4

It is said volatile is needed for signal handler, e.g.,

volatile int flag = 1; // volatile is needed here?

void run() {
    while(flag) { /* do someting... */ }
}

void signal_handler(int sig) {
    flag = 0;
}

int main() {
    signal(SIGINT, sig_handler);
    run();
    // ...
}

It is said volatile is often not used in multithreading. But how about the similar case like above in multithreading:

int flag = 1; // is volatile needed here?

void thread_function() {
    while(flag) { /* do someting... */ }
}

int main() {
    // pthread_create() to create thread_function()...
    sleep(10); // let thread_function run for 10 seconds
    flag = 0;
    // ...
}

Should the volatile keyword be used in both cases? Are the two cases treated the same way by compiler?

2
  • 1
    volatile is [usually] insufficient for interthread operations (e.g. locking, ring queue indexes, etc). But, your usage here is for a "run" flag. Only 1 writer (main). And, in both cases, it should be volatile. In the second case, assume the thread func is while (flag) do_stuff();, main clearing flag is a "gentle" way to tell threads to exit their loops, do cleanup, and exit. You could combine 1st and 2nd and have the signal handler clear flag for the threads. Much beyond this for threads needs pthread_mutex_t et. al., etc. Feb 11 '17 at 23:35
  • I would use a std::atomic_flag (which is always lock-free on every system) or a std::atomic_signal_fence. volatile only forces the compiler to read and write from the specified memory location instead of optimizing the value out. The memory location could also just be the cache. volatile` does not prevent the compiler from reordering your code. Sep 16 '20 at 1:55
9

The only non-local values you are allowed to modify from a signal handler are those of type volatile sig_atomic_t, and atomic types. In particular, writing to your volatile int is not allowed, and if your signal handler runs you have undefined behaviour.

7
  • 2
    Useful, if slightly tangential, addition: while you are not allowed very much in the context of a signal handler, you can write() to a file descriptor. That's often the most useful way to get word of the 'event' out to your main program logic. Linux even offers a convenient signalfd API for precisely that usage pattern (i.e. instead of writing your signal handlers which explicitly forward the event, register a signalfd to read the events from).
    – user268396
    Feb 11 '17 at 23:49
  • Are you allowed to modify atomic types other than sig_atomic_t? I thought it was the only one; otherwise, why would it be necessary at all?
    – rici
    Feb 12 '17 at 0:10
  • Atomic types have to be lock-free for signal handlers, but which they usually are if the base type is a standard integer type. Feb 12 '17 at 0:15
  • @rici, other than the name indicates sig_atomic_t is not an atomic type, unfortunately. It predates C11 and the introduction of threads and atomics and must be provided by all C platforms, whereas threads and atomics are optional. Feb 12 '17 at 0:18
  • 2
    GNU says: "In practice, you can assume that int is atomic. You can also assume that pointer types are atomic; that is very convenient. Both of these assumptions are true on all of the machines that the GNU C Library supports and on all POSIX systems we know of." gnu.org/software/libc/manual/html_node/Atomic-Types.html I think this means that it's OK to read/write a volatile int or volatile char* in a signal handler on such a system. (But according to the spec, it's still undefined behavior, and it may lead to problems on other systems.) Sep 23 '19 at 23:25
3

The c++ standard, in [intro.execution], paragraph 6, tells:

When the processing of the abstract machine is interrupted by receipt of a signal, the values of objects which are neither
— of type volatile std::sig_atomic_t nor
— lock-free atomic objects (29.4)
are unspecified during the execution of the signal handler, and the value of any object not in either of these two categories that is modified by the handler becomes undefined.

Therefore, yes, for signal handlers, you have to use volatile std::sig_atomic_t.

2

volatile is used to make sure that the contents of the variable is read from its actual location (memory, in our case) rather than from a CPU register.

In other words, whenever an "outside" event might change the value of a variable, you should consider using volatile ("outside" - as in, outside the relevant code block).

In both your examples, you are using the variable as a flag to signal a change in behavior. This flag, in both examples, is controlled by events "outside" the loop that that is reviewing the flag. For this reason, both examples require the use of the volatile keyword.

It should be noted volatile does not provide thread safety for a number of reasons. To make sure an object is thread safe, read/write operations must be either protected or atomic.

9
  • 1
    ...and when read/write operations are protected or atomic, you no longer need volatile
    – M.M
    Feb 12 '17 at 1:58
  • @M.M - Although that's true it's still good practice to use volatile with protected operations. Although C11 atomic variables are always read from memory rather than CPU (when using atomic_load), variables that are changed within a lock are "implied" to be volatile... but optimizations can do funny things when the data is read outside of the lock, such as in the OPs examples.
    – Myst
    Feb 12 '17 at 5:19
  • C's volatile has nothing to do with memory. You're thinking of Java. C's volatile prohibits the compiler from optimizing away any accesses and also prohibits reordering with respect to other operations that have visible side effects. Sep 15 '20 at 17:29
  • @PaulJ.Lucas there's an explanation here, but in general, the rules of the abstract machine require memory read/write to the volatile object. From the standard: "An object that has volatile-qualified type may be modified in ways unknown to the implementation or have other unknown side effects. Therefore any expression referring to such an object shall be evaluated strictly according to the rules of the abstract machine" ... so I think it answers the question about flags in multi-threading code.
    – Myst
    Sep 15 '20 at 17:45
  • @Myst Nothing in either the linked-to page nor in what you wrote specifically says that all volatile accesses must read from or write to main memory. Sep 15 '20 at 23:59

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