0
    (defn returnLoc [obj-data super-cat]
  ;If the list passed through is not empty
  (if-not (empty? obj-data)
    ;If the super-category passed in (i.e. Fruit/Agent) is equal
    ;to the Super-Category (the second object in the first row)
    (if (= super-cat (nth (first obj-data) 2))
      ;Recurvisely goes through the same process as above,
      ;To see if there is any other records in the list with the same super-cat
      ;then finds the location of the object and conj[oin]'s that to the returned values
      (conj (returnLoc (rest obj-data) super-cat)
            (nth (first obj-data) 3))
      ;If the super-cat passed through is not equal, it does not add it to the list
      ;And recursively goes back through to check if there are any other possible items to add to
      ;the list.
      (returnLoc (rest obj-data) super-cat)
      )
    ())
  )

As you can see I am returning the 3rd value of the obj-data once the code has found a match, is there a way where I can get the 2nd value of obj-data to return with the 3rd each time, and then add a separator on the end of that,

It currently returns a location of an item (fruit/agent) but I want it to return the specific item and location.

So it looks like:

(returnLoc obj-data 'agent)

returns:

=>(hallway bedroom)

where ideally I'd like it to return:

=>(tom is in hallway | jerry is in  bedroom)

Does anyone have a solution on how to do this?

3

If you make your solution more idiomatic, your immediate problems disappear:

  1. Represent each element of obj-data as a map (or record), not as a list.
  2. Recognise the pattern of the returnLoc computation.

1. Represent each element of obj-data as a map (or record), not as a list.

Your desired solution might then be

[{:who 'Tom, :where 'hallway} {:who 'Jerry, :where 'bedroom}]

This is quite readable, so you needn't hurry to translate it into flat text.

2. Recognise the pattern of the returnLoc computation.

What does returnLoc do?

  • It selects the elements of obj-data that have a particular
    characeristic: their :where value is super-cat. This is a filter operation.
  • It extracts the :who attribute from all such elements. This is a map operation.

Your returnLoc function might then be

(defn returnLoc [obj-data super-cat]
  (map
    :who
    (filter
      #(= (:where %) super-cat)
      obj-data)))

... or, using a threading macro,

(defn returnLoc [obj-data super-cat]
  (->> obj-data
       (filter #(= (:where %) super-cat))
       (map :who)))
  • The keywords :who and :where are used as accessor functions.
  • These versions maintain the order of the elements in obj-data. Your code reverses it.

Since you want to keep both the :who and :where fields, why not simply return the whole map/record:

(defn returnLoc [obj-data super-cat]
  (filter
    #(= (:where %) super-cat)
    obj-data))

This saves work, as the immutable map is returned by reference. No new map need be constructed.

If you are determined to get rid of the other fields, use select-keys:

(defn returnLoc [obj-data super-cat]
  (->> obj-data
       (filter #(= (:where %) super-cat))
       (map #(select-keys % [:who :where]))))
| improve this answer | |
1

conj takes more than one element to be added to the collection:

(conj '(on this list) 'elements 'two)
; ==> (two elements on this list)
| improve this answer | |
-1

Figured out my own solution that works:

(def obj-data
              '((apple#3 apple fruit kitchen)
                 (mango#5 mango fruit kitchen)
                 (tom cat agent hallway)
                 (jerry mouse agent bedroom)
                 (matthew JavaStudentMatthew student livesAtHome)
                 (tom NetworkStudentTom student newcastleHome)
                 (Nathan NetworkStudentNathan student middlesbroughHome)
                 (Jack NetworkStudentJack student kexgillHome)
                 ))

(defn returnLoc [obj-data super-cat]
  ;If the list passed through is not empty
  (if-not (empty? obj-data)
    ;If the super-category passed in (i.e. Fruit/Agent) is equal
    ;to the Super-Category (the second object in the first row)
    (if (= super-cat (nth (first obj-data) 2))
      ;Recurvisely goes through the same process as above,
      ;To see if there is any other records in the list with the same super-cat
      ;then finds the location of the object and conj[oin]'s that to the returned values
      (cons (list (nth (first obj-data) 1) " is in " (nth (first obj-data) 3))
      (returnLoc (rest obj-data) super-cat))
      ;If the super-cat passed through is not equal, it does not add it to the list
      ;And recursively goes back through to check if there are any other possible items to add to
      ;the list.
      (returnLoc (rest obj-data) super-cat)
      )
    ())
  )
| improve this answer | |

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