32

I have a dotnet console application that requires administrator privileges to run. I can't find how to do this. In a regular project I would add a app.manifest and set

<requestedExecutionLevel level="requireAdministrator" uiAccess="false" />

but I can't figure how to embed this in the build.

How do I do this?

2
  • You might be out of luck. This is a feature that is not available cross-platform in a consistent manner. .NET Core tries to only implement features that are available everywhere.
    – omajid
    Sep 7, 2017 at 13:17
  • Added an answer that shows how to do this in .NET core, it's not perfect and doesn't pop up the elevation box, but at least the user gets an error message.
    – jjxtra
    Oct 10, 2018 at 16:40

6 Answers 6

24

I found the simplest workaround would be to add the app.manifest file with the setting like what in net framework app

<requestedExecutionLevel level="requireAdministrator" uiAccess="false" />

then on your net core project file (.csproj in C# project) add the following:

<PropertyGroup>
  <ApplicationManifest>app.manifest</ApplicationManifest>
</PropertyGroup>

*Worked in Console and WPF netcore 3.0

5
  • So you can confirm that app.manifest is being honored in net core 3?
    – jjxtra
    Dec 27, 2019 at 21:19
  • @jjxtra yes as far as you add manually and modify the csproj; as mentioned above
    – tsuryadi
    Dec 29, 2019 at 3:45
  • So the simple answer is: As long as you are running your app on windows only this is exactly the same approach as in .net-framework-applications. (I can confirm this works with .net core 3.1 apps on wndows.)
    – anion
    Mar 26, 2020 at 19:44
  • Just a notice: it does work when you build application in windows. As soon as you build it in linux for windows target, it will not be included Dec 15, 2021 at 15:43
  • @SimonAchmüller I haven't tried in linux, but I believe you can use the magic keyword 'sudo' instead.
    – tsuryadi
    Dec 22, 2021 at 8:01
21

Add <ApplicationManifest>app.manifest</ApplicationManifest> to your csproj file.

MyProject.csproj

<Project Sdk="Microsoft.NET.Sdk">    
  <PropertyGroup>
    <OutputType>Exe</OutputType>
    <TargetFramework>netcoreapp3.1</TargetFramework>
    <ApplicationManifest>app.manifest</ApplicationManifest>
  </PropertyGroup>    
</Project>

Add the below app.manifest file to your project.

app.manifest

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<assembly manifestVersion="1.0" xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v1">
  <assemblyIdentity version="1.0.0.0" name="MyApplication.app"/>
  <trustInfo xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v2">
    <security>
      <requestedPrivileges xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v3">
        <requestedExecutionLevel level="requireAdministrator" uiAccess="false" />
      </requestedPrivileges>
    </security>
  </trustInfo>
</assembly>
3
  • where do I add this app.manifest file in the project folder?
    – Mimina
    Nov 2, 2021 at 9:14
  • 1
    @Mimina Always in the root of the project. Feb 5 at 8:16
  • @Alper's response is very helpful in many ways. I'm migrating my WPF application from the .net framework to .net 5.0 core. I had to implement Alper's suggestion to have my application run with administrative access.
    – A. Lartey
    Feb 25 at 20:30
9

In .NET core 2.X and earlier, the app.manifest appears to be ignored. However you can detect whether you are running as administrator and provide an error message to the user.

Simply call MainClass.RequireAdministrator() as the first thing in your Main method. This will work to give an error message on Windows and Linux if the process was not started as administrator/root. You may need to add the Windows compatibility NuGet package for it to work on Windows.

This does not force elevation, but at least the user gets a helpful error telling them how to resolve the problem.

using System.Runtime.InteropServices;
using System.Security.Principal;

namespace MyNamespace
{
    public static class MainClass
    {
        public static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            RequireAdministrator();
        }

        [DllImport("libc")]
        public static extern uint getuid();

        /// <summary>
        /// Asks for administrator privileges upgrade if the platform supports it, otherwise does nothing
        /// </summary>
        public static void RequireAdministrator()
        {
            string name = System.AppDomain.CurrentDomain.FriendlyName;
            try
            {
                if (RuntimeInformation.IsOSPlatform(OSPlatform.Windows))
                {
                    using (WindowsIdentity identity = WindowsIdentity.GetCurrent())
                    {
                        WindowsPrincipal principal = new WindowsPrincipal(identity);
                        if (!principal.IsInRole(WindowsBuiltInRole.Administrator))
                        {
                            throw new InvalidOperationException($"Application must be run as administrator. Right click the {name} file and select 'run as administrator'.");
                        }
                    }
                }
                else if (getuid() != 0)
                {
                    throw new InvalidOperationException($"Application must be run as root/sudo. From terminal, run the executable as 'sudo {name}'");
                }
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                throw new ApplicationException("Unable to determine administrator or root status", ex);
            }
        }
    }
}
1
  • This is a good answer too for those who want to support multiple OS's. Feb 5 at 8:17
3

This is not supported on .NET Core.

.NET Core implements that (extended) subset of .NET Framework features which are known to be cross-platform.

An application requesting and receiving elevate privileges is not supported on many non-Windows platforms. Hence it is not supported by .NET Core.

(Dropping privileges, on the other hand, might be supported by more platforms)

6
  • Added an answer that shows how to do this in .NET core, it's not perfect and doesn't pop up the elevation box, but at least the user gets an error message.
    – jjxtra
    Oct 10, 2018 at 16:40
  • I guess when I wrote this answer the windows compat pack did not exist. Please do keep in mind that it still only works on Windows. That nullifies one of the benefits of .NET Core which is cross platform compatibility.
    – omajid
    Oct 10, 2018 at 16:41
  • 5
    .NET Core 3.0 starts to support this (for WinForms and WPF) (eg. github.com/dotnet/winforms/issues/192)
    – Lex Li
    Feb 23, 2019 at 5:43
  • @LexLi, is there any other documentation stating that .NET Core 3.0 will support this? I've been unable to find anything official from Microsoft, and I have a WPF .NET Core 3.1 project and it fails with a compilation error when I follow the same instructions from your link: 'Values of attribute "level" not equal in different manifest snippets"
    – Tam Bui
    May 19, 2021 at 23:57
  • @TamBui Tiny little things like that won't end up in documentation, but the GitHub issue was fired under a Microsoft official repo and responded by Microsoft engineers, so it is usually considered official. What exactly is the error you hit? You probably ask a new question instead.
    – Lex Li
    May 20, 2021 at 1:27
3

To extend jjxtra's answer, if you are running cross-platform, obviously his answer won't work in non-Windows instances. I know... "pinvoke baaaaad", but in this case i think it's OK since there is no alternative that i know of.

So, for linux/mac, you could add this code in:

private static class LinuxNative
{
    [DllImport("libc")]
    public static extern uint getuid();
}

var isRoot = LinuxNative.getuid() == 0;
1

As omajid already pointed out in a comment, there is currently no way to force the elevation. You may however still be able to run the Terminal (Powershell, CMD etc.) with Administrator Privileges. That will also run your App with the same privileges - aka - Admin privileges. I needed that for the HttpListener to add prefixes to it.

0

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.