19

The question that I have is regarding converting the process of reading lines from a text file into an array instead of just reading it.

The error in my codes appear at string[] lines = File.ReadLines("c:\\file.txt"); with cannot implicity convert....

Can someone please advise on the codes to save the results in an array format? I've placed the ReadAllLines code which is able to save the results in an array too. Thanks!

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.IO;

namespace Testing
{
class Analysis
{
    static void Main()
    {
        string[] lines = File.ReadLines("c:\\file.txt");

        foreach (string r in lines)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("-- {0}", r);
        }

        // Keep the console window open in debug mode.
        Console.WriteLine("Press any key to exit.");
        System.Console.ReadKey();
    }
}
}

ReadAllLines Codes:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.IO;

namespace Testing
{
class ReadFromFile
{
    static void Main()
    {
        string[] lines = System.IO.File.ReadAllLines
        (@"C:\Users\Public\TestFolder\WriteLines2.txt");

        System.Console.WriteLine("Contents of writeLines2.txt =:");
        foreach (string line in lines)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("\t" + line);
        }

        // Keep the console window open in debug mode.
        Console.WriteLine("Press any key to exit.");
        System.Console.ReadKey();
    }
}
}
  • 4
    It looks like ReadAllLines already does what you want, so why are you trying to use ReadLines for this? – Gabe Nov 19 '10 at 0:18
  • Look at the comments below. Thanks. – JavaNoob Nov 19 '10 at 0:23
34

File.ReadLines() returns an object of type System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable<String>
File.ReadAllLines() returns an array of strings.

If you want to use an array of strings you need to call the correct function.

You could use Jim solution, just use ReadAllLines() or you could change your return type.

This would also work:

System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable<String> lines = File.ReadLines("c:\\file.txt");

You can use any generic collection which implements IEnumerable. IList for an example.

  • ReturnLines is not a defination. That's what the system is showing. – JavaNoob Nov 19 '10 at 0:33
  • Ah I see my typo now. I updated the answer it should be ReadLines. The point is if you need an array use ReadAllLines(). If you can use a collection ReadLines() works better on large files because individual lines are only pulled when needed. – Gerald Davis Nov 19 '10 at 15:06
  • 1
    Yup thats kinda of the idea to allow a larger file to be used in ReadLines. So the above codes is not similar to ReadAllLines right? – JavaNoob Nov 19 '10 at 17:04
  • Right. The actual read occurs when the specific line is needed. The exact mechanics are opaque I have noticed on some small files ReadLines actually reads all the lines at once. Likely in the implementation there is some optimization where instead of a single line read at once some "block" of lines is read into the collection. – Gerald Davis Nov 19 '10 at 17:51
  • Thanks for the answer! – JavaNoob Nov 22 '10 at 9:09
18
string[] lines = File.ReadLines("c:\\file.txt").ToArray();

Although one wonders why you'll want to do that when ReadAllLines works just fine.

Or perhaps you just want to enumerate with the return value of File.ReadLines:

var lines = File.ReadAllLines("c:\\file.txt");
foreach (var line in lines)
{
    Console.WriteLine("\t" + line);
}
  • The reason for using Readlines instead of ReadAllLines is due to the file size. It is advisable for large text files as it might cause an buffer to overflow. – JavaNoob Nov 19 '10 at 0:22
  • 4
    But calling ToArray will negate any benefit of calling ReadLines. Use the enumerator as I showed. – Jim Mischel Nov 19 '10 at 0:24
  • 4
    @Jim: I'm pretty sure that ReadLines does read the file line-by-line using a StreamReader or similar. That's the whole point. – LukeH Nov 19 '10 at 1:09
  • 1
    @LukeH: You're right. I stand corrected. The returned IEnumerable<string> is a one-use object. If, for example, you enumerate all the lines and then call Count(), you'll get an ObjectDisposedException. I understand why, but I can see that causing some confusion if someone were to pass that IEnumerator to a method that was expecting to query it multiple times. – Jim Mischel Nov 19 '10 at 16:21
  • 1
    @JavaNoob: I was wrong about how ReadLines is implemented. It does not read the entire file into memory. You can use ReadLines to avoid the buffer overflow problems that you mentioned. – Jim Mischel Nov 19 '10 at 16:23
1

Change string[] lines = File.ReadLines("c:\\file.txt"); to IEnumerable<string> lines = File.ReadLines("c:\\file.txt"); The rest of your code should work fine.

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