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We are currently having difficulties with a sql server procedure timing out on queries. 9 times out of 10 the query will run within 5 second max, however, on occasions, the proc can continue to run in excess of 2 mins and causing time outs on the front end (.net MVC application)..

They have been investigating this for over a week now, checking jobs, server performance and all seems to be ok..

The DBA's have narrowed it down to a particular table which is being bombarded from different application with inserts / updates. This in combination with the complex select query that is causing the time out that joins on that table (im being told) is causing the time outs..

Are there any suggestions at all to how to get around these time outs? ie.

  • replicate the table and query the new table?
  • Any additional debugging that can prove that this is actually the issue?
  • Perhaps cache the data on the front end, if a time out, call data from cache?
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A table being bombarded with updates is a table being bombarded with locks. And yes, this can affect performance.

First, copy the table and run the query multiple times. There are other possibilities for the performance issue.

One cause of unstable stored procedure performance in SQL Server is compilation. The code in the stored procedure is compiled the first time it is executed -- the resulting execution plan might work for some inputs and not others. This is readily fixed by using the option to recompile the queries each time (although this adds overhead).

Then, think about the query. Does it need the most up-to-date data? If not, perhaps you can just copy the table once per hour or once per day.

If the most recent data is needed, you might need to re-think the architecture. A table that does insert-only using a clustered identity column always inserts at the end of the table. This is less likely to interfere with queries on the table.

Replication may or may not help the problem. After all, full replication will be doing the updates on the replicated copy. You don't solve the "bombardment" problem by bombarding two tables.

If your queries involve a lot of historical data, then partitioning might help. Only the most recent partition would be "bombarded", leaving the others more responsive to queries.

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The DBA's have narrowed it down to a particular table which is being bombarded from different application with inserts / updates. This in combination with the complex select query that is causing the time out that joins on that table (im being told) is causing the time outs

We used to face many time outs and used to get a lot of escalations..This is the approach we followed for reducing time outs..

Some may be applicable in your case,some may not...but following will not cause any harm

Change below sql server settings:
1.Remote login timeout :60
2.Remote query timeout:0

Also if your windows server is set to use Dynamic ram,try changing it to static ram..

You may also have to tune,some of windows server settings

TCP Offloading/Chimney & RSS…What is it and should I disable it?

Following above steps,reduced our time outs by 99%..

For the rest 1%,we have dealt each case seperately

1.Update statistics for those tables involved in the query
2.Try fine tuning the query further

This helped us reduce time outs totally..

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