7

I'm trying to log into a website simultaneously using multiple credentials with aiohttp and asyncio. In the create_tasks function, I generate a list of sessions to be used for each. The reason I cannot just create a sesssion within the login function is because the same session object will be used throughout the code. What I'm trying to do is devise a way that I can use a context manager to handle the closing of the session (to avoid the runtime errors of leaving it open).

The following code works as intended (concurrent gathering of the login page and parsing of the token in a process pool), but it generates sessions separately from the tasks and requires me to close them at the end.

from bs4 import BeautifulSoup
from concurrent.futures import ProcessPoolExecutor
import aiohttp
import asyncio

#TODO: make this safe, handle exceptions

LOGIN_URL = "http://example.com/login"
CLIENT_CNT = 10
proc_pool = ProcessPoolExecutor(CLIENT_CNT)

def get_key(text):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    form = soup.find("form")
    key = form.find("input", attrs={"type": "hidden", "name": "authenticityToken"})
    return key.get("value", None)

async def login(username:str, password:str, session:aiohttp.ClientSession, sem:asyncio.BoundedSemaphore, loop:asyncio.AbstractEventLoop=None):
    loop = loop or asyncio.get_event_loop()
    async with sem:
        async with session.get(LOGIN_URL) as resp:
            x = await asyncio.ensure_future(loop.run_in_executor(proc_pool, get_key, await resp.text()))
            print(x)

def create_tasks(usernames, passwords, sem:asyncio.BoundedSemaphore, loop:asyncio.AbstractEventLoop=None):
    loop = loop or asyncio.get_event_loop()
    tasks = []
    sessions = []
    for u, p in zip(usernames, passwords):
        session = aiohttp.ClientSession(loop=loop)
        sessions.append(session)
        tasks.append(login(u, p, session, sem, loop))
    return tasks, sessions

if __name__ == "__main__":
    loop = asyncio.get_event_loop()
    sem = asyncio.BoundedSemaphore(CLIENT_CNT)
    usernames = ("a", "b", "c", "d", "e", "f", "g")
    passwords = ("a", "b", "c", "d", "e", "f", "g")
    tasks, sessions = create_tasks(usernames, passwords, sem, loop)
    loop.run_until_complete(asyncio.gather(*tasks, loop=loop))
    for session in sessions:
        session.close()

I previously made create_tasks a coroutine, wrote a wrapper class to make async iterables, and trying using

async with aiohttp.ClientSession() as session:
    tasks.append(login(u, p, session, sem, loop)

But as I feared, it said that the session was already closed by the time it was run.

  • 1
    shouldn't def create_tasks() be async def create_tasks()? – Juggernaut Feb 10 '17 at 19:28
  • It was when I used the async context manager for each session, but I changed it because that method didn't work and the async def was unnecessary. – Goodies Feb 10 '17 at 19:30
  • Why can't a task create a session, do the login process (obtaining a cookie, a token, etc), and close the session, all by itself? I don't see why a session, and not a session factory such as aiohttp.ClientSession, should be given to a task. – 9000 Feb 10 '17 at 19:36
  • Right. That would be the obvious thing to do, but as I mentioned, the same session (cookies and all) will need to be used in other parts of the code to access different pages under the same session. – Goodies Feb 10 '17 at 19:38
  • If you can restrict your runtime to Python 3.6 (you should), you don't have to pass loop around any more. It's much neater to rely on default event loop instead. – Dima Tisnek Feb 16 '17 at 14:13
4
+25

Here's a structure that makes reasoning easier:

async def user(u, p, ...):
    """Everything a single user does"""
    auth = await login(u, p)
    await download_something(auth, ...)
    await post_something(auth, ...)

async def login(u, p): ...
    async with aiohttp.ClientSession() as session:
        async with session.get("http://xxx/login", ...) as r:
            data = await r.json()
            return data["something"]

async def download_xxx(...): ...
async def post_xxx(...): ...

async def everything():
    creds = [("u1", "p1"), ...] 
    flows = [asyncio.ensure_future(user(cred)) for cred in creds]
    for flow in flows:
        await flow

Caveat programmator: aiohttp by default appears to store cookies, make sure it doesn't cross-pollinate your user flows.

Bonus points for: correct use of asyncio.gather() in the last async function.

  • If you want to store auth data in aiohttp.ClientSession (explicit or cookies), it may be most elegant to subclass it (but that's tight coupling). Another option is to rip out auth data (token as above or cookie) and pass that explicitly. – Dima Tisnek Feb 21 '17 at 8:17
1

Use ExitStack.

from contextlib import ExitStack

def create_tasks(..., context):
    tasks = []
    for username in usernames:
        session = aiohttp.ClientSession()
        tasks.append(...)
        context.enter_context(session)
    return tasks

if __name__ == "__main__":
    context = ExitStack()
    tasks = create_tasks(..., context)
    with context:
        loop.run_until_complete(asyncio.gather(*tasks))
  • So far, this may be the best contender, although I will have to do some testing. – Goodies Feb 19 '17 at 22:34
  • Looks very elegant! Very... "functional". If this works for OP, it implies a bit more mess, like passing session around, but may still be worth it. – Dima Tisnek Feb 21 '17 at 8:10
  • Here, the alternative to passing the session around (as in the question), is passing the context around. You need to pass a reference in some form to the sessions if you want to close them later. – Alvra Feb 21 '17 at 9:55
0

You didn't really explain what kind of tasks do you need, a simple get?

Something more complicated?

Do you want it to be specific per username/password?

Do you need to save all responses in the end?

For this code, I assumed username/password doesn't matter, but it can change quickly.

Instead of how you initiated the sessions separately I used consumer/producer pattern.

Each consumer a session with context manager, also no need for Semaphore (because of the queue).

import asyncio
from concurrent.futures import ProcessPoolExecutor

from aiohttp import ClientSession
from bs4 import BeautifulSoup

LOGIN_URL = "http://example.com/login"
CLIENT_CNT = 10
proc_pool = ProcessPoolExecutor(CLIENT_CNT)


def get_key(text):
    soup = BeautifulSoup(text, "html.parser")
    form = soup.find("form")
    key = form.find("input", attrs={"type": "hidden", "name": "authenticityToken"})
    return key.get("value", None)


async def init_consumer(username: str, password: str, loop, queue):
    loop = loop or asyncio.get_event_loop()
    async with ClientSession(loop=loop) as session:
        # init the session with creds? i you didn't use the username/password
        async with session.get(LOGIN_URL) as login_resp:
            x = await asyncio.ensure_future(loop.run_in_executor(proc_pool, get_key, await login_resp.text()))
            print(x)
        url = await queue.get()
        while url is not None:
            # Do things with session and queue
            async with session.get(url) as resp:
                rsp_as_txt = await resp.text()
            queue.task_done()
            url = await queue.get()


async def generate_tasks(queue):
    tasks = ["http://www.example.com" for i in range(20)]
    # putting all tasks in queue
    for task in tasks:
        await queue.put(task)
    # waiting for all tasks to finish
    queue.join()
    # Telling consumer to finish process
    for i in range(queue.maxsize):
        queue.put(None)


async def run(loop):
    queue = asyncio.Queue(CLIENT_CNT)
    usernames = ("a", "b", "c", "d", "e", "f", "g")
    passwords = ("a", "b", "c", "d", "e", "f", "g")
    consumers = [asyncio.ensure_future(init_consumer(u, p, loop, queue)) for u, p in zip(usernames, passwords)]
    return await generate_tasks(queue)


if __name__ == "__main__":
    loop = asyncio.get_event_loop()
    loop.run_until_complete(run(loop=loop))

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