3

I try to learn PDO and prepared statements. I have read all the documentation and I have some questions. If I understand, in a case like below, it is not possible and there is not need for prepared statements. Is that correct? is it secure enough?

try {
    $conn = new PDO("mysql:host=$servername; dbname=$dbname", $username, $password);
    $conn->setAttribute(PDO::ATTR_ERRMODE, PDO::ERRMODE_EXCEPTION);
    echo "Connected successfully <br>";

    $sql = "SELECT title_post, subtitle_post 
            FROM en";
    $statement = $conn->prepare($sql);
    $statement->execute();

    $rows = $statement->fetchAll();
    foreach($rows as $row){
        echo $row['title_post'] . '<br>';
        echo $row['subtitle_post'] . '<br>';
    }
}
catch(PDOException $e) {
    echo "Error: " . $e->getMessage();
}
$conn = null;
  • 1
    If you don't take user input, there is no need to use pdo, heck you could even use mysql instead of mysqli – 131 Feb 11 '17 at 11:04
1

execute() runs a prepared statement which allows you to bind parameters to avoid the need to escape or quote the parameters. execute will also perform better if you are repeating a query multiple times.

The query() runs a standard SQL statement and requires you to properly escape all data to avoid SQL Injections and other issues.

so in your case you have nothigs to escape .. because all the code for sql i based on literal and you don't need prepare()

  • Ok, I do not need prepared statements. My question now is: Is it ok if I use the code as it is? or it is better to delete the prepare and execute line of code and make a different foreach? – Nrc Feb 11 '17 at 11:20
  • The advantage for using query instead od prepare and execute a really really really minimun pratically 0 .. for me you can use the code you have also if you repaet the same code 10000 times . – scaisEdge Feb 11 '17 at 12:04
1

If the query string is constant, there's no place for malicious SQL to be injected. As you noted, using a prepared statement is indeed redundant.

  • Even when I do not need the prepared statements, can I use the code as it is now? – Nrc Feb 11 '17 at 11:50
  • It's a tad redundant, but I, personally, wouldn't bother rewriting it. – Mureinik Feb 11 '17 at 12:01

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