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In the book by Andrew Koenig, Accelerated C++, he shows the following code:

vector<double> emptyvec()
{
    vector<double> v;    // no elements
    return v;
}

grade(midterm, final, emptyvec());

Now, grade function takes a const reference to vector<double>. This means to me that the temporary object returned by the emptyvec() should be copied because it is created in the stack as a local variable and aliasing that seems strange to me. How exactly this works? Also on another page, he passes a const reference to a function that takes its arguments by value and modifies them. Can a const reference of vector<double> be passed to a function whose parameter expects vector<double>?

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  • What makes you think a vector passed by reference should be copied? (And your second question should be a second question with appropriate code samples.) Commented Feb 13, 2017 at 10:01
  • Actually, I got a little confused. That vector is probably initialized in heap by vector constructor, right? By returning it by value and not by reference, after all emptyvec returns a vector not a reference, the value of v should be copied to parameter of grade, that's how I see it.
    – meguli
    Commented Feb 13, 2017 at 10:08
  • You said "grade function takes a const reference" but then in your last sentence you say "function whose parameter expects vector<double>"
    – M.M
    Commented Feb 13, 2017 at 10:17
  • The second question is about another function which expects a vector<double> and he passes a const vector<double>& to it.
    – meguli
    Commented Feb 13, 2017 at 10:20
  • @meguli A function defines the params it receives. This imposes constraints on what can be passed, but it's not one-to-one. It seems to me you're trying to learn what's allowed as a 'system of rules'. But it's more useful to understand what the code means. E.g. taking vector<double> means (apart from type) the object can be modified within the function, but those modifications must not affect the source. That second point is important, because the only way to guarantee the condition is to make a copy. Since you can copy something from its reference, this suits const & nicely. Commented Feb 13, 2017 at 12:06

2 Answers 2

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This means to me that the temporary object returned by the emptyvec() should be copied because it is created in the stack as a local variable

Absolutely, it does get copied. However, the place to which it gets copied is designated by the compiler, not by your program.

If it were not for compiler's ability to pass a temporary for a constant reference, you would be forced to do this:

vector<double> tmp(emptyvec());
grade(midterm, final, tmp);

That is pretty much what happens behind the scene in the code from the book, except there's no tmp variable accessible to the code.

Can a const reference of vector<double> be passed to a function whose parameter expects vector<double>?

Yes, as long as the parameter is passed by value, not by reference. Recall that a copy constructor takes a const reference. When you call a function that takes vector<double> and pass const vector<double>& to it, C++ invokes a constructor for vector<double>, passes it a constant reference, and uses the resultant copy inside the function.

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  • What if the function takes ` const vector<double>&` and I pass it a vector<double>? Do we still call the copy constructor?
    – meguli
    Commented Feb 14, 2017 at 11:01
  • 1
    @meguli If the function takes a const reference, there will be no copy constructor call during the invocation. Commented Feb 14, 2017 at 11:22
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Now, grade function takes a const reference to vector. This means to me that the temporary object returned by the emptyvec() should be copied

The fact that grade accepts a const reference does not influence whether the object returned by emptyvec is copied or not.

How exactly this works?

If you return a local variable by value, then you conceptually make a copy (or a move since C++11) of the local variable.

However, c++ standard allows copies (and moves) to be "elided". In practice, the optimizer can choose to construct the returned object in-place where it would have been copied to. This is called "(Named) Return Value Optimization".

Also on another page, he passes a const reference to a function that takes its arguments by value and modifies them. Can a const reference of vector be passed to a function whose parameter expects vector?

Initializing an object with a (const) reference of same type will invoke the the copy constructor. The argument of the function will be a copy of the object that was referred to.

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