9

I have the following test case which fails to retrieve the values from the Map:

package tests;

import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.Map;

public class ClassTest {

    interface A {}
    interface B extends A {}
    interface C extends A {}

    class D implements B {}
    class E implements C {}

    public ClassTest() {
        Map<Class<? extends A>, A> map = new HashMap<>();

        A d = new D();
        A e = new E();

        map.put(d.getClass(), d);
        map.put(e.getClass(), e);

        System.out.println(B.class.getSimpleName() + ": " + map.get(B.class));
        System.out.println(C.class.getSimpleName() + ": " + map.get(C.class));
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new ClassTest();
    }

}

The expected output was:

B: D
C: E

The actual output is:

B: null
C: null

From what I understand, the case is "expected" to fail because B.class will not be equal to D.class, even though D class is an implementation of the B interface... so the map.get(...) fails to find the instance value for the associated key. (Correct me if I'm wrong on this.) The case above hopefully shows the intention and "spirit" behind what I want to accomplish.

Is there a good/elegant alternative for this that works but also preserves the spirit of what I was trying to do?

I'm currently updating code to replace the enum-types that are being used as 'open sets' for Class<T> as type tokens, somewhat similar to Effective Java, 2nd Ed., Item 29.


As requested by @CKing in a comment, the part of the book that motivated my approach is quoted below.

The client presents a Class object when setting and getting favorites. Here is the API:

// Typesafe heterogeneous container pattern - API
public class Favorites {
    public <T> void putFavorite(Class<T> type, T instance);
    public <T> T getFavorite(Class<T> type);
}

Here is a sample program that exercises the Favorites class, storing, retrieving, and printing a favorite String, Integer, and Class instance:

// Typesafe heterogeneous container pattern - client
public static void main(String[] args) {
    Favorites f = new Favorites();

    f.putFavorite(String.class, "Java");
    f.putFavorite(Integer.class, 0xcafebabe);
    f.putFavorite(Class.class, Favorites.class);

    String favoriteString = f.getFavorite(String.class);
    int favoriteInteger = f.getFavorite(Integer.class);
    Class<?> favoriteClass = f.getFavorite(Class.class);
    System.out.printf("%s %x %s%n", favoriteString, favoriteInteger, favoriteClass.getName());
}

As you might expect, this program prints Java cafebabe Favorites.

Please understand that I know the book's example works because it's using the specific concrete class of the value (e.g. String.class for an actual String, and not some hypothetical derived type from String, etc.) As stated, this simply motivated my approach to see if my test case would work, and now I'm looking for a solution or alternative that respects the "spirit" of what I intended to do on the test case.

  • 1
    I am confused. map.get(B.class)) cannot return a unique map entry if you allow B.class to match B and all classes that derive from B. If there were a class F implements B and entries in the map for a D and an F, what would you expect map.get(B.class)) to return? – Matthew McPeak Feb 13 '17 at 15:29
  • @MatthewMcPeak I think that's a good point and I had not considered it because my hierarchy just like the simplistic version I showed above, just using different names... any suggestions/alternatives? – code_dredd Feb 13 '17 at 15:32
  • 1
    What is the map supposed to return for a map.get(A.class)? The D or E instance? – f1sh Feb 13 '17 at 15:42
  • 3
    I’m afraid it seems to me you are asking the impossible. You could climb up the type hierarchy and put some supertypes of the class of the inserted object into the map too; but to ensure that map.get(A.class) returns something welldefined and meaningful requres some data structure that goes beyond your simple map. – Ole V.V. Feb 13 '17 at 15:54
  • 1
    @ray I am not sure about CKing's comment (which may be why he deleted it). Class overrides neither equals nor hashCode, so it should inherit both from Object. If it overrode one and not the other, I would see the problem of using Class as a Map key. But as things are, I think it should work fine. Also, I posted an answer -- not sure if you saw it because I deleted then undeleted it. – Matthew McPeak Feb 13 '17 at 17:07
0

Maybe not so elegant, but you can use reflection to get all values assignable from Key.class:

System.out.println(B.class.getSimpleName() + ": " + getMapEntries(map, B.class));
System.out.println(C.class.getSimpleName() + ": " + getMapEntries(map, C.class));

....

private <T extends A> List<T> getMapEntries(Map<Class<? extends A>, A> map, Class<T> clazz) {
    List<T> result = new ArrayList<>();
    for (Map.Entry<Class<? extends A>, A> entry : map.entrySet()) {
        if (clazz.isAssignableFrom(entry.getKey())) {
            result.add((T) entry.getValue());
        }
    }
    return result;
}
  • 1
    Well, if iteration on our collection was an option then we wouldn't need a Map – CKing Feb 13 '17 at 16:02
0

If you want interface class keys to map to concrete instances, then you need to explicitly add those to your map.

package tests;

import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.Map;

public class ClassTest {

    interface A {}
    interface B extends A {}
    interface C extends A {}

    class D implements B {}
    class E implements C {}

    public ClassTest() {
        Map<Class<? extends A>, A> map = new HashMap<>();

        A d = new D();
        A e = new E();

        map.put(B.class,d);
        map.put(C.class,e);
        map.put(d.getClass(), d);
        map.put(e.getClass(), e);

        System.out.println(B.class.getSimpleName() + ": " + map.get(B.class));
        System.out.println(C.class.getSimpleName() + ": " + map.get(C.class));
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new ClassTest();
    }

}
  • Yes, aware that this particular approach would work, but I already mentioned in a comment above why I was avoiding this. – code_dredd Feb 13 '17 at 15:59
0

You can override your Map.put() so that whenever anyone puts an a D.class, it keys it under B.class. Like this:

package com.matt.tester;

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.Map;
import java.util.stream.Collectors;

public class Tester {

        interface A {}
        interface B extends A {}
        interface C extends A {}
        interface Q {};

        class D implements B, Q {}
        class E implements C, Q {}


        // New method to get the object's interface that derives from A.
        private Class<? extends A> getHierarchyClass(Class cls) {
            List<Class<?>> classList = Arrays.asList(cls.getInterfaces()).stream().filter(i -> A.class.isAssignableFrom(i)).collect(Collectors.toList());
            if ( classList.isEmpty() ) {
                return null;
            }
            return (Class<? extends A>) classList.get(0);

        }


        public Tester() {
            Map<Class<? extends A>, A> map = new HashMap<Class<? extends A>,A>() {
                @Override
                public A put(Class<? extends A> key, A value) {
                    // Whenever anyone puts a value in, actually put it in for whatever interface it implements that derives from A
                    Class<? extends A> newKey = getHierarchyClass(key);
                    if ( newKey != null ) {
                        return super.put(newKey, value);
                    }
                    return super.put(key, value);
                }
            };

            A d = new D();
            A e = new E();

            map.put(d.getClass(), d);
            map.put(e.getClass(), e);

            System.out.println(B.class.getSimpleName() + ": " + map.get(B.class));
            System.out.println(C.class.getSimpleName() + ": " + map.get(C.class));
        }



        public static void main(String[] args) {
            new Tester();
        }

}

Output:

B: com.matt.tester.Tester$D@404b9385
C: com.matt.tester.Tester$E@6d311334
  • The override would only work as long as users of the current code-base all make sure they use it, which at this point is an unrealistic expectation and would also break existing users outside the system, so I can't go with it. I think that, as per the comments, I'll need to go back to consider a different solution or keep using the enum types. – code_dredd Feb 14 '17 at 0:33
  • I'm a bit confused. All users of your code base have code to instantiates their own copy of this Map? – Matthew McPeak Feb 21 '17 at 17:02
0

For sure, the following is not an elegant solution but it works considering your "simplistic" type hierarchy.

What it does is populating an entry in the map for each class in the class hierarchy of the values' classes. Then, you can get values from the map using any interface or class that the values implement.

If several values implements the same class/interface, entries get overwritten but your design already has this kind of limitation.

public ClassTest()
{
    final Map<Class<? extends A>, A> map = new HashMap<>();

    final A d = new D();
    final A e = new E();

    getSuperClassesAndInterfaces(A.class, d.getClass()).forEach(clazz -> map.put(clazz, d));
    getSuperClassesAndInterfaces(A.class, e.getClass()).forEach(clazz -> map.put(clazz, e));

    System.out.println(B.class.getSimpleName() + ": " + map.get(B.class));
    System.out.println(C.class.getSimpleName() + ": " + map.get(C.class));
    System.out.println(B.class.getSimpleName() + ": " + map.get(D.class));
    System.out.println(C.class.getSimpleName() + ": " + map.get(E.class));
}

/**
 * Gets all the super classes and interfaces of first argument that are subclasses of the second argument.
 * 
 * @param <T> Type of the limit class.
 * @param aClass Any class.
 * @param limit We do not want anything higher in the hierarchy than this class.
 * @return A collection of classes and interfaces that 'aClass' implements and that are subclasses of 'limit'.
 */
// Did not find any elegant way to achieve this, but it works.
public <T> Collection<Class<? extends T>> getSuperClassesAndInterfaces(final Class<T> aClass, final Class<? extends A> limit)
{
    final Collection<Class<? extends T>> result = new HashSet<>();
    // Classes
    Class<?> rawClass = limit;
    while (rawClass != null && aClass.isAssignableFrom(rawClass))
    {
        result.add((Class<T>) rawClass);
        rawClass = rawClass.getSuperclass();
    }
    // Interfaces
    final Class<?>[] interfaces = limit.getInterfaces();
    for (final Class<?> itf : interfaces)
    {
        if (aClass.isAssignableFrom(itf))
        {
            result.add((Class<T>) itf);
        }
    }
    return result;
}

Output :

B: tests.ClassTest$D@41629346
C: tests.ClassTest$E@404b9385
B: tests.ClassTest$D@41629346
C: tests.ClassTest$E@404b9385

Frankly, this code is awful. Do you really need such a feature ?

  • "Do you really need such a feature?" No, it's just a refactoring effort and I was trying to see if there were valid ways to do what I had tried. I cannot assume that everyone else will keep the hierarchy like that. I think I'll have to go back to the drawing board on this one. – code_dredd Feb 14 '17 at 0:02

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