did.

This code works in my project (except for a non-thread-safe exception with the ComboBoxItem objects that I don't believe changes how the example works). I'm figuring that out now.

  • 1
    The only problem with this is that if you want to unsubscribe the event (and most likely you should), you'd be unsubscribing via an anonymous delegate, which you should not be doing - see this answer to a related question. – jbyrd Mar 29 '18 at 20:43
18

Captured variables:

private void setup(string someData)
{
    Object.assignHandler((sender,args) => {
        evHandler(sender, someData);
    });
}

public void evHandler(Object sender, string someData)
{
    // use someData here
}

Or (C# 2.0 alternative):

    Object.assignHandler((EventHandler)delegate(object sender,EventArgs args) {
        evHandler(sender, someData);
    });
  • 2
    is captured variable === closure? – Matt Nov 18 '10 at 14:39
  • 2
    @Matt - yes, captured variables are lexical closures. – Marc Gravell Nov 18 '10 at 14:40
  • To clarify, is the first solution not valid for C# .NET 2.0? – Andy Hin Nov 18 '10 at 14:43
  • 1
    @whydna the first solution needs C# 3.0 or above; there is a subtle syntax addition – Marc Gravell Nov 18 '10 at 14:51
3

you can try doing this:

string yourObject;

theClassWithTheEvent.myEvent += (sender, model) =>
{
 yourObject = "somthing";
}
1

My question that was similar was marked a duplicate so thought I'd add an answer here since it won't let me on my question.

class Program
    {
        delegate void ComponentEventHandler(params dynamic[] args);

        event ComponentEventHandler onTest;

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {  
            Program prg = new Program();

            // can be bound to event and called that way
            prg.onTest += prg.Test;
            prg.onTest.Invoke("What", 5, 12.0);

            Console.ReadKey();
        }

        public void Test(params dynamic[] values)
        {
            // assign our params to variables
            string name = values[0];
            int age = values[1];
            double value = values[2];

            Console.WriteLine(name);
            Console.WriteLine(age);
            Console.WriteLine(value);
        }
    }
0

Well, the simplest method id to make someData a member variable like so:

public class MyClass
{
    private string _eventData;

    private void setup(string someData) 
    {
       _eventData = someData;
       Object.assignHandler(evHandler);
    }

    public void evHandler()
    {
        // do something with _eventData here
    }
}

I'm not sure that's the best way to do it, but it really depends on the event type, the object, etc.

  • 1
    Was thinking about this method, however setup may be called several times with different someData. That data should be unique for each handler. – Andy Hin Nov 18 '10 at 14:39
  • In that case, spender or Marc's solution is much better – CodingGorilla Nov 18 '10 at 14:42
0

You could create a custom object having additional properties based on Object:

class CustomObject : Object
{
    public string SomeData;
}

private void setup(string someData)
{
    CustomObject customObject = new CustomObject { SomeData = someData };
    CustomObject.assignHandler(evHandler);
}

public void evHandler(Object sender)
{
    string someData = ((CustomObject)sender).SomeData;
}

If the data should not be changed anymore after initialization, you could also add a custom constructor, for example.

0

Here is my one-line solution that pass extra parameters to a timer handler.

private void OnFailed(uint errorCode, string message)
{
    ThreadPoolTimer.CreateTimer((timer) => {
    UI.ErrorMessage = string.Format("Error: 0x{0:X} {1}", errorCode, message);
    }, System.TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(100));
}

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