163

I am using a instance of UIWebView to process some text and color it correctly, it gives the result as HTML but rather than displaying it in the UIWebView I want to display it using Core Text with a NSAttributedString.

I am able to create and draw the NSAttributedString but I am unsure how I can convert and map the HTML into the attributed string.

I understand that under Mac OS X NSAttributedString has a initWithHTML: method but this was a Mac only addition and is not available for iOS.

I also know that there is a similar question to this but it had no answers, I though I would try again and see whether anyone has created a way to do this and if so, if they could share it.

1
  • 2
    The NSAttributedString-Additions-for-HTML library has been renamed and rolled into a framework by the same author. It's now called DTCoreText and includes a bunch of Core Text layout classes. You can find it over here Jan 4, 2012 at 14:49

17 Answers 17

308

In iOS 7, UIKit added an initWithData:options:documentAttributes:error: method which can initialize an NSAttributedString using HTML, eg:

[[NSAttributedString alloc] initWithData:[htmlString dataUsingEncoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding] 
                                 options:@{NSDocumentTypeDocumentAttribute: NSHTMLTextDocumentType,
                                           NSCharacterEncodingDocumentAttribute: @(NSUTF8StringEncoding)} 
                      documentAttributes:nil error:nil];

In Swift:

let htmlData = NSString(string: details).data(using: String.Encoding.unicode.rawValue)
let options = [NSAttributedString.DocumentReadingOptionKey.documentType:
        NSAttributedString.DocumentType.html]
let attributedString = try? NSMutableAttributedString(data: htmlData ?? Data(),
                                                          options: options,
                                                          documentAttributes: nil)
25
  • 31
    For some reason, the option NSDocumentTypeDocumentAttribute: NSHTMLTextDocumentType is causing the encoding to take a really, really long time :( Oct 4, 2013 at 19:06
  • 17
    Too bad NSHTMLTextDocumentType is (literally) ~1000x slower than setting attributes with NSRange. (Profiled a short label with one bold tag.) Oct 23, 2013 at 16:28
  • 6
    Be aware that if you can't NSHTMLTextDocumentType with this method if you want to use it from a background thread. Even with ios 7, it won't use TextKit for the HTML rendering. Take a look at the DTCoreText library recommended by Ingve.
    – TJez
    Nov 12, 2013 at 18:27
  • 2
    Awesome. Just a thought, you could probably do [NSNumber numberWithInt:NSUTF8StringEncoding] as @(NSUTF8StringEncoding), no?
    – Jarsen
    Dec 19, 2013 at 16:51
  • 17
    I was doing this, but be careful on iOS 8. It's painfully slow, close to a second for a few hundred characters. (In iOS 7 it was nearly instantaneous.)
    – Norman
    Sep 16, 2014 at 21:01
47

There is a work-in-progress open source addition to NSAttributedString by Oliver Drobnik at Github. It uses NSScanner for HTML parsing.

3
  • Requires min deployment of iOS 4.3 :( None-the-less, very impressive. Mar 20, 2012 at 17:37
  • 3
    @Lirik Overkill for you maybe but perfect for someone else i.e. your comment isn't in the least bit helpful.
    – wuf810
    Nov 4, 2014 at 9:41
  • 3
    Please note that this project requires is open source and covered by a standard 2-clause BSD license. That means you have to mention Cocoanetics as the original author of this code and reproduce the LICENSE text inside your app.
    – dulgan
    Jul 27, 2015 at 10:01
33

Creating an NSAttributedString from HTML must be done on the main thread!

Update: It turns out that NSAttributedString HTML rendering depends on WebKit under the hood, and must be run on the main thread or it will occasionally crash the app with a SIGTRAP.

New Relic crash log:

enter image description here

Below is an updated thread-safe Swift 2 String extension:

extension String {
    func attributedStringFromHTML(completionBlock:NSAttributedString? ->()) {
        guard let data = dataUsingEncoding(NSUTF8StringEncoding) else {
            print("Unable to decode data from html string: \(self)")
            return completionBlock(nil)
        }

        let options = [NSDocumentTypeDocumentAttribute : NSHTMLTextDocumentType,
                   NSCharacterEncodingDocumentAttribute: NSNumber(unsignedInteger:NSUTF8StringEncoding)]

        dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue()) {
            if let attributedString = try? NSAttributedString(data: data, options: options, documentAttributes: nil) {
                completionBlock(attributedString)
            } else {
                print("Unable to create attributed string from html string: \(self)")
                completionBlock(nil)
            }
        }
    }
}

Usage:

let html = "<center>Here is some <b>HTML</b></center>"
html.attributedStringFromHTML { attString in
    self.bodyLabel.attributedText = attString
}

Output:

enter image description here

4
  • Andrew. This is working fine. I wanted to know what all short of events that i have to handle in my UITextView if i will go with this approach. Can it handle Calendar event , Call, Email, Website link etc available in HTML? I hope UITextView is able to handle events compare to UILabel. Feb 11, 2016 at 12:23
  • The above approach is only good for formatting. I would recommend using TTTAttributedLabel if you need event handling. Feb 22, 2016 at 21:00
  • The default encoding that NSAttributedString uses is NSUTF16StringEncoding (not UTF8!). That's why this will not work. At least in my case!
    – Umit Kaya
    Jan 19, 2017 at 16:36
  • This should be the accepted solution. Doing an HTML string conversation on a background thread will eventually crash, and quite frequently while running tests.
    – ratsimihah
    Mar 20, 2018 at 18:04
22

Swift initializer extension on NSAttributedString

My inclination was to add this as an extension to NSAttributedString rather than String. I tried it as a static extension and an initializer. I prefer the initializer which is what I've included below.

Swift 4

internal convenience init?(html: String) {
    guard let data = html.data(using: String.Encoding.utf16, allowLossyConversion: false) else {
        return nil
    }

    guard let attributedString = try?  NSAttributedString(data: data, options: [.documentType: NSAttributedString.DocumentType.html, .characterEncoding: String.Encoding.utf8.rawValue], documentAttributes: nil) else {
        return nil
    }

    self.init(attributedString: attributedString)
}

Swift 3

extension NSAttributedString {

internal convenience init?(html: String) {
    guard let data = html.data(using: String.Encoding.utf16, allowLossyConversion: false) else {
        return nil
    }

    guard let attributedString = try? NSMutableAttributedString(data: data, options: [NSAttributedString.DocumentReadingOptionKey.documentType: NSAttributedString.DocumentType.html], documentAttributes: nil) else {
        return nil
    }

    self.init(attributedString: attributedString)
}
}

Example

let html = "<b>Hello World!</b>"
let attributedString = NSAttributedString(html: html)
4
  • i want hello world to be like this <p><b><i>hello</i></b> <i>world</i></p> Jun 6, 2017 at 10:52
  • Save some LOC and replace guard ... NSMutableAttributedString(data:... by try self.init(data:... (and add throws to the init)
    – nyg
    Sep 11, 2017 at 15:20
  • and finally it doesn't work - text gains random font size Apr 13, 2018 at 9:40
  • 2
    You are decoding the data with UTF-8 but you encoded it with UTF-16
    – Shyam Bhat
    Sep 20, 2018 at 13:29
12

This is a String extension written in Swift to return a HTML string as NSAttributedString.

extension String {
    func htmlAttributedString() -> NSAttributedString? {
        guard let data = self.dataUsingEncoding(NSUTF16StringEncoding, allowLossyConversion: false) else { return nil }
        guard let html = try? NSMutableAttributedString(data: data, options: [NSDocumentTypeDocumentAttribute: NSHTMLTextDocumentType], documentAttributes: nil) else { return nil }
        return html
    }
}

To use,

label.attributedText = "<b>Hello</b> \u{2022} babe".htmlAttributedString()

In the above, I have purposely added a unicode \u2022 to show that it renders unicode correctly.

A trivial: The default encoding that NSAttributedString uses is NSUTF16StringEncoding (not UTF8!).

2
  • UTF16 saved my day, Thanks samwize!
    – Yueyu
    Mar 26, 2019 at 12:36
  • UTF16 saved my day, Thanks samwize!
    – Yueyu
    Mar 26, 2019 at 12:37
6

Made some modification on Andrew's solution and update the code to Swift 3:

This code now use UITextView as self and able to inherit its original font, font size and text color

Note: toHexString() is extension from here

extension UITextView {
    func setAttributedStringFromHTML(_ htmlCode: String, completionBlock: @escaping (NSAttributedString?) ->()) {
        let inputText = "\(htmlCode)<style>body { font-family: '\((self.font?.fontName)!)'; font-size:\((self.font?.pointSize)!)px; color: \((self.textColor)!.toHexString()); }</style>"

        guard let data = inputText.data(using: String.Encoding.utf16) else {
            print("Unable to decode data from html string: \(self)")
            return completionBlock(nil)
        }

        DispatchQueue.main.async {
            if let attributedString = try? NSAttributedString(data: data, options: [NSDocumentTypeDocumentAttribute: NSHTMLTextDocumentType], documentAttributes: nil) {
                self.attributedText = attributedString
                completionBlock(attributedString)
            } else {
                print("Unable to create attributed string from html string: \(self)")
                completionBlock(nil)
            }
        }
    }
}

Example usage:

mainTextView.setAttributedStringFromHTML("<i>Hello world!</i>") { _ in }
5

Swift 3.0 Xcode 8 Version

func htmlAttributedString() -> NSAttributedString? {
    guard let data = self.data(using: String.Encoding.utf16, allowLossyConversion: false) else { return nil }
    guard let html = try? NSMutableAttributedString(data: data, options: [NSDocumentTypeDocumentAttribute: NSHTMLTextDocumentType], documentAttributes: nil) else { return nil }
    return html
}
5

Swift 4


  • NSAttributedString convenience initializer
  • Without extra guards
  • throws error

extension NSAttributedString {

    convenience init(htmlString html: String) throws {
        try self.init(data: Data(html.utf8), options: [
            .documentType: NSAttributedString.DocumentType.html,
            .characterEncoding: String.Encoding.utf8.rawValue
        ], documentAttributes: nil)
    }

}

Usage

UILabel.attributedText = try? NSAttributedString(htmlString: "<strong>Hello</strong> World!")
4
  • You save my day. Thank you.
    – pkc456
    May 9, 2019 at 17:22
  • @pkc456 meta.stackexchange.com/questions/5234/…, do upvote :) thanks!
    – AamirR
    May 9, 2019 at 17:23
  • How can I set font size and font family?
    – kirqe
    Oct 1, 2019 at 20:28
  • That's much better than suggested by Mobile Dan, since it doesn't involve a redundant copy with self.init(attributedString: attributedString)
    – cyanide
    Mar 7, 2020 at 0:15
3

The only solution you have right now is to parse the HTML, build up some nodes with given point/font/etc attributes, then combine them together into an NSAttributedString. It's a lot of work, but if done correctly, can be reusable in the future.

3
  • 1
    If the HTML is XHTML-Strict, you could use NSXMLDOcument and friends to help with the parsing. Nov 18, 2010 at 18:37
  • How would you suggest I go about building up the nodes with given attributes?
    – Joshua
    Nov 18, 2010 at 19:11
  • 2
    That's an implementation detail. However you parse the HTML, you have access to each attribute for each tag, which specifies things like a font name, size, etc. You can use this information to store the relevant details you'd need to add to the attributed text as attributes. Generally, you need to get yourself familiar with parsing first before tackling such a task.
    – jer
    Nov 18, 2010 at 21:27
3

Using of NSHTMLTextDocumentType is slow and it is hard to control styles. I suggest you to try my library which is called Atributika. It has its own very fast HTML parser. Also you can have any tag names and define any style for them.

Example:

let str = "<strong>Hello</strong> World!".style(tags:
    Style("strong").font(.boldSystemFont(ofSize: 15))).attributedString

label.attributedText = str

You can find it here https://github.com/psharanda/Atributika

0
2

The above solution is correct.

[[NSAttributedString alloc] initWithData:[htmlString dataUsingEncoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding] 
                                 options:@{NSDocumentTypeDocumentAttribute: NSHTMLTextDocumentType,
                                           NSCharacterEncodingDocumentAttribute: @(NSUTF8StringEncoding)} 
                      documentAttributes:nil error:nil];

But the app wioll crash if you are running it on ios 8.1,2 or 3.

To avoid the crash what you can do is : run this in a queue. So that it always be on main thread.

2
  • @alecex I did meet the same problem! app will crash on iOS 8.1, 2, 3. But will be fine on iOS 8.4 or later. Can you explain in detail how to avoid it? or is there any work around, or methods can be used instead?
    – Strong84
    Jan 1, 2016 at 9:06
  • I made a quick category to handle this, copying the methods from AppKit, which has a very easy and intuitive way to do this. Why Apple didn't add it is beyond me.: github.com/cguess/NSMutableAttributedString-HTML
    – CGuess
    Feb 2, 2016 at 20:31
2

Swift 3:
Try this:

extension String {
    func htmlAttributedString() -> NSAttributedString? {
        guard let data = self.data(using: String.Encoding.utf16, allowLossyConversion: false) else { return nil }
        guard let html = try? NSMutableAttributedString(
            data: data,
            options: [NSDocumentTypeDocumentAttribute: NSHTMLTextDocumentType],
            documentAttributes: nil) else { return nil }
        return html
    }
}  

And for using:

let str = "<h1>Hello bro</h1><h2>Come On</h2><h3>Go sis</h3><ul><li>ME 1</li><li>ME 2</li></ul> <p>It is me bro , remember please</p>"

self.contentLabel.attributedText = str.htmlAttributedString()
0
1

The built in conversion always sets the text color to UIColor.black, even if you pass an attributes dictionary with .forgroundColor set to something else. To support DARK mode on iOS 13, try this version of the extension on NSAttributedString.

extension NSAttributedString {
    internal convenience init?(html: String)                    {
        guard 
            let data = html.data(using: String.Encoding.utf16, allowLossyConversion: false) else { return nil }

        let options : [DocumentReadingOptionKey : Any] = [
            .documentType: NSAttributedString.DocumentType.html,
            .characterEncoding: String.Encoding.utf8.rawValue
        ]

        guard
            let string = try? NSMutableAttributedString(data: data, options: options,
                                                 documentAttributes: nil) else { return nil }

        if #available(iOS 13, *) {
            let colour = [NSAttributedString.Key.foregroundColor: UIColor.label]
            string.addAttributes(colour, range: NSRange(location: 0, length: string.length))
        }

        self.init(attributedString: string)
    }
}
1

Here is the Swift 5 version of Mobile Dan's answer:

public extension NSAttributedString {
    convenience init?(_ html: String) {
        guard let data = html.data(using: .unicode) else {
                return nil
        }

        try? self.init(data: data, options: [.documentType: NSAttributedString.DocumentType.html], documentAttributes: nil)
    }
}
1
  • How do you implement this in a SwiftUI view? Dec 21, 2021 at 21:01
0

Helpful Extensions

Inspired by this thread, a pod, and Erica Sadun's ObjC example in iOS Gourmet Cookbook p.80, I wrote an extension on String and on NSAttributedString to go back and forth between HTML plain-strings and NSAttributedStrings and vice versa -- on GitHub here, which I have found helpful.

The signatures are (again, full code in a Gist, link above):

extension NSAttributedString {
    func encodedString(ext: DocEXT) -> String?
    static func fromEncodedString(_ eString: String, ext: DocEXT) -> NSAttributedString? 
    static func fromHTML(_ html: String) -> NSAttributedString? // same as above, where ext = .html
}

extension String {
    func attributedString(ext: DocEXT) -> NSAttributedString?
}

enum DocEXT: String { case rtfd, rtf, htm, html, txt }
0

honoring font family, dynamic font I've concocted this abomination:

extension NSAttributedString
{
    convenience fileprivate init?(html: String, font: UIFont? = Font.dynamic(style: .subheadline))
    {
        guard let data = html.data(using: String.Encoding.utf8, allowLossyConversion: true) else {
        var totalString = html
        /*
         https://stackoverflow.com/questions/32660748/how-to-use-apples-new-san-francisco-font-on-a-webpage
            .AppleSystemUIFont I get in font.familyName does not work
         while -apple-system does:
         */
        var ffamily = "-apple-system"
        if let font = font {
            let lLDBsucks = font.familyName
            if !lLDBsucks.hasPrefix(".appleSystem") {
                ffamily = font.familyName
            }
            totalString = "<style>\nhtml * {font-family: \(ffamily) !important;}\n            </style>\n" + html
        }
        guard let data = totalString.data(using: String.Encoding.utf8, allowLossyConversion: true) else {
            return nil
        }
        assert(Thread.isMainThread)
        guard let attributedText = try?  NSAttributedString(data: data, options: [.documentType: NSAttributedString.DocumentType.html, .characterEncoding: String.Encoding.utf8.rawValue], documentAttributes: nil) else {
            return nil
        }
        let mutable = NSMutableAttributedString(attributedString: attributedText)
        if let font = font {
        do {
            var found = false
            mutable.beginEditing()
            mutable.enumerateAttribute(NSAttributedString.Key.font, in: NSMakeRange(0, attributedText.length), options: NSAttributedString.EnumerationOptions(rawValue: 0)) { (value, range, stop) in
                    if let oldFont = value as? UIFont {
                        let newsize = oldFont.pointSize * 15 * Font.scaleHeruistic / 12
                        let newFont = oldFont.withSize(newsize)
                        mutable.addAttribute(NSAttributedString.Key.font, value: newFont, range: range)
                        found = true
                    }
                }
                if !found {
                    // No font was found - do something else?
                }

            mutable.endEditing()
            
//            mutable.addAttribute(.font, value: font, range: NSRange(location: 0, length: mutable.length))
        }
        self.init(attributedString: mutable)
    }

}

alternatively you can use the versions this was derived from and set font on UILabel after setting attributedString

this will clobber the size and boldness encapsulated in the attributestring though

kudos for reading through all the answers up to here. You are a very patient man woman or child.

0

A function to convert html to Attributed NSAttributedString that will adapt dynamic size + adapt accessibility for the text.

static func convertHtml(string: String?) -> NSAttributedString? {
    
    guard let string = string else {return nil}
    
    guard let data = string.data(using: .utf8) else {
        return nil
    }
    
    do {
        let attrStr = try NSAttributedString(data: data,
                                      options: [.documentType: NSAttributedString.DocumentType.html, .characterEncoding: String.Encoding.utf8.rawValue],
                                      documentAttributes: nil)
        let range = NSRange(location: 0, length: attrStr.length)
        let str = NSMutableAttributedString(attributedString: attrStr)
        
        str.enumerateAttribute(NSAttributedString.Key.font, in: NSMakeRange(0, str.length), options: .longestEffectiveRangeNotRequired) {
            (value, range, stop) in
            if let font = value as? UIFont {
                
                let userFont =  UIFontDescriptor.preferredFontDescriptor(withTextStyle: .title2)
                let pointSize = userFont.withSize(font.pointSize)
                let customFont = UIFont.systemFont(ofSize: pointSize.pointSize)
                let dynamicText = UIFontMetrics.default.scaledFont(for: customFont)
                str.addAttribute(NSAttributedString.Key.font,
                                         value: dynamicText,
                                         range: range)
            }
        }

        str.addAttribute(NSAttributedString.Key.underlineStyle, value: 0, range: range)
        
        return NSAttributedString(attributedString: str.attributedSubstring(from: range))
    } catch {}
    return nil
    
}

To use:

let htmToStringText = convertHtml(string: html)
            
  self.bodyTextView.isEditable = false
  self.bodyTextView.isAccessibilityElement = true
  self.bodyTextView.adjustsFontForContentSizeCategory = true
  self.bodyTextView.attributedText = htmToStringText
  self.bodyTextView.accessibilityAttributedLabel = htmToStringText

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