2

find -execdir is recommended over -exec, which the manual says has unavoidable security issues, and lists in the bugs section.

man find says regarding -execdir:

If you use this option, you must ensure that your $PATH environment variable does not reference .; otherwise, an attacker can run any commands they like by leaving an appropriately- named file in a directory in which you will run -execdir. The same applies to having entries in $PATH which are empty or which are not absolute directory names.

In a bash script, how does one comply with the manual's "must" and remove all relative or empty elements from $PATH?

1

You can sanitize your PATH using the following bash function:

sanitize_PATH()
{
    local new_path=""
    local dir
    while read -r -d: dir
    do
        if [[ $dir == /* ]]
        then
            new_path="$new_path:$dir"
        else
            echo "dropping from PATH: '$dir'"
        fi
    done <<< "$PATH:"
    PATH="${new_path#:}"
    echo PATH="$PATH"
}

Testing:

$ PATH=/usr/local/bin:/usr/bin:/bin       sanitize_PATH
PATH=/usr/local/bin:/usr/bin:/bin

$ PATH=:/usr/local/bin:/usr/bin:/bin      sanitize_PATH
dropping from PATH: ''
PATH=/usr/local/bin:/usr/bin:/bin

$ PATH=/usr/local/bin:/usr/bin:/bin:      sanitize_PATH
dropping from PATH: ''
PATH=/usr/local/bin:/usr/bin:/bin

$ PATH=/usr/local/bin:/usr/bin:/bin:      sanitize_PATH
dropping from PATH: ''
PATH=/usr/local/bin:/usr/bin:/bin

$ PATH=.:bin:/usr/local/bin:/usr/bin:/bin sanitize_PATH
dropping from PATH: '.'
dropping from PATH: 'bin'
PATH=/usr/local/bin:/usr/bin:/bin

$ PATH=/usr/local/bin::/usr/bin:/bin      sanitize_PATH
dropping from PATH: ''
PATH=/usr/local/bin:/usr/bin:/bin

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