123

I'm writing tests for a function like next one:

def foo():
    print 'hello world!'

So when I want to test this function the code will be like this:

import sys
from foomodule import foo
def test_foo():
    foo()
    output = sys.stdout.getline().strip() # because stdout is an StringIO instance
    assert output == 'hello world!'

But if I run nosetests with -s parameter the test crashes. How can I catch the output with unittest or nose module?

1

13 Answers 13

131

I use this context manager to capture output. It ultimately uses the same technique as some of the other answers by temporarily replacing sys.stdout. I prefer the context manager because it wraps all the bookkeeping into a single function, so I don't have to re-write any try-finally code, and I don't have to write setup and teardown functions just for this.

import sys
from contextlib import contextmanager
from StringIO import StringIO

@contextmanager
def captured_output():
    new_out, new_err = StringIO(), StringIO()
    old_out, old_err = sys.stdout, sys.stderr
    try:
        sys.stdout, sys.stderr = new_out, new_err
        yield sys.stdout, sys.stderr
    finally:
        sys.stdout, sys.stderr = old_out, old_err

Use it like this:

with captured_output() as (out, err):
    foo()
# This can go inside or outside the `with` block
output = out.getvalue().strip()
self.assertEqual(output, 'hello world!')

Furthermore, since the original output state is restored upon exiting the with block, we can set up a second capture block in the same function as the first one, which isn't possible using setup and teardown functions, and gets wordy when writing try-finally blocks manually. That ability came in handy when the goal of a test was to compare the results of two functions relative to each other rather than to some precomputed value.

16
  • This has worked really well for me in pep8radius. Recently however, I had used this again and get the following error when printing TypeError: unicode argument expected, got 'str' (the type passed to print (str/unicode) is irrelevant). Oct 11, 2014 at 4:24
  • 10
    Hmmm it may be that in python 2 we want from io import BytesIO as StringIO and in python 3 just from io import StringIO. Seemed to fix the issue in my tests I think. Oct 11, 2014 at 4:39
  • 4
    Ooop, just to finish, apologies for so many messages. Just to clarify for people finding this: python3 use io.StringIO, python 2 use StringIO.StringIO! Thanks again! Oct 11, 2014 at 4:46
  • 1
    Why are all the examples here calling strip() on the unicode returned from StringIO.getvalue()?
    – Palimondo
    Jun 4, 2017 at 11:52
  • 1
    No, @Vedran. This relies on rebinding the name that belongs to sys. With your import statement, you're creating a local variable named stderr that received a copy of the value in sys.stderr. Changes to one are not reflected in the other. Jun 9, 2017 at 17:29
66

If you really want to do this, you can reassign sys.stdout for the duration of the test.

def test_foo():
    import sys
    from foomodule import foo
    from StringIO import StringIO

    saved_stdout = sys.stdout
    try:
        out = StringIO()
        sys.stdout = out
        foo()
        output = out.getvalue().strip()
        assert output == 'hello world!'
    finally:
        sys.stdout = saved_stdout

If I were writing this code, however, I would prefer to pass an optional out parameter to the foo function.

def foo(out=sys.stdout):
    out.write("hello, world!")

Then the test is much simpler:

def test_foo():
    from foomodule import foo
    from StringIO import StringIO

    out = StringIO()
    foo(out=out)
    output = out.getvalue().strip()
    assert output == 'hello world!'
6
  • 12
    Note: Under python 3.x the StringIO class must now be imported from the io module. from io import StringIO works in python 2.6+.
    – Bryan P
    May 8, 2013 at 22:26
  • 3
    If you use from io import StringIO in python 2, you get a TypeError: unicode argument expected, got 'str' when printing.
    – matiasg
    May 14, 2014 at 14:23
  • 9
    Quick note: In python 3.4, you can use the contextlib.redirect_stdout context manager to do this in a way that is exception safe: with redirect_stdout(out):
    – Lucretiel
    Nov 26, 2014 at 22:49
  • 2
    You don't need to do saved_stdout = sys.stdout, you always have a magic ref to this at sys.__stdout__, eg, you only need sys.stdout = sys.__stdout__ in your cleanup. Oct 27, 2015 at 23:04
  • @ThorSummoner Thanks, this just simplified some of my tests... for scuba which I see you've starred....small world! Jan 26, 2016 at 1:17
48

Since version 2.7, you do not need anymore to reassign sys.stdout, this is provided through buffer flag. Moreover, it is the default behavior of nosetest.

Here is a sample failing in non buffered context:

import sys
import unittest

def foo():
    print 'hello world!'

class Case(unittest.TestCase):
    def test_foo(self):
        foo()
        if not hasattr(sys.stdout, "getvalue"):
            self.fail("need to run in buffered mode")
        output = sys.stdout.getvalue().strip() # because stdout is an StringIO instance
        self.assertEquals(output,'hello world!')

You can set buffer through unit2 command line flag -b, --buffer or in unittest.main options. The opposite is achieved through nosetest flag --nocapture.

if __name__=="__main__":   
    assert not hasattr(sys.stdout, "getvalue")
    unittest.main(module=__name__, buffer=True, exit=False)
    #.
    #----------------------------------------------------------------------
    #Ran 1 test in 0.000s
    #
    #OK
    assert not hasattr(sys.stdout, "getvalue")

    unittest.main(module=__name__, buffer=False)
    #hello world!
    #F
    #======================================================================
    #FAIL: test_foo (__main__.Case)
    #----------------------------------------------------------------------
    #Traceback (most recent call last):
    #  File "test_stdout.py", line 15, in test_foo
    #    self.fail("need to run in buffered mode")
    #AssertionError: need to run in buffered mode
    #
    #----------------------------------------------------------------------
    #Ran 1 test in 0.002s
    #
    #FAILED (failures=1)
2
  • Note that this interacts with --nocapture; in particular, if this flag is set, buffered mode will be disabled. So you have the option of either being able to see the output on the terminal, or being able to test that the output is as expected.
    – ijoseph
    Sep 22, 2017 at 18:51
  • 1
    Is it possible to turn this on and off for each test, because this makes debugging very difficult when using something like ipdb.set_trace() ?
    – Lqueryvg
    Nov 5, 2017 at 11:32
40

A lot of these answers failed for me because you can't from StringIO import StringIO in Python 3. Here's a minimum working snippet based on @naxa's comment and the Python Cookbook.

from io import StringIO
from unittest.mock import patch

with patch('sys.stdout', new=StringIO()) as fakeOutput:
    print('hello world')
    self.assertEqual(fakeOutput.getvalue().strip(), 'hello world')
2
  • 5
    I love this one for Python 3, it is clean!
    – Sylhare
    Aug 7, 2018 at 16:03
  • 1
    This was the only solution on this page that worked for me! Thank you. Feb 19, 2020 at 20:21
31

In python 3.5 you can use contextlib.redirect_stdout() and StringIO(). Here's the modification to your code

import contextlib
from io import StringIO
from foomodule import foo

def test_foo():
    temp_stdout = StringIO()
    with contextlib.redirect_stdout(temp_stdout):
        foo()
    output = temp_stdout.getvalue().strip()
    assert output == 'hello world!'
3
  • Great answer! According to the documentation this was added in Python 3.4.
    – Hypercube
    Feb 4, 2019 at 5:13
  • It's 3.4 for redirect_stdout and 3.5 for redirect_stderr. maybe that's where the confusion arose!
    – rbennell
    Jun 7, 2019 at 10:58
  • redirect_stdout() and redirect_stderr() return their input argument. So, with contextlib.redirect_stdout(StringIO()) as temp_stdout: gives you all in one line. Tested with 3.7.1.
    – Adrian W
    Apr 8, 2020 at 11:36
17

I'm only just learning Python and found myself struggling with a similar problem to the one above with unit tests for methods with output. My passing unit test for foo module above has ended up looking like this:

import sys
import unittest
from foo import foo
from StringIO import StringIO

class FooTest (unittest.TestCase):
    def setUp(self):
        self.held, sys.stdout = sys.stdout, StringIO()

    def test_foo(self):
        foo()
        self.assertEqual(sys.stdout.getvalue(),'hello world!\n')
2
  • 5
    You might want to do a sys.stdout.getvalue().strip() and not cheat comparing with \n :)
    – Silviu
    Feb 10, 2014 at 19:44
  • The StringIO module is deprecated. Instead from io import StringIO
    – Edwarric
    Dec 15, 2019 at 16:03
10

Writing tests often shows us a better way to write our code. Similar to Shane's answer, I'd like to suggest yet another way of looking at this. Do you really want to assert that your program outputted a certain string, or just that it constructed a certain string for output? This becomes easier to test, since we can probably assume that the Python print statement does its job correctly.

def foo_msg():
    return 'hello world'

def foo():
    print foo_msg()

Then your test is very simple:

def test_foo_msg():
    assert 'hello world' == foo_msg()

Of course, if you really have a need to test your program's actual output, then feel free to disregard. :)

2
  • 1
    but in this case foo will not be tested... maybe that's a problem Nov 21, 2010 at 4:54
  • 5
    From a testing purist's perspective, perhaps it's a problem. From a practical standpoint, if foo() doesn't do anything but call the print statement, it's probably not a problem.
    – Alison R.
    Nov 21, 2010 at 17:44
5

Based on Rob Kennedy's answer, I wrote a class-based version of the context manager to buffer the output.

Usage is like:

with OutputBuffer() as bf:
    print('hello world')
assert bf.out == 'hello world\n'

Here's the implementation:

from io import StringIO
import sys


class OutputBuffer(object):

    def __init__(self):
        self.stdout = StringIO()
        self.stderr = StringIO()

    def __enter__(self):
        self.original_stdout, self.original_stderr = sys.stdout, sys.stderr
        sys.stdout, sys.stderr = self.stdout, self.stderr
        return self

    def __exit__(self, exception_type, exception, traceback):
        sys.stdout, sys.stderr = self.original_stdout, self.original_stderr

    @property
    def out(self):
        return self.stdout.getvalue()

    @property
    def err(self):
        return self.stderr.getvalue()
5

Both n611x007 and Noumenon already suggested using unittest.mock, but this answer adapts Acumenus's to show how you can easily wrap unittest.TestCase methods to interact with a mocked stdout.

import io
import unittest
import unittest.mock

msg = "Hello World!"


# function we will be testing
def foo():
    print(msg, end="")


# create a decorator which wraps a TestCase method and pass it a mocked
# stdout object
mock_stdout = unittest.mock.patch('sys.stdout', new_callable=io.StringIO)


class MyTests(unittest.TestCase):

    @mock_stdout
    def test_foo(self, stdout):
        # run the function whose output we want to test
        foo()
        # get its output from the mocked stdout
        actual = stdout.getvalue()
        expected = msg
        self.assertEqual(actual, expected)
2

Or consider using pytest, it has built-in support for asserting stdout and stderr. See docs

def test_myoutput(capsys): # or use "capfd" for fd-level
    print("hello")
    captured = capsys.readouterr()
    assert captured.out == "hello\n"
    print("next")
    captured = capsys.readouterr()
    assert captured.out == "next\n"
1
  • Good one. Can you include a minimal example since links can disappear and content can change?
    – KobeJohn
    Jun 10, 2016 at 2:20
1

Unittest ships with a context manager now (Python 3.7, but maybe earlier versions as well). You can just do this:

# example.py

import logging

def method_with_logging():
    logging.info("Hello, World!")

Then in your unit test:

# test.py

from unittest import TestCase
from example import method_with_logging

class TestExample(TestCase):
    def test_logging(self):
        with self.assertLogs() as captured:
            method_with_logging()
        self.assertEqual(len(captured.records), 1) # check that there is only one log message
        self.assertEqual(captured.records[0].getMessage(), "Hello, World!") # and it is the proper one

Taken from https://pythonin1minute.com/how-to-test-logging-in-python/

1
  • sweet, works like charm in 3.7
    – MolbOrg
    Oct 14, 2021 at 14:26
0

Building on all the awesome answers in this thread, this is how I solved it. I wanted to keep it as stock as possible. I augmented the unit test mechanism using setUp() to capture sys.stdout and sys.stderr, added new assert APIs to check the captured values against an expected value and then restore sys.stdout and sys.stderr upon tearDown(). I did this to keep a similar unit test API as the built-inunittestAPI while still being able to unit test values printed tosys.stdoutorsys.stderr`.

import io
import sys
import unittest


class TestStdout(unittest.TestCase):

    # before each test, capture the sys.stdout and sys.stderr
    def setUp(self):
        self.test_out = io.StringIO()
        self.test_err = io.StringIO()
        self.original_output = sys.stdout
        self.original_err = sys.stderr
        sys.stdout = self.test_out
        sys.stderr = self.test_err

    # restore sys.stdout and sys.stderr after each test
    def tearDown(self):
        sys.stdout = self.original_output
        sys.stderr = self.original_err

    # assert that sys.stdout would be equal to expected value
    def assertStdoutEquals(self, value):
        self.assertEqual(self.test_out.getvalue().strip(), value)

    # assert that sys.stdout would not be equal to expected value
    def assertStdoutNotEquals(self, value):
        self.assertNotEqual(self.test_out.getvalue().strip(), value)

    # assert that sys.stderr would be equal to expected value
    def assertStderrEquals(self, value):
        self.assertEqual(self.test_err.getvalue().strip(), value)

    # assert that sys.stderr would not be equal to expected value
    def assertStderrNotEquals(self, value):
        self.assertNotEqual(self.test_err.getvalue().strip(), value)

    # example of unit test that can capture the printed output
    def test_print_good(self):
        print("------")

        # use assertStdoutEquals(value) to test if your
        # printed value matches your expected `value`
        self.assertStdoutEquals("------")

    # fails the test, expected different from actual!
    def test_print_bad(self):
        print("@=@=")
        self.assertStdoutEquals("@-@-")


if __name__ == '__main__':
    unittest.main()

When the unit test is run, the output is:

$ python3 -m unittest -v tests/print_test.py
test_print_bad (tests.print_test.TestStdout) ... FAIL
test_print_good (tests.print_test.TestStdout) ... ok

======================================================================
FAIL: test_print_bad (tests.print_test.TestStdout)
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "/tests/print_test.py", line 51, in test_print_bad
    self.assertStdoutEquals("@-@-")
  File "/tests/print_test.py", line 24, in assertStdoutEquals
    self.assertEqual(self.test_out.getvalue().strip(), value)
AssertionError: '@=@=' != '@-@-'
- @=@=
+ @-@-


----------------------------------------------------------------------
Ran 2 tests in 0.001s

FAILED (failures=1)
0

I like sorens' straightforward [Answer][1] to the question and sample code, particularly since I'm not familiar with newer features like patch/mock. sorens didn't suggest a way to make the custom assertion methods of the example code's TestStdIO class reusable without resorting to cut/paste, so I took the approach of making TestStdIO a "mixin" class defined in its own module (teststdoutmethods.py in the following example). Since the usual unittest.TestCase-provided assert method references used in TestStdIO will also be available in the test case class, I removed the import unittest line from his sample code and also the derivation of TestStdIO from unittest.TestCase in the class declaration, i.e.,

import io
import sys

class TestStdIO(object):
    def setUp(self):
        ...

Otherwise the code of TestStdIO is as sorens' version sans the two example usages at the end. I used this mixin class version of TestStdIO in some simple unittest test cases of a class in one of the basic example text games in Ch. 2 of Kinsley and McGugan's Beginning Python Game Programming with PyGame, e.g.

import unittest
from teststdoutmethods import TestStdIO   # sorens' TestStdIO as a mixin.
from tank import Tank  # From Beginning Python Game Programming with PyGame.

class Test_Tank_fire(TestStdIO, unittest.TestCase):   # Note multiple inheritance.

    def test_Tank_fire_wAmmo(self):
        oTank1 = Tank('Bill', 5, 100)
        oTank2 = Tank('Jim', 5, 100)

        self.setUp()
        oTank1.fire_at(oTank2)

        self.assertStdoutEquals("Bill fires on Jim\nJim is hit!")
        self.assertEqual(str(oTank1), 'Bill (100 Armor, 4 Ammo)', 'fire_at shooter attribute results incorrect')
        self.assertTrue(str(oTank2) == 'Jim (80 Armor, 5 Ammo)', 'fire_at target attribute results incorrect')

        self.tearDown()

    def test_Tank_fire_woAmmo(self):
        oTank1 = Tank('Bill', 5, 100)
        oTank2 = Tank('Jim', 5, 100)

        # Use up 5 allotted shots.
        for n in range(5):
            oTank1.fire_at(oTank2)

        self.setUp()
        # Try one more.
        oTank1.fire_at(oTank2)

        self.assertStdoutEquals("Bill has no shells!")

        self.tearDown()
    
    def test_Tank_explode(self):
        oTank1 = Tank('Bill', 5, 100)
        oTank2 = Tank('Jim', 5, 100)

        # Use up 4 shots.
        for n in range(4):
            oTank1.fire_at(oTank2)

        self.setUp()
        # Fifth shot should finish the target.
        oTank1.fire_at(oTank2)

        self.assertStdoutEquals("Bill fires on Jim\nJim is hit!\nJim explodes!")
        self.tearDown()

        self.assertTrue(str(oTank2) == 'Jim (DEAD)', 'fire_at target __str__ incorrect when Dead')

The test cases (both successes and ginned failures) worked in Python 3.7. Note that sorens' technique captures all of the stdout output between the setup() and teardown() calls, so I placed these around the specific actions that would generate the specific output I wanted to check. I presume my mixin approach is what sorens would have intended for general reuse, but I'd like to know if anyone has a different recommendation. Thx. [1]: https://stackoverflow.com/a/62429695/7386731

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