36

I have a python script in the same folder as a video I want to convert to a numpy array. My video is called 'test.mp4'.

Within my script, I want to call someFunction('test.mp4') and get back a numpy array. The resulting numpy array should be a numpy array of images, where each image is a 3-d numpy array.

Does that make sense?

Thanks!

1

4 Answers 4

36

skvideo is a python package can be used to read video and stores into the multi-dimensional array.

import skvideo.io  
videodata = skvideo.io.vread("video_file_name")  
print(videodata.shape)

For more details: http://www.scikit-video.org/stable/index.html and http://mllearners.blogspot.in/2018/01/scikit-video-skvideo-tutorial-for.html

4
  • 1
    How to turn it to numpy array? Commented Jan 19, 2018 at 11:08
  • videodata is in numpy format only. otherwise, import numpy as np --> temp = np.array(videodata) Commented Jan 19, 2018 at 11:17
  • 2
    This is cleaner and simpler than using cv2 Commented May 28, 2019 at 13:25
  • 2
    pip install scikit-video
    – Lenar Hoyt
    Commented Apr 24, 2022 at 19:52
35

The script below does what you want. You may separate part of it into the function.

Code below doesn't check for errors, in particular, production code will check that every frame* variable is greater than zero.

import cv2
import numpy as np

cap = cv2.VideoCapture('test.mp4')
frameCount = int(cap.get(cv2.CAP_PROP_FRAME_COUNT))
frameWidth = int(cap.get(cv2.CAP_PROP_FRAME_WIDTH))
frameHeight = int(cap.get(cv2.CAP_PROP_FRAME_HEIGHT))

buf = np.empty((frameCount, frameHeight, frameWidth, 3), np.dtype('uint8'))

fc = 0
ret = True

while (fc < frameCount  and ret):
    ret, buf[fc] = cap.read()
    fc += 1

cap.release()

cv2.namedWindow('frame 10')
cv2.imshow('frame 10', buf[9])

cv2.waitKey(0)
4
  • 1
    Note you might also consider processing a stream as holding an entire uncompressed video in memory can run you out of physical memory very quickly.
    – awiebe
    Commented Dec 22, 2018 at 23:04
  • what does converting a video to a numpy array get you? Commented Jun 28, 2019 at 14:54
  • How long will this code need to execute? Will it take as long as the video is?
    – Hacker
    Commented Feb 13, 2022 at 18:42
  • @Hacker The time is determined by decoding speed and is usually much shorter than video duration.
    – ivan_onys
    Commented Oct 16, 2022 at 16:27
2

Some of the comments here are interested in a speed comparision. OpenCV and skvideo are mentioned by others before me here, so will compare them here.

We will read 1000 frames and compare the speeds.

OpenCV Code

def read_video_cv2(n_frames=1000):
    cap = cv2.VideoCapture("rec_q26b_10min.mp4")
    all = []
    i = 0
    while cap.isOpened() and i < n_frames:
        ret, frame = cap.read()
        arr = np.array(frame)
        all.append(arr)
        i += 1
    return np.array(all)

scikit-video code

def read_video_sk(n_frames=1000):
    videodata = skvideo.io.vread("rec_q26b_10min.mp4", num_frames=n_frames)  
    return videodata

main function

if __name__ == "__main__":
    print(read_video_cv2().shape)
    print(read_video_sk().shape)

execution

❯ kernprof -l -v test.py
(1000, 480, 1280)
(1000, 480, 1280, 3)
rote profile results to test.py.lprof
Timer unit: 1e-06 s

Total time: 3.72707 s
File: test.py
Function: read_video_cv2 at line 24

Line #      Hits         Time  Per Hit   % Time  Line Contents
==============================================================
    24                                           @profile
    25                                           def read_video_cv2(n_frames=100):
    26         1      23785.0  23785.0      0.6      cap = cv2.VideoCapture("rec_q26b_10min.mp4")
    27         1          5.0      5.0      0.0      all = []
    28         1          1.0      1.0      0.0      i = 0
    29      1001       5261.0      5.3      0.1      while cap.isOpened() and i < n_frames:
    30      1000    2366040.0   2366.0     63.5          ret, frame = cap.read()
    31      1000     279732.0    279.7      7.5          arr = np.array(frame)
    32      1000       4769.0      4.8      0.1          all.append(arr)
    33      1000       1984.0      2.0      0.1          i += 1
    34         1    1045494.0 1045494.0     28.1      return np.array(all)

Total time: 3.32195 s
File: test.py
Function: read_video_sk at line 36

Line #      Hits         Time  Per Hit   % Time  Line Contents
==============================================================
    36                                           @profile
    37                                           def read_video_sk(n_frames=100):
    38         1    3321951.0 3321951.0    100.0      videodata = skvideo.io.vread("rec_q26b_10min.mp4", num_frames=n_frames)  
    39         1          2.0      2.0      0.0      return videodata

We can see that both methods will return numpy arrays of shape (1000, 480, 1280) and (1000, 480, 1280, 3) respectively (our video dimensions are 1280x480).

OpenCV with a simple while loop took a total execution time of 3.72s whereas skvideo took 3.32s.

So we can see times are very similar and my code is very unefficiently putting a list of arrays into a numpy array. I might suspect we could save some more time here if we pre-allocate the memory for the whole array and write to it efficiently and shave of half sec.

0

When we look to the video from image processing perspective, we can assume that it is a sequence of images. From this point, you can loop over the frames of your video and convert them into a numpy array.

Here is an example with Pillow and OpenCV libraries, where I'm converting the screenshots from my webcam into numpy arrays:

import cv2
import numpy as np
from PIL import Image, ImageOps    


def screenshot():
    global cam
    cv2.imwrite('screenshot.png', cam.read()[1])


if __name__ == '__main__':
    np.set_printoptions(suppress=True)

    cam = cv2.VideoCapture(0) # You can replace it with your video path
    
    while True:
        ret, img = cam.read()

        cv2.imshow('My Camera', img)

        ch = cv2.waitKey(5)
        if ch == 27:
            break

        screenshot()

        data = np.ndarray(shape=(1, 224, 224, 3), dtype=np.float32)

        image = Image.open('screenshot.png')

        size = (224, 224) # Put your suitable size
        image = ImageOps.fit(image, size, Image.ANTIALIAS)

        image_array = np.asarray(image) # Here, an image -> numpy array
        print(image_array)

    cv2.destroyAllWindows()

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