0

I am looking @Domenic's simple example of using requirejs, from this answer: simple example for using require.js which I am including here.

shirt.js:

define({
    color: "black",
    size : "large"
});

logger.js:

define(function (require) {
    var shirt = require("./shirt");

    return {
        logTheShirt: function () {
            console.log("color: " + shirt.color + ", size: " + shirt.size);
        }
    };
});

main.js:

define(function (require) {
    var shirt = require("./shirt");
    var logger = require("./logger");

    alert("Shirt color is: " + shirt.color);
    logger.logTheShirt();
});

main.html:

<script data-main="../js/main" src="../js/require.js"></script>

There's something very strange going on: at the point where shirt.color is used in main.js, shirt.js and logger.js have just been scheduled to be loaded, asynchonously (I presume), so shirt.js hasn't actually been read yet. The reason I presume the loading is asynchronous is that my impression is that synchronous loading has been pretty much outlawed in javascript in chrome (XMLHttpRequest still has an option to be synchronous, but if used, it warns on the chrome console Synchronous XMLHttpRequest on the main thread is deprecated because of its detrimental effects to the end user's experience.).

And yet, this little app seems to work, reliably. It even works reliably if I replace "./shirt.js" by a url referring to a resource on the other side of the world, and I clear my browser cache before loading the html page.

How can this be??

If I look at timings in chrome dev console, it appears that the time-consuming shirt.js load actually happened before the function that requested it even started. I.e. somehow it knew to load shirt.js before anything in the program referred to "./shirt" at all.

It seems there is some very sneaky magic going on here. So I'm interested to know:

  1. how did requirejs know to load shirt.js before anything asked for it?
  2. to what extent can this be relied on?
  3. how would one modify this example to avoid relying on the sneaky magic?
  4. for those of us who don't trust sneaky magic, is there a way to disable it when using requirejs?
1

how did requirejs know to load shirt.js before anything asked for it?

This is your module:

define(function (require) {
    var shirt = require("./shirt");
    var logger = require("./logger");

    alert("Shirt color is: " + shirt.color);
    logger.logTheShirt();
});

When define is called, RequireJS detects that it was called without a dependency list. So it scans the callback you pass for instances of the require call taking a single argument which is a string literal, and it grabs the single argument and makes a list of these arguments that it takes as the dependency list of the module. Your module becomes functionally equivalent to this:

define(["require", "./shirt", "./logger"], function (require) {
    var shirt = require("./shirt");
    var logger = require("./logger");

    alert("Shirt color is: " + shirt.color);
    logger.logTheShirt();
});

So ./shirt and ./logger are loaded before the callback is actually called. Then when require("./shirt") and require("./logger") are executed, they are just lookups in a map of already loaded modules. (And, because of this, calls to require with a single string argument can only work when called in a callback passed to define. Otherwise, you get the dreaded "Module has not been loaded yet for context" error.)

This capability is called the "CommonJS sugar" because a require call that uses a single parameter which is a string and returns a module is what CommonJS supports natively. The native AMD require call takes an array of dependencies as the first argument and an optional callback to which the resolved modules are passed.

to what extent can this be relied on?

I've relied on the CommonJS sugar for hundred of modules without problem.

The one limitation to this pattern is if you try to pass something else than a string literal to require. For instance if you do this:

define(function (require) {
    var shirtName = "./shirt";
    var shirt = require(shirtName);

This will throw off RequireJS. It won't detect that your module needs the ./shirt module and you'll get the error I mentioned above.

how would one modify this example to avoid relying on the sneaky magic?

define(["./shirt", "./logger"], function (shirt, logger) {
    alert("Shirt color is: " + shirt.color);
    logger.logTheShirt();
});

for those of us who don't trust sneaky magic, is there a way to disable it when using requirejs?

There's no flag you can use to prevent RequireJS from supporting the CommonJS sugar. If you want to avoid relying on it in your own code, you can code your modules like I've shown in the previous snippet: call define with a list of dependencies as the first argument, and get the modules as arguments of your callback.

This being said, I see no good reason to do that. I've used RequireJS for years and if anything I've been moving code that uses define with a list of dependencies to code that relies on the CommonJS sugar. I find that the latter works better with various development tools.

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.