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I'm studying Ruby and trying to wrap my head around some vocabulary. Somewhere I picked up the notion that a setter notion is also a virtual method, i.e., they're synonyms. But now I'm thinking I was wrong. And I'm wondering what relationship these bear to factory methods. Help?

Wikipedia says this about virtual methods:

In object-oriented programming, in languages such as C++, a virtual function or virtual method is an inheritable and overridable function or method for which dynamic dispatch is facilitated.

I've been studying Ruby diligently since last June and I have no idea what that means.

I do have a little better notion of what setter methods are. I've been thinking that it is just any method that sets the value of an instance variable. So attr_writer :foo is a setter method, and maybe a method external to a class that changes the value of foo would also be a setter method. Is that right?

But that's not what "virtual method" means, is it? So basically, I'm looking for an explanation of the differences and I can't find any (or, not that I can understand).

It's also the case, isn't it, that a so-called "factory method" could be described as method to create an object of a particular type, as specified by a collection of setter methods, from outside of the class (i.e., the code defining the class)?

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Somewhere I picked up the notion that a setter notion is also a virtual method, i.e., they're synonyms.

That is a logical error: a Dog is also a Mammal, but that does not mean that they are synonyms.

Likewise, in Ruby, setter methods are also virtual methods (because in Ruby all methods are virtual), but they are not synonyms. Since there are only virtual methods in Ruby, you could just as well say: setter methods are also methods. Now, it should become obvious that this does not necessarily mean that methods are also setter methods, right?

Wikipedia says this about virtual methods:

In object-oriented programming, in languages such as C++, a virtual function or virtual method is an inheritable and overridable function or method for which dynamic dispatch is facilitated.

The term makes no sense in Ruby, because in Ruby, all methods are virtual, so there is no need to distinguish virtual from non-virtual methods.

In OOP in general, the term "virtual" applies to language-"things" that are dispatched dynamically (i.e. at runtime) and can be overridden.

class Foo
  def to_s
    foo
  end

  def foo
    'Foo'
  end
end

class Bar < Foo
  def foo
    'Bar'
  end
end

Bar.new.to_s
#=> 'Bar'

As you can see, Bar.new.to_s returns the string 'Bar', even though to_s is defined in Foo and simply calls foo. However, even though to_s is defined in Foo, it does not call Foo's foo, it calls Bar's foo, because the object in question has class Bar. Bar has overridden the definition of foo with its own, and the call was dispatched dynamically to whatever class the current object has.

Alan Kay, who coined the term "object oriented" used a messaging metaphor, that IMHO makes things like this much easier to understand: objects communicate with each other by sending messages. And it works just like when you send someone a message in the real world: you can't know what the receiver does with the message, all you can observe is the response you get. And when you send someone a message, then they will interpret the request in the message according to their own knowledge.

So, if you imagine this exchange between you and your friend:

  1. You send the message "convert yourself to a string" to a friend.
  2. Your friend doesn't know what that means, so he asks his superior, and he tells him, it means "send yourself the message 'foo'".
  3. Your friend sends himself the message "foo".
  4. Your friend has his own idea of what "foo" means, so he doesn't need to look it up.

Other languages have other virtual "things", e.g. Newspeak has virtual superclasses.

So, if I have this:

class Foo < Array
  # … stuff
end

class Bar
  def Array
    return SomeClassLikeArray
  end

  def bar
    Foo.new
  end
end

Bar.new.bar
# this will be a `Foo` which has `SomeClassLikeArray` as its superclass

I do have a little better notion of what setter methods are. I've been thinking that it is just any method that sets the value of an instance variable.

Yes and no.

It is a method that appears to set an instance variable. You don't actually know what that method does. (Remember the messaging metaphor: you can only observe your friend's response, you don't know what your friend actually does with the message!)

For example, in a web framework, a setter method may actually write to the database instead of setting an instance variable.

At a more technical note, in general, in Ruby, a setter method is a method whose name ends with =.

So attr_writer :foo is a setter method,

No, that's not a setter method. It creates a setter method named foo=.

and maybe a method external to a class that changes the value of foo would also be a setter method. Is that right?

That's not what we generally call a setter method. It's also simply not possible in Ruby, since only the object itself has access to its instance variables.

And even in languages that allow it, it is bad design: objects should do stuff, not store stuff. It is about behavior. You should tell objects to perform actions.

But that's not what "virtual method" means, is it? So basically, I'm looking for an explanation of the differences and I can't find any (or, not that I can understand).

It doesn't really make sense to talk about their differences since the two concepts are completely orthogonal; they don't have anything to do with each other.

A virtual method is a method that can be overridden. A setter method is a method that sets stuff. You can have a setter method that can be overridden, a setter method that cannot be overridden, a non-setter method that can be overridden, and a non-setter method that cannot be overridden.

Specifically in Ruby, all methods are virtual, so all setter methods are virtual (because all setter methods are methods), but that's it.

It's also the case, isn't it, that a so-called "factory method" could be described as method to create an object of a particular type, as specified by a collection of setter methods, from outside of the class (i.e., the code defining the class)?

So, there is a Design Pattern called Factory Method, but you are talking about the more general concept of a method that creates objects.

Yes, a method that creates objects is sometimes called "Factory Method". In Ruby, the most widely-used factory method is new, which looks something like this:

class Class
  def new(*args, &block)
    obj = allocate
    obj.initialize(*args, &block)
    return obj
  end
end

Actually, initialize is a private method, so we need to use reflection to circumvent the access protection, but that doesn't change the gist of the method:

class Class
  def new(*args, &block)
    obj = allocate
    obj.__send__(:initialize, *args, &block)
    return obj
  end
end
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  • +100 upvotes for mentioning Alan Kay, message passing and Gilad Bracha's Newspeak! Maybe preface the Newspeak example with a disclaimer that this is not valid Ruby code though? – akuhn Feb 13 '17 at 3:58
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Virtual method

Method, defined on a class, and redefined on it’s subclass, so that the dispatch relates on what type receiver is of. Example:

class A; def m; puts "A"; end; end
class B < A; def m; puts "B"; end; end
class C < A; end
[A, B, C].map(&:new).each(&:m)
#⇒ "A"
#  "B"
#  "A"

That said, whether one has an object, she should not bother with type checking while she is certain, the object is an instance of any class, derived from A. If the method is not defined on this particular class, the whole inheritance tree is being looked up until the method definition is found and that found method is being called.

Setter method

First of all, attr_writer is by no means the setter. It is a helper to dynamically produce the setter. The setter itself is, accordingly to it’s name, is a method, that does set [a variable]. The opposite would be a getter.

class A; def set(v); @v = v; end; def get; @v; end; end
instance = A.new
instance.set(42)
instance.get
#⇒ 42

Factory method

It [usually] produces instances. Factories might be declared within a class definitions (that is widely used in singletons and like):

class A
  def m; puts "A"; end
  # note A.produce, to make it a class method
  def A.produce; A.new; end
  # or self.produce, to make it a class method
  # def self.produce; A.new; end # ⇐ the same as above
end
A.produce
#⇒ #<A:××××××>
A.produce.m
#⇒ "A"

or outside of the class definition:

class A; def m; puts "A"; end; end
def produceA; A.new; end
# or from withing other class
class B; def produceA; A.new; end; end

produceA.m
#⇒ 42
B.new.produceA.m
#⇒ 42

Please also check the very valuable comment on attr_writer by Cary Swoveland below.

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  • 1
    Excellent answer, Mudsie! Perhaps I can elaborate the method Module::attr_writer. Being a class method, attr_writer is executed when the class definition is parsed. It merely creates an instance method name= (:name being attr_writer's argument) which "sets" the value of the instance variable @name. The instance method it creates (a setter) is def name=(str); @name = str; end. So attr_writer is a helper method that automates a common task that you otherwise would have to do manually. – Cary Swoveland Feb 12 '17 at 6:01
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All methods in Ruby are "virtual."

I use quotes since there is no such distinction in Ruby. The concepts discussed in that wikipedia article make sense for C++ only and are not applicable to Ruby. For example, Ruby doesn't have constructors either.

And your intuition is right, a "factory method" must call setter methods or delegate the initialization to an instance method since instance variables are strictly private in Ruby.

In fact, new is one such factory method, which delegates the initialization to an instance method named initialize. It is implemented in native code and does the equivalent of

class Object 
  def self.new
    object = allocate
    object.initialize # delegate initialization to an instance method
    return object
  end
end
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  • Technically one could use instance_variable_set, so instance variables are not strictly private. Though I appreciate that this is only t tangentially relevant for factory methods, but you could use it to "configure" an object instance without setters. – Michael Kohl Feb 12 '17 at 16:04

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