1

Summary: On Postgres 9.3.15 the same query on my dev and production machines have very different query plans with the production machine being 300x slower!

I realize "Limit" and "Offset" aren't great in Postgresql, but this doesn't explain why it's fast on my dev and slow on my production.

Any suggestions? I've tried changing the cpu_tuple_cost(0.1 to 0.5 - no help)


My production server (Azure: 4 cpu, 16gig ram) takes 1100ms to run this query:

prod=# SELECT  "designs".* FROM "designs"  WHERE "designs"."user_id" IN (SELECT "users"."id" FROM "users"  WHERE (code_id=393))  ORDER BY updated_at desc, "designs"."updated_at" DESC LIMIT 20 OFFSET 0;
Time: 1175.486 ms

Meanwhile my dev server (Virtualbox, laptop, 2 gig ram) takes 4ms to run the same query, on the same database.

dev=# SELECT  "designs".* FROM "designs"  WHERE "designs"."user_id" IN (SELECT "users"."id" FROM "users"  WHERE (code_id=393))  ORDER BY updated_at desc, "designs"."updated_at" DESC LIMIT 20 OFFSET 0;
Time: 4.249 ms

The production query plan is this:

prod=# explain  SELECT  "designs".* FROM "designs"  WHERE "designs"."user_id" IN (SELECT "users"."id" FROM "users"  WHERE (code_id=393))  ORDER BY updated_at desc, "designs"."updated_at" DESC LIMIT 20 OFFSET 0;
                                                          QUERY PLAN
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Limit  (cost=169.00..113691.20 rows=20 width=966)
   ->  Nested Loop Semi Join  (cost=169.00..51045428.02 rows=8993 width=966)
         ->  Index Scan Backward using design_modification_date_idx on designs  (cost=85.00..1510927.32 rows=538151 width=966)
         ->  Index Scan using "User_UserUID_key" on users  (cost=84.00..92.05 rows=1 width=4)
               Index Cond: (id = designs.user_id)
               Filter: (code_id = 393)
(6 rows)

Time: 1.165 ms

The dev query plan is this:

dev=# explain SELECT  "designs".* FROM "designs"  WHERE "designs"."user_id" IN (SELECT "users"."id" FROM "users"  WHERE (code_id=393))  ORDER BY updated_at desc, "designs"."updated_at" DESC LIMIT 20 OFFSET 0;
                                                QUERY PLAN
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Limit  (cost=5686.78..5686.83 rows=20 width=964)
   ->  Sort  (cost=5686.78..5689.41 rows=1052 width=964)
         Sort Key: designs.updated_at
         ->  Nested Loop  (cost=0.71..5658.79 rows=1052 width=964)
               ->  Index Scan using code_idx on users  (cost=0.29..192.63 rows=67 width=4)
                     Index Cond: (code_id = 393)
               ->  Index Scan using "Design_idx_owneruid" on designs  (cost=0.42..73.58 rows=16 width=964)
                     Index Cond: (user_id = users.id)
(8 rows)

Time: 0.736 ms

Edit: OK after dumping a fresh copy of production data, i found the query planner to be the same (so it was a data issue - sorry!). The query is still slow though, any thoughts what could be done to improve it? I've tried adding indexes on designs(updated_at, user_id) and users(id, code_id) to no avail

Output of EXPLAIN (ANALYZE, BUFFERS):


 Limit  (cost=0.72..10390.79 rows=20 width=962) (actual time=1485.810..22025.828 rows=20 loops=1)
   Buffers: shared hit=883264 read=164340
   ->  Nested Loop Semi Join  (cost=0.72..4928529.42 rows=9487 width=962) (actual time=1485.809..22025.809 rows=20 loops=1)
         Buffers: shared hit=883264 read=164340
         ->  Index Scan Backward using design_modification_date_idx on designs  (cost=0.42..1442771.50 rows=538270 width=962) (actual time=1.737..18444.598 rows=263043 loops=1)
               Buffers: shared hit=108266 read=149409
         ->  Index Scan using "User_UserUID_key" on users  (cost=0.29..6.48 rows=1 width=4) (actual time=0.012..0.012 rows=0 loops=263043)
               Index Cond: (id = designs.user_id)
               Filter: (code_id = 393)
               Rows Removed by Filter: 1
               Buffers: shared hit=774998 read=14931
 Total runtime: 22027.477 ms
(12 rows)

EDIT: additional explain for suggested query

dev=# explain (analyze) SELECT designs.*
FROM designs
   JOIN (SELECT *
           FROM users
           WHERE code_id=393
           OFFSET 0
        ) users
      ON designs.user_id = users.id
ORDER BY updated_at desc
LIMIT 20;


 Limit  (cost=0.72..13326.65 rows=20 width=962) (actual time=2597.877..95734.152 rows=20 loops=1)
   ->  Nested Loop  (cost=0.72..6321154.70 rows=9487 width=962) (actual time=2597.877..95734.135 rows=20 loops=1)
         Join Filter: (designs.user_id = users.id)
         Rows Removed by Join Filter: 143621402
         ->  Index Scan Backward using design_modification_date_idx on designs  (cost=0.42..1410571.52 rows=538270 width=962) (actual time=0.024..5217.228 rows=263043 loops=1)
         ->  Materialize  (cost=0.29..1562.31 rows=608 width=4) (actual time=0.000..0.146 rows=546 loops=263043)
               ->  Subquery Scan on users  (cost=0.29..1559.27 rows=608 width=4) (actual time=0.021..1.516 rows=546 loops=1)
                     ->  Index Scan using code_idx on users users_1  (cost=0.29..1553.19 rows=608 width=602) (actual time=0.020..1.252 rows=546 loops=1)
                           Index Cond: (code_id = 393)
 Total runtime: 95734.353 ms
(10 rows)
2
  • 3
    Please post EXPLAIN (ANALYZE, BUFFERS) output. It looks like the databases contain different data. – Laurenz Albe Feb 13 '17 at 10:58
  • You were right - the dev data was only a few days out of date but putting a fresh copy of production onto dev resulted in the same slowness. I tried adding the index as per @chris-travers below but no luck. i've added the output of EXPLAIN (ANALYZE, BUFFERS) to the bottom of the main post. – Jon Soong Feb 15 '17 at 5:21
1

Here is how I read this. Again ANALYZE and BUFFERS may be helpful but here I don't think so.

In your dev db, it expects to find 67 users and therefore it selects these first, then sorts then does a limit and an offset. And for the amount of data looked at, this is fast.

On production it is assuming one user per id and going backwards, but a much larger number of designs per user, and therefore it searches designs along the ordering criteria first, and filters on user. This makes some sense when you realize it can stop after it finds 20 rows. But the data statistics make this into a bad plan and you get something which checks a bunch of extra records to find ones that are relevant.

So that's my guess as to what is happening. Make sure you understand why before you try to fix.....

Now, if you were to create a (user_id, code_id) index on the user table, you would likely get a significant speed up because you could avoid checking tuples during the index scan phase.

Another option might be to create an index of (modification_date, user_id) on the designs table. However this seems like a longer shot to me.

0

The problem is that the users with code_id = 393 are mostly related to designs with low updated_at, so that PostgreSQL hast to scan 263043 rows from designs before it has found 20 that satisfy the condition.

Since PostgreSQL does not have cross-table statistics, it does not know that its idea to avoid a sort by using the appropriate index leads to more than the few scanned rows it expects.

You could rewrite the query an use the old and ugly trick with OFFSET 0, which does not change the query semantics, but prevents PostgreSQL from considering the questionable optimization:

SELECT designs.*
FROM designs
   JOIN (SELECT *
           FROM users
           WHERE code_id=393
           OFFSET 0  /* avoid optimizations beyond using an index for code_id */
        ) u
      ON designs.user_id = users.id
ORDER BY updated_at desc
LIMIT 20;

That should give you the desired fast plan.

If that is not enough to push PostgreSQL towards choosing the good plan, you could further help it by dropping the design_modification_date_idx index, if that is an option.

5
  • Hi - thanks for the suggestion, i tried it but didn't get an improvement in performance :/ – Jon Soong Feb 17 '17 at 1:23
  • What is the plan that you get for this query? If it is something like the second plan in the question, that indicates that PostgreSQL did choose the correct plan. At any rate, if you want me to have a look at it, run EXPLAIN (ANALYZE) and add the result to your question. – Laurenz Albe Feb 17 '17 at 7:58
  • Are you quite sure that designs has an index on user_id? – Laurenz Albe Feb 20 '17 at 6:00
  • yup - definitely have that index – Jon Soong Feb 21 '17 at 11:13
  • Hmm - I have added another suggestion. If that doesn't help, I'm out of options. – Laurenz Albe Feb 23 '17 at 8:47

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.