4

The code below generates a compiler warning:

private void test()
{
    byte buffer[100];
    for (int i = 0; i < sizeof(buffer); ++i)
    {
        buffer[i] = 0;
    }
}

warning: comparison between signed and unsigned integer expressions [-Wsign-compare]

This is because sizeof() returns a size_t, which is unsigned.

I have seen a number of suggestions for how to deal with this, but none with a preponderance of support and none with any convincing logic nor any references to support one approach as clearly "better." The most common suggestions seem to be:

  1. ignore the warnings
  2. turn off the warnings
  3. use a loop variable of type size_t
  4. use a loop variable of type size_t with tricks to avoid decrementing past zero
  5. cast size_of(buffer) to an int
  6. some extremely convoluted suggestions that I did not have the patience to follow because they involved unreadable code, generally involving vectors and/or iterators
  7. libraries that I cannot load in the AVR / ARM embedded environments I often use.
  8. free functions returning a valid int or long representing the byte count of T
  9. Don't use loops (gotta love that advice)

Is there a "correct" way to approach this?

-- Begin Edit --

The example I gave is, of course, trivial, and meant only to demonstrate the type mismatch warning that can occur in an indexing situation.

#3 is not necessarily the obviously correct answer because size_t carries special risks in a decrementing loop such as for (size_t i = myArray.size; i > 0; --i) (the array may someday have a size of zero).

#4 is a suggestion to deal with decrementing size_t indexes by including appropriate and necessary checks to avoid ever decrementing past zero. Since that makes the code harder to read, there are some cute shortcuts that are not particularly readable, hence my referring to them as "tricks."

#7 is a suggestion to use libraries that are not generalizable in the sense that they may not be available or appropriate in every setting.

#8 is a suggestion to keep the checks readable, but to hide them in a non-member method, sometimes referred to as a "free function."

#9 is a suggestion to use algorithms rather than loops. This was offered many times as a solution to the size_t indexing problem, and there were a lot of upvotes. I include it even though I can't use the stl library in most of my environments and would have to write the code myself.

-- End Edit--

I am hoping for evidence-based guidance or references as to best practices for handling something like this. Is there a "standard text" or a style guide somewhere that addresses the question? A defined approach that has been adopted/endorsed internally by a major tech company? An emulatable solution forthcoming in a new language release? If necessary, I would be satisfied with an unsupported public recommendation from a single widely recognized expert.

None of the options on offer seem very appealing. The warnings drown out other things I want to see. I don't want to miss signed/unsigned comparisons in places where it might matter. Decrementing a loop variable of type size_t with comparison >=0 results in an infinite loop from unsigned integer wraparound, and even if we protect against that with something like for (size_t i = sizeof(buffer); i-->0 ;), there are other issues with incrementing/decrementing/comparing to size_t variables. Testing against size_t - 1 will yield a large positive 'oops' number when size_t is unexpectedly zero (e.g. strlen(myEmptyString)). Casting an unsigned size_t to an integer is a container size problem (not guaranteed a value) and of course size_t could potentially be bigger than an int.

Given that my arrays are of known sizes well below Int_Max, it seems to me that casting size_t to a signed integer is the best of the bunch, but it makes me cringe a little bit. Especially if it has to be static_cast<int>. Easier to take if it's hidden in a function call with some size testing, but still...

Or perhaps there's a way to turn off the warnings, but just for loop comparisons?

11
  • You could assign to the size to an int variable. – Barmar Feb 12 '17 at 6:55
  • 4
    Why is use of size_t i = 0; a problem? – R Sahu Feb 12 '17 at 7:02
  • 2
    for (const auto &element : buffer) { ... } – Jesper Juhl Feb 12 '17 at 7:12
  • 1
    "some extremely convoluted suggestions that I did not have the patience to follow, generally involving vectors and/or iterators" Welcome back to the 20th century. – n. 1.8e9-where's-my-share m. Feb 12 '17 at 7:50
  • 2
    Authoritative? No. But array indexes are by nature unsigned. A negative index is meaningless. So, use unsigned values. The only difficulty is when counting down to zero, in that case a little care is needed. – Zan Lynx Feb 12 '17 at 7:50
3

The most appropriate solution will depend entirely on context. In the context of the code fragment in your question the most appropriate action is perhaps to have type-agreement - the third option in your bullet list. This is appropriate in this case because the usage of i throughout the code is only to index the array - in this case the use of int is inappropriate - or at least unnecessary.

On the other hand if i were an arithmetic object involved in some arithmetic expression that was itself signed, the int might be appropriate and a cast would be in order.

I would suggest that as a guideline, a solution that involves the fewest number of necessary type casts (explicit of implicit) is appropriate, or to look at it another way, the maximum possible type agreement. There is not one "authoritative" rule because the purpose and usage of the variables involved is semantically rather then syntactically dependent. In this case also as has been pointed out in other answers, newer language features supporting iteration may avoid this specific issue altogether.

To discuss the advice you say you have been given specifically:

  • ignore the warnings

Never a good idea - some will be genuine semantic errors or maintenance issues, and by teh time you have several hundred warnings you are ignoring, how will you spot the one warning that is and issue?

  • turn off the warnings

An even worse idea; the compiler is helping you to improve your code quality and reliability. Why would you disable that?

  • use a loop variable of type size_t

In this precise example, that is exactly why you should do; exact type agreement should always be the aim.

  • use a loop variable of type size_t with tricks to avoid decrementing past zero

This advice is irrelevant for the trivial example given. Moreover I presume that by "tricks" the adviser in fact means checks or just correct code. There is no need for "tricks" and the term is entirely ambiguous - who knows what the adviser means? It suggests something unconventional and a bit "dirty", when there is not need for any solution with such attributes.

  • cast size_of(buffer) to an int

This may be necessary if the usage of i warrants the use of int for correct semantics elsewhere in the code. The example in the question does not, so this would not be an appropriate solution in this case. Essentially if making i a size_t here causes type agreement warnings elsewhere that cannot themselves be resolved by universal type agreement for all operands in an expression, then a cast may be appropriate. The aim should be to achieve zero warnings an minimum type casts.

  • some extremely convoluted suggestions that I did not have the patience to follow, generally involving vectors and/or iterators

If you are not prepared to elaborate or even consider such advice, you'd have better omitted the "advice" from your question. The use of STL containers in any case is not always appropriate to a large segment of embedded targets in any case, excessive code size increase and non-deterministic heap management are reasons to avoid on many platforms and applications.

  • libraries that I cannot load in an embedded environment.

Not all embedded environments have equal constraints. The restriction is on your embedded environment, not by any means all embedded environments. However the "loading of libraries" to resolve or avoid type agreement issues seems like a sledgehammer to crack a nut.

  • free functions returning a valid int or long representing the byte count of T

It is not clear what that means. What id a "free function"? Is that just a non-member function? Such a function would internally necessarily have a type case, so what have you achieved other than hiding a type cast?

  • Don't use loops (gotta love that advice).

I doubt you needed to include that advice in your list. The problem is not in any case limited to loops; it is not because you are using a loop that you have the warning, it is because you have used < with mismatched types.

1
  • I've edited the question to clarify some of the good points you raised. Yes, a free function is a non-member function. I included "convoluted suggestions" merely to indicate awareness that a number of SO questions resulted in answers suggesting the inclusion of up to 100 lines of barely-readable code to address type mismatch. If I understand you correctly, you believe that in the trivial example given I should use a size_t indexing variable, and in other situations a different approach might be preferred. Did I get that right? – Craig.Feied Feb 14 '17 at 21:52
4

I find any of the three following approaches equally good.

  1. Use a variable of type int to store the size and compare the loop variable to it.

    byte buffer[100];
    int size = sizeof(buffer);
    for (int i = 0; i < size; ++i)
    {
        buffer[i] = 0;
    }
    
  2. Use size_t as the type of the loop variable.

    byte buffer[100];
    for (size_t i = 0; i < sizeof(buffer); ++i)
    {
        buffer[i] = 0;
    }
    
  3. Use a pointer.

    byte buffer[100];
    byte* end = buffer + sizeof(buffer)
    for (byte* p = buffer; p < end; ++p)
    {
        *p = 0;
    }
    

If you are able to use a C++11 compiler, you can also use a range for loop.

byte buffer[100];
for (byte& b : buffer)
{
    b = 0;
}
6
  • Won't int size = sizeof(buffer); cause compiler warnings? – stijn Feb 12 '17 at 8:05
  • It could, depending on the compiler. g++ -Wall does not. – R Sahu Feb 12 '17 at 8:07
  • 1
    It might be worth mentioning, that idiomatic C++ approach (standard library style) is to use iterators (pointers for arrays) to represent ranges. – Revolver_Ocelot Feb 12 '17 at 8:09
  • @Revolver_Ocelot, I don't think that adds much value to the answer. – R Sahu Feb 12 '17 at 8:25
  • Solution 1 is no better than a cast. – Brandin Feb 12 '17 at 12:48
2

My favorite solution is to use C++11 or newer and skip the whole manual size bounding entirely like so:

// assuming byte is defined by something like using byte = std::uint8_t;

void test()
{
    byte buffer[100];
    for (auto&& b: buffer)
    {
        b = 0;
    }
}

Alternatively, if I can't use the ranged-based for loop (but still can use C++11 or newer), my favorite syntax becomes:

void test()
{
    byte buffer[100];
    for (auto i = decltype(sizeof(buffer)){0}; i < sizeof(buffer); ++i)
    {
        buffer[i] = 0;
    }
}

Or for iterating backwards:

void test()
{
    byte buffer[100];
    // relies on the defined modwrap semantics behavior for unsigned integers
    for (auto i = sizeof(buffer) - 1; i < sizeof(buffer); --i)
    {
        buffer[i] = 0;
    }
}
4
  • Your first suggestion appears to be of the type "Use algorithms instead of loops," and the second one is of course interesting if slightly cumbersome. It still leaves me with the issue of iterating backwards and the need for additional checks (because an unsigned int fails to terminate the loop when decremented and tested for >= zero). How do you handle that situation? – Craig.Feied Feb 14 '17 at 22:19
  • @Craig.Feied Thanks for the comment. I've updated my answer to include code for iterating backwards (without using range-based for-loop syntax which can also iterate backwards). – Louis Langholtz Feb 15 '17 at 1:47
  • That's helpful, though it basically becomes #3. I still have the problem that if the buffer size is zero this becomes an infinite loop... – Craig.Feied Feb 17 '17 at 8:02
  • Oops, misread the syntax and missed the edit timeout --- this seems good. – Craig.Feied Feb 17 '17 at 8:08
1

The correct generic way is to use a loop iterator of type size_t. Simply because the is the most correct type to use for describing an array size.

There is not much need for "tricks to avoid decrementing past zero", because the size of an object can never be negative.

If you find yourself needing negative numbers to describe a variable size, it is probably because you have some special case where you are iterating across an array backwards. If so, the "trick" to deal with it is this:

for(size_t i=0; i<sizeof(array); i++)
{
  size_t index = sizeof(array)-1 - i;
  array[index] = something;
}

However, size_t is often an inconvenient type to use in embedded systems, because it may end up as a larger type than what your MCU can handle with one instruction, resulting in needlessly inefficient code. It may then be better to use a fixed width integer such as uint16_t, if you know the maximum size of the array in advance.

Using plain int in an embedded system is almost certainly incorrect practice. Your variables must be of deterministic size and signedness - most variables in an embedded system are unsigned. Signed variables also lead to major problems whenever you need to use bitwise operators.

1
  • LOL this is exactly the problem I'm trying to resolve: first I'm swayed by your argument that it's best to use the correct type for describing an array size. Then I see another very interesting way to avoid wrapping when iterating downwards. Then a good suggestion that in an embedded system perhaps I should cast to a specific uintxx_t. All good stuff, but I'm still stuck with "it depends." – Craig.Feied Feb 14 '17 at 22:06
0

If you are able to use C++ 11, you could use decltype to obtain the actual type of what sizeof returns, for instance:

void test()
{
    byte buffer[100];
    // On macOS decltype(sizeof(buffer)) returns unsigned long, this passes
    // the compiler without warnings.
    for (decltype(sizeof(buffer)) i = 0; i < sizeof(buffer); ++i)
    {
        buffer[i] = 0;
    }
}

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