My question is an extended version of this.

enter image description here

In my case the security group has to restrict the access to Load Balancer 1. It has to have some white listed IPs. So, which IPs can I put here that can allow access of Load Balancer 1 from Auto Scaling Group 2 private instances?

I have tried putting the Elastic IP of NAT Gateway as a whitelisted IP and it works. I want to understand why it is absolutely necessary to put this IP in Security Group to access the internet-facing ALB from the private subnet instance of the same VPC.

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I have tried putting the Elastic IP of NAT Gateway as a whitelisted IP and it works. I want to understand why it is absolutely necessary to put this IP in Security Group to access the internet-facing ALB from the private subnet instance of the same VPC.

Because the instances in the private subnet look up the DNS of the public load balancer, resolve it to its public internet IP, and then attempt to connect to that IP, which gets routed through the NAT gateway.

As far as I know there is no way to have a public Elastic Load Balancer that can also be resolved to a private IP inside your VPC. So you will have to go through the NAT gateway to access the public load balancer from inside your private IP.

An alternative setup would be to create a third load balancer, that is private, that also points to the instances in Auto-Scale Group #1, and have your private subnet instances communicate with that load balancer.

If you go with the third load balancer approach, you would create a new target group, assign that group as to your existing auto-scaling group, and point the new load balancer to the new target group. The key point is that a target group can only be used by one Application Load Balancer, but instances can belong to multiple target groups and auto-scaling groups can have multiple target groups.

  • Most interesting! I have confirmed that a situation where the security group on a "public" load balancer permits inbound traffic another security group ('SG2'), traffic from SG2 does not successfully reach the load balancer. I tested this by "cheating" -- I grabbed the private IP address of a Load Balancer node from the list of ENIs, and was able to communicate via that private IP address. The problem lies in the fact that the Load Balancer DNS name resolves to a public IP address rather than an internal one. The 3rd Load Balancer approach would work. – John Rotenstein Feb 14 '17 at 21:32

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.