2

The question is pretty simple. Given

struct Foo{
    bool     : 1;
    bool     : 1;
    int bar  : sizeof(int) * 8 - 2;
};

How can I set all bits of bar to 1, without a warning?

Obviously I can do auto v = Foo(); v.bar = ~0; but GCC gives me this:

warning: large integer implicitly truncated to unsigned type [-Woverflow]

I have tried a couple of ways, but it always renders a warning...

5
  • 1
    Why do you need a bit-field? (Btw, there is no guarantee your structure won't end up containing too bools and an int). – StoryTeller - Unslander Monica Feb 13 '17 at 10:46
  • M.b. u can use memset() ? – voltento Feb 13 '17 at 10:55
  • What do you get for v.bar = UINT_MAX; ? – M.M Feb 13 '17 at 11:19
  • Note: the warning indicates that the bitfield is unsigned; use signed int bar if you specifically want a signed field. – M.M Feb 13 '17 at 11:23
  • I'd use std::bitset instead of non-portable, problematic bit-fields. – Lundin Feb 13 '17 at 14:35
2

Don't use ~0 (which is always a full int), but ~v.bar, which is the right size and can be combined like so:

v.bar |= ~v.bar; // or,
v.bar ^= ~v.bar;

should do the trick, for any size.

Unfortunately you can't nicely wrap it in a function since you can't bind references to bitfields. You'd either need to make it a function on Foo&, or use a macro.

PS. I tried this quickly before posting with coliru, and just re-checked locally with GCC (g++) 5.3.1 and 6.2.0 - neither issue any diagnostic with -Wall.

PPS.

With this test code, GCC produces a diagnostic only for the unsigned member:

struct Foo {
  int i : 2;
  unsigned int u : 30;
};

void bar() {
  Foo f {0, 0};
  f.i ^= ~f.i; // OK
  f.u |= ~f.u; /* warning:
    large integer implicitly truncated to unsigned type [-Woverflow]
  */
}

So although I'd also usually prefer unsigned integers for bitfields or for bitwise manipulation, g++ is happier and quieter with int here.

7
  • g++ as of 6.0.1 still warns about these constructs (gcc doesn't). – n. 'pronouns' m. Feb 13 '17 at 11:05
  • clang 3.8 doesn't warn – olgierdh Feb 13 '17 at 11:21
  • Note: Foo v; v.bar |= ~v.bar; would be UB due to using uninitialized variable. This code relies on v.bar having previously been initialized, as it was in OP's code. And if you know it was zero-initialized then v.bar = ~v.bar; would suffice. – M.M Feb 13 '17 at 11:22
  • Also, if v.bar is narrower than int (as in this case), the integral promotions will promote it to int before applying the ~ operator – M.M Feb 13 '17 at 11:29
  • @n.m yeah I know - just a piece of information - there is no such thing as too much knowledge :) Maybe author will try to switch to clang ? – olgierdh Feb 13 '17 at 11:31
1

This works for me for unsigned types. Note that all bit-fiddling should be done with unsigned types, unless you're OK with undefined behaviour.

...
   unsigned int bar  : sizeof(int) * 8 - 2;
...

template <typename T, unsigned n>
constexpr T onebits()
{
    return 1 | (((1 << (n-2)) - 1) << 1);
}

v.bar = onebits<unsigned, sizeof(int) * 8 - 2>();
1
  • That is very neat as well, thank you for your contribution! – Jakob Riedle Feb 21 '17 at 11:04

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