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I've got a resource that is shared across potentially many processes and needs to be cleaned up when no longer in use.

What's the easiest way in C# to maintain a usage count across processes so that the resource may be cleaned up when no longer used?

(If the last process to use the resources dies, it is ok to leave the resource unfreed so long as the next to use has a valid usage count).

  • "resource" doesn't mean anything, you have to be specific. – Hans Passant Feb 11 '17 at 19:27
  • the resource is irrelevant. imagine there is an arbitrary system command run to create the resource and one to destroy it. i need to manage the lifetime based on it be in use (cross-process). – CoderBrien Feb 11 '17 at 19:41
  • Lifetime ends when all processes dies. So, you basicaly has no solution, but to create some manager which will monitor all of your processes in any possible way (they sends heartbit packets or you ping them - doesn't matter) and will manage this resource lifetime accordingly. You can use Windows Service for this task. Or you can create semaphore inside resource and last process which decreases it - will dispose off resource. But this approach is not reliable because I can shut down your computer - and resource will live for eternity. – eocron Feb 11 '17 at 19:43
  • no. i want the process that releases it to free it when it is no longer in use. the usage does not correspond to the process lifetime. – CoderBrien Feb 11 '17 at 19:45
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You are describing a pattern implemented in .net remoting, where the consumer of a resource may be on a different machine. This works by forcing the consumer to release the object explicitly, backed up with a Lifetime Lease which automatically times the consumer out if they have not refreshed the lease.

Given that all of this is already in the .net framework I'd recommend using remoting to generate your framework.

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  • care to share some sample code? i haven't used remoting much. – CoderBrien Feb 11 '17 at 19:58
  • Although its pretty old now (replaced by WCF) the remoting library pattern is simply the structure of having a factory (to create and recycle instances of the resource), a registry (used by the factory to keep track of instances generated and leased, with the lease expiry time) and a method of the consumer explictly releasing (via a method call) or renewing the lease. You could easily use the .net Memory Cache classes to implement the release, renewal and expiry element of this. – PhillipH Feb 11 '17 at 20:06
  • this sounds really complex. was hoping to find something in 10-20 lines of code at max. taking a stab at memorymappedfiles/mutexes which i think may do the trick. – CoderBrien Feb 11 '17 at 20:13
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If all processes are on the same machine, I'd create a file that contains the instance count. When the resource is provisioned by a process, the file should be opened for writing, effectively locking the file. The instance count should be read and incremented, then the write lock released on the file.

When a process exits (or is done with the resource), grab a write lock to the file and decrement the resource count. If the resource count is zero after the decrement, then initiate your cleanup procedure.

You will have to have retry logic in case a second process tries to grab a write lock on the shared file while the file is already open for writing by another process.

The important point is that the OS can give you an exclusive write lock, which is effectively your critical section.

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  • that's an idea, but doesn't deal with a hard process exit and doing so seems like it's going to be way more complex than it should (eg maintain list of PIDs or system mutex names). yuck. – CoderBrien Feb 11 '17 at 19:52
  • Just create some monitor process and it will clean up on processCount=0 even if your processes died horrible death. – eocron Feb 11 '17 at 19:57
  • Yeah, those hard exits (someone kills the process or pulls the power cord) are going to suck to deal with. The other way I've seen is to have a separate application that has a critical section, serializes the count to disk, and increments or decrements via RPCs. You could implement periodic polling from such a process to check to make sure that all processes who have registered as using the resource are still active. It's been a long time (so my memory is fuzzy) but the same problem existed back in the old COM Component days. I don't recall how it was solved back then. – Rob Reagan Feb 11 '17 at 19:57
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The code I used:

internal sealed class InterProcessResource {
    private static readonly string MutexNameThisProcess = "IPR-" + Guid.NewGuid().ToString();
    private static readonly Mutex MutexThisProcess = new Mutex(true, MutexNameThisProcess);

    private readonly MemoryMappedFile mmf;
    private readonly string mutexName;

    public InterProcessResource(string resourceName) {
        this.mutexName = resourceName + "-mtx";
        this.mmf = MemoryMappedFile.CreateOrOpen(resourceName + "-mmf", 16 * 1024, MemoryMappedFileAccess.ReadWrite);
    }


    public void Acquire(Action initAction) {
        using (new Mutex(true, this.mutexName)) {
            var currentList = ReadStringList(mmf);
            if (currentList.Count == 0) {
                initAction();
            }
            var newList = PruneMutexList(currentList);
            newList.Add(MutexNameThisProcess);
            WriteStringList(this.mmf, newList);
        }
    }

    public void Release(Action freeAction) {
        using (new Mutex(true, this.mutexName)) {
            var currentList = ReadStringList(this.mmf);
            var newList = PruneMutexList(currentList);
            WriteStringList(this.mmf, newList);
            if (newList.Count == 0) {
                freeAction();
            }
        }
    }

    private static List<string> ReadStringList(MemoryMappedFile mmf) {
        var list = new List<string>();
        using (var stream = mmf.CreateViewStream()) {
            var reader = new BinaryReader(stream);
            int count = reader.ReadInt32();
            for (int i = 0; i < count; i++) {
                list.Add(reader.ReadString());
            }
        }
        return list;
    }

    private static void WriteStringList(MemoryMappedFile mmf, List<string> newList) {
        using (var stream = mmf.CreateViewStream()) {
            var writer = new BinaryWriter(stream);
            int count = newList.Count;
            writer.Write(count);
            for (int i = 0; i < count; i++) {
                writer.Write(newList[i]);
            }
        }
    }

    // removes our mutex name AND any dead processes mutex names
    private static List<string> PruneMutexList(List<string> list) {
        var newList = new List<string>();
        foreach (var s in list) {
            if (s != MutexNameThisProcess) {
                Mutex m;
                if (Mutex.TryOpenExisting(s, out m)) {
                    newList.Add(s);
                    m.Dispose();
                }
            }
        }
        return newList;
    }
}
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