4

I have the following function for the unification of multiple collections (includes repeated elements):

public static <T> List<T> unify(Collection<T>... collections) {
        return Arrays.stream(collections)
               .flatMap(Collection::stream)
               .collect(Collectors.toList()); 
}

It would be nice to have a function with a similar signature for the intersection of collections (using type equality). For example:

public static <T> List<T> intersect(Collection<T>... collections) {
     //Here is where the magic happens
}

I found an implementation of the intersect function, but it doesnt use streams:

public static <T> Set<T> intersect(Collection<? extends Collection<T>> collections) {
    Set<T> common = new LinkedHashSet<T>();
    if (!collections.isEmpty()) {
       Iterator<? extends Collection<T>> iterator = collections.iterator();
       common.addAll(iterator.next());
       while (iterator.hasNext()) {
          common.retainAll(iterator.next());
       }
    }
    return common;
}

Is there any way to implement something similar to the unify function making use of streams? Im not so experienced in java8/stream api, because of that some advice would be really helpful.

  • 3
    And why do you think you need streams? – Joe C Feb 13 '17 at 22:17
  • Mere curiosity! I forgort to mention that Im really new to java 8/stream API, so Im currently trying to learn more by making use of the api :) – Jota.Toledo Feb 13 '17 at 22:21
  • Right. Personally, I feel that the best way to learn these APIs is to try to solve problems like this yourself. Give it a try, and if you get stuck, please come back with a specific question outlining your problem. – Joe C Feb 13 '17 at 22:25
  • 2
    The current implementation of Streams in Java is severely limited as a method can only return a single value so it is very cumbersome to work with multiple stream sources at once (as opposed to e.g. Haskell where it is trivial to work on multiple infinite lists). – Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Feb 13 '17 at 22:27
10

You can write your own collector in some utility class and use it:

public static <T, S extends Collection<T>> Collector<S, ?, Set<T>> intersecting() {
    class Acc {
        Set<T> result;

        void accept(S s) {
            if(result == null) result = new HashSet<>(s);
            else result.retainAll(s);
        }

        Acc combine(Acc other) {
            if(result == null) return other;
            if(other.result != null) result.retainAll(other.result);
            return this;
        }
    }
    return Collector.of(Acc::new, Acc::accept, Acc::combine, 
                        acc -> acc.result == null ? Collections.emptySet() : acc.result, 
                        Collector.Characteristics.UNORDERED);
}

The usage would be pretty simple:

Set<T> result = Arrays.stream(collections).collect(MyCollectors.intersecting());

Note however that collector cannot short-circuit: even if intermediate result will be an empty collection, it will still process the rest of the stream.

Such collector is readily available in my free StreamEx library (see MoreCollectors.intersecting()). It works with normal streams like above, but if you use it with StreamEx (which extends normal stream) it becomes short-circuiting: the processing may actually stop early.

  • It looks really interesting. I will take a closer look later. Your library looks really cool for what I saw! It offers some of the functionalitites that I miss from Linq in C#. Sadly for the project where I will use the intersect/unify function, Im only allowed to use java.util and some other basic libraries. – Jota.Toledo Feb 14 '17 at 9:22
  • 1
    @Jota.Toledo, then you may just copy the collector from the answer to some utility class and use it. – Tagir Valeev Feb 14 '17 at 11:31
3

While it’s tempting to think of retainAll as a black-box bulk operation that must be the most efficient way to implement an intersection operation, it just implies iterating over the entire collection and testing for each element whether it is contained in the collection passed as argument. The fact that you are calling it on a Set does not imply any advantage, as it is the other collection, whose contains method will determine the overall performance.

This implies that linearly scanning a set and testing each element for containment within all other collections will be on par with performing retainAll for each collection. Bonus points for iterating over the smallest collection in the first place:

public static <T> Set<T> intersect(Collection<? extends Collection<T>> collections) {
    if(collections.isEmpty()) return Collections.emptySet();
    Collection<T> smallest
        = Collections.min(collections, Comparator.comparingInt(Collection::size));
    return smallest.stream().distinct()
        .filter(t -> collections.stream().allMatch(c -> c==smallest || c.contains(t)))
        .collect(Collectors.toSet());
}

or, alternatively

public static <T> Set<T> intersect(Collection<? extends Collection<T>> collections) {
    if(collections.isEmpty()) return Collections.emptySet();
    Collection<T> smallest
        = Collections.min(collections, Comparator.comparingInt(Collection::size));
    HashSet<T> result=new HashSet<>(smallest);
    result.removeIf(t -> collections.stream().anyMatch(c -> c!=smallest&& !c.contains(t)));
    return result;
}
  • Its an interesting approach! I thought about finding the smallest collection as a starting point, but I didnt futher develope my idea. – Jota.Toledo Feb 14 '17 at 23:31
2

I think maybe it would make more sense to use Set instead of List (maybe that was a typo in your question):

public static <T> Set<T> intersect(Collection<T>... collections) {
     //Here is where the magic happens
     return (Set<T>) Arrays.stream(collections).reduce(
             (a,b) -> {
                 Set<T> c = new HashSet<>(a);
                 c.retainAll(b);
                 return c;
             }).orElseGet(HashSet::new);
}
  • 2
    Note that your solution may produce many garbage: an extra set is created per each input collection. This would significantly slow down the processing when we have many short collections. – Tagir Valeev Feb 14 '17 at 5:19
  • Thanks for your comment @Tagir. You are right that there are more efficient solutions possible such as your excellent StreamEx library. I will leave this answer here for educational purposes, because it is very short, it demonstrates the use of reduce well, and doesn't require any external libraries. – Patrick Parker Feb 14 '17 at 7:27
  • @TagirValeev I noticed that too. I wonder what would be the complexity of this approach. – Jota.Toledo Feb 14 '17 at 9:18
0

and here's a Set implementation. retainAll() is a Collection method, so it works on all of them.

public static <T> Set<T> intersect(Collection<T>... collections)
{
    return new HashSet<T>(Arrays.stream(collections).reduce(
            ((a, b) -> {
                a.retainAll(b);
                return a;
            })
    ).orElse(new HashSet<T>());
}

And with List<> if order is important.

public static <T> List<T> intersect2(Collection<T>... collections)
{
    return new ArrayList<T>(Arrays.stream(collections).reduce(
            ((a, b) -> {
                a.retainAll(b);
                return a;
            })
    ).orElse(new ArrayList<T>()));
}

Java Collections lets them look almost identical. If required, you could filter the List to be distinct as it may contain duplicates.

public static <T> List<T> intersect2(Collection<T>... collections)
{
    return new ArrayList<T>(Arrays.stream(collections).reduce(
            ((a, b) -> {
                a.retainAll(b);
                return a;
            })
    ).orElse(new ArrayList<T>())).stream().distinct());
}
  • I don't see what this adds to my answer, other than you are now mutating some of the input collections as a side-effect, which seems rather undesirable. – Patrick Parker Feb 14 '17 at 3:33
0

You can write it with streams as follows:

return collections.stream()
        .findFirst()        // find the first collection
        .map(HashSet::new)  // make a set out of it
        .map(first -> collections.stream()
                .skip(1)    // don't need to process the first one
                .collect(() -> first, Set::retainAll, Set::retainAll) 
        )
        .orElseGet(HashSet::new); // if the input collection was empty, return empty set

The 3-argument collect replicates your retainAll logic

The streams implementation gives you the flexibility to tweak the logic more easily. For example, if all your collections are sets, you might want to start with the smallest set instead of the first one (for performance). To do that, you would replace findFirst() with min(comparing(Collection::size)) and get rid of the skip(1). Or you could see if you get better performance with the type of data you work with by running the second stream in parallel and all you would need to do is change stream to parallelStream.

  • 2
    This assumes that the iteration order is reproducible, so that skip(1) will always skip the first encountered element of the first iteration. But this can’t be guaranteed, if the input is an unspecific Collection. Even, if the collection’s Iterator reports the elements in the same order each time, skip(1) is not required to respect that order, if the source didn’t reported an ORDERED characteristic (this can be shown with a HashSet and a parallel stream). – Holger Feb 14 '17 at 13:50

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