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I'm working on an Anti-Theft app. Supposing that my phone is stolen, the first thing a thief will do is factory reset it, what means all apps and data will be lost.

I can convert my app to a System App and it will probably "survive" a hard reset but its data will be lost. Is there a way to keep the app and its data after a reset?

If it's not possible to keep its data, I thought I could store its settings in a file, but it would be erased too. Is there also a way to keep a file after a reset?

Edit: I don't want its data. I want its data not be erased after a factory reset cause erasing its data means erasing all user settings. Since I'm developing an anti-theft app, if a thief resets it, the app should keep its data (user data like a email and phone number) to contact the owner even after a reset made by the thief...

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Why do you want a copy of the data after it's stolen (????). May be you have a use case. Anyways, if you are basing your app on API level 23 and above, you can have a look at this - https://developer.android.com/guide/topics/data/autobackup.html

This kind of automatically does what you wanted to achieve.The backed up data is on Google drive of the user account but it's of no use unless restored. Funny thing is, the autobackup feature would actually restore this data after the app is installed again (and the same user has logged in).

This will not really help if you don't have the phone (i mean if it's stolen :)). But if you want to persist app data across app uninstalls and factory reset, autobackup would do the trick for you (available only on API level 23 and above)

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  • I don't want its data. I just want its data not be erased aftar a reset. It's an anti-theft app, so if a thief reset it, the app should keep its data (user data like a email and phone number) to contact the owner even after a reset made by the thief... – Maycow Moura Feb 13 '17 at 5:26
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It is possible to recover data once a mobile is factory reset or so was uncovered by some Cambridge University researchers in the paper titled Security Analysis of Android Factory Resets published in 2015. I haven't had much time to go through it, but it looks promising.

It seems they did manage to get master tokens even after factory reset by utilizing some flaw in android system where the composition of flash drives make them dangerously hard to erase. Seems something you can experiment with depending on the usage. Do go through it once.

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