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I am trying to return a C string from a function. The function is suppose to concatinate the 3 integers with commas and return the result as a char array however I'm getting garbage values. I'm assuming I'm not calling malloc correctly. Can someone advise on what's the problem?

using namespace std;

const char * createCommand(int p1, int p2, int p3){
    stringstream sstm;
    std::string comma = ",";
    sstm << p1 << comma << p2 << comma << p3;
    std::string str = sstm.str();
    const char *cstr = (const char *)malloc( (str.length()+1) * sizeof (char));

    cstr = str.c_str();
    return cstr;    
}

int main() {
    const char *cstr2 = createCommand(1,0,250); //I want to return "1,0,250"
    printf("char = %s\n",cstr2);
}
  • you are leaking quite a bit here. – Daniel A. White Feb 10 '17 at 21:12
  • Is there a specific reason you have to return a c-string? You should definitely not be writing code like this in C++ unless you have a very good reason. – Xirema Feb 10 '17 at 21:14
  • In C++ you should use new rather than malloc to allocate memory dynamically. – Barmar Feb 10 '17 at 21:15
  • 3
    Why not just return the std::string? – NathanOliver Feb 10 '17 at 21:18
  • @NathanOliver You mean return std::string and convert it into c string in main? – bakalolo Feb 10 '17 at 21:22
2

Since the other two answers already gave responses to the tune of dealing with the literal problem, I'm going to instead advise on what I consider a pretty significant design flaw causing your problem: returning c-strings.

In the example code you're providing, the use of c-strings at all makes no sense. The following code will achieve what you intend to do with no difficulty or problematic code:

std::string createCommand(int p1, int p2, int p3){
    std::stringstream sstm;
    std::string comma = ",";
    sstm << p1 << comma << p2 << comma << p3;
    return sstm.str();
}

int main() {
    std::string command = createCommand(1,0,250); //I want to return "1,0,250"
    std::cout << "char = " << command << "\n";
}

Even if you're confined to using printf instead of the C++ iostreams library, this design is still better:

std::string createCommand(int p1, int p2, int p3){
    std::stringstream sstm;
    std::string comma = ",";
    sstm << p1 << comma << p2 << comma << p3;
    return sstm.str();
}

int main() {
    std::string command = createCommand(1,0,250); //I want to return "1,0,250"
    printf("char = %s\n", command.c_str());
}

And if you need the c-string passed to some older, C-based library, this design will still suffice. The point being, there's no reason to use malloc or interface with the underlying c-string representation except through the string itself.

  • So the reason you don't have to deal with malloc for 'command.c_str()' is because it's in the main method? – bakalolo Feb 10 '17 at 21:33
  • No, it is because c_str() simply returns a pointer to memory that std::string owns. std::string will take care of freeing that memory for you. – Remy Lebeau Feb 10 '17 at 21:34
  • 1
    @bakalolo The reason you don't need to deal with malloc is because the std::string object manages its own dynamic memory. There's no reason for you to do it yourself. – Xirema Feb 10 '17 at 21:34
1

Assignment operator, which works fine for std::string and other objects, cannot have an override for pointers. Therefore, the assignment

cstr = str.c_str();

leaks the memory that you have allocated, and replaces the pointer with the data from the string. Moreover, the pointer that your function returns now, points into memory that is invalidated upon exiting the function, creating an undefined behavior in addition to a leak.

To fix this problem, call std::strcpy(cstr, str.c_str()); Don't forget to call std::free on the result of the call. Edit: you should remove const from the return type of your createCommand function (WhozCraig, thank you for the comment).

Note: I assume that this is only an exercise in using malloc, that you know that using new[] is preferable, and that you wouldn't have to do any of the above if you could return std::string from the function.

  • I would make no assumptions. Too many "C++ Programmers" are C Programmers who think C++ is just "C with classes", or that the same design principles apply to both languages. – Xirema Feb 10 '17 at 21:23
  • @Xirema According to OP's profile, it does not look like he's got a lot of prior C experience, so my best guess is that this is a learning exercise. – dasblinkenlight Feb 10 '17 at 21:25
  • One additional note: the OP's code shows createCommand as returning const char*, which makes no sense when returning a malloc result, since the caller, short of breaking const-ness, cannot subsequently free the resulting pointer. The changes in this answer are exactly what the OP needs, but in addition, the call should return char*, at which point the recommendation to remember free() by the caller becomes viable. – WhozCraig Feb 10 '17 at 21:26
  • 1
    @WhozCraig Oh, you know what? I mixed up the rules for free and delete. The behavior of free is only as I describe it in ANSI C, in C++, it behaves the way you described. delete behaves exactly the way I described, but free freaks out if you pass it a const pointer. – Xirema Feb 10 '17 at 21:41
  • 1
    @Xirema I'm amazed that even compiled. That's one lax C compiler. I always thought they were good enough to catch that these days. freeing const pointers has been asked on SO before. – WhozCraig Feb 10 '17 at 21:42
0

You'll need to copy the string with some form of strcpy, before returning the pointer.

const char * createCommand(int p1, int p2, int p3){
    stringstream sstm;
    std::string comma = ",";
    sstm << p1 << comma << p2 << comma << p3;
    std::string str = sstm.str();
    const char *cstr = (const char *)malloc( (str.length()+1) * sizeof (char));

    strcpy(cstr, str.c_str());
    return cstr;    
}

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