1

Its a little difficult to explain. It might be easier to skip to the examples.

A table has an id and four columns that each allow null.

ID, Col1, Col2, Col3, Col4

There are x number of rows. ( Usually less than 4 ) And only up to 4 distinct values will be used across the columns.

I am looking to return up to 4 rows, where each row in the resulting set is basically a column value where the value is selected left from right starting at the top preserving Col number. If another row has a value that is not column unique it is shifted to the next available column.

Examples:

If I have:

ID, Col1, Col2, Col3, Col4  
0,  A   , B   ,     , C  
1,      ,     , D   ,

I would like to return

A  
B  
D  
C

and

ID, Col1, Col2, Col3, Col4  
0,  A   , B   , D   ,   
1,  C   ,     ,     ,

Gives

A  
B  
D  
C 

and

ID, Col1, Col2, Col3, Col4  
0,  A   , B   , D   ,   
1,  C   ,     ,     ,  
2,  C   ,     ,     ,

Gives

A  
B  
D  
C 

Thanks! The scenario when there are non unique columns and spaces between values can be thrown out.
This will not happen:

a,b,,d
c,,,

This might help:

CREATE TABLE #original ( id int ,A INT, B INT, C INT, D INT );

INSERT INTO #original
--SELECT 0,1,2,null,4
--union 
--select 1,null,null,3,null
--
--
--SELECT 0,1,2,3,null
--union 
--select 1,4,null,null,null
--
--
SELECT 0,1,2,4,null
union 
select 1,3,null,null,null 
union 
select 2,3,null,null,null 

select * from #original order by id asc;

with cteOriginal as
(
    select *, RANK() over (partition by [SortOrder] order by id asc) as [NonUniqueSortOrder]
    from
    (
        select id, A as [value], 1 as [SortOrder]
        from #original
        where A is not null
        union all
        select id, B as [value], 2 as [SortOrder]
        from #original
        where B is not null
        union all
        select id, C as [value], 3 as [SortOrder]
        from #original
        where C is not null
        union all
        select id, D as [value], 4 as [SortOrder]
        from #original
        where D is not null
    ) as temp
)

select [value] from
(
select top 50 [value], ((([NonUniqueSortOrder] - 1) * 4) + [SortOrder]) sortedOrder
from cteOriginal
order by sortedOrder
) tmp
group by [value]
order by min(sortedOrder)

DROP TABLE #original
4
  • These potential Solutions did not work as the first example given will return A B D C
    – TrevDev
    Nov 19 '10 at 3:06
  • I shouldn't be ordering by the Column as I care more about what row / column it came from.
    – TrevDev
    Nov 19 '10 at 3:07
  • For what database - looks like you're dealing with SQL Server. Please include the version too.
    – OMG Ponies
    Nov 29 '10 at 21:43
  • Microsoft SQL Server 2005 - 9.00.4053.00 (X64) SP3
    – TrevDev
    Nov 29 '10 at 22:29
2

Use:

SELECT DISTINCT COL1 AS col
  FROM YOUR_TABLE
 WHERE col1 IS NOT NULL
UNION
SELECT DISTINCT COL2 AS col
  FROM YOUR_TABLE
 WHERE col2 IS NOT NULL
UNION 
SELECT DISTINCT COL3 AS col
  FROM YOUR_TABLE
 WHERE col3 IS NOT NULL
UNION
SELECT DISTINCT COL4 AS col
  FROM YOUR_TABLE
 WHERE col4 IS NOT NULL
ORDER BY col

UNION will remove duplicates between the statements; DISTINCT will return a unique list of values per statement. UNION ALL would be faster than UNION, but it doesn't remove duplicates.

2
  • If you check the updated examples you will see that this query does not work. Order By Col will sort by the value rather than the source of the value. I would somehow like the order to be the Source Column, except when a previous row already had a different value in that col. The examples show it better.
    – TrevDev
    Nov 29 '10 at 20:08
  • @Thx: I looked at the update, and I don't see anything remotely suggesting order based on the source rather than value. Both examples of expected output list "A, B, C, D" - which is what my query accomplishes.
    – OMG Ponies
    Nov 29 '10 at 20:15
1

I may not understand everything that you described you wanted. From reading your problem and comments from others, I am guessing that this is what you are looking for:

Updated version:

with cteOriginal as
(
    select *, RANK() over (partition by [SortOrder] order by id asc) as [NonUniqueSortOrder]
    from
    (
        select id, A as [value], 1 as [SortOrder]
        from #original
        where A is not null
        union all
        select id, B as [value], 2 as [SortOrder]
        from #original
        where B is not null
        union all
        select id, C as [value], 3 as [SortOrder]
        from #original
        where C is not null
        union all
        select id, D as [value], 4 as [SortOrder]
        from #original
        where D is not null
    ) as temp
)
select [value]
from cteOriginal
where id = (select MIN(tmp.id) from cteOriginal tmp where tmp.value = cteOriginal.value)
order by ((([NonUniqueSortOrder] - 1) * 4) + [SortOrder])

I got rid of the duplicate values by picking the one with the smallest id, min(id). You can change it to use max(id).

Initial version:

with cteOriginal as
(
    select *, RANK() over (partition by [column] order by id asc) as [NonUniqueSortOrder]
    from
    (
        select id, A as [value], 'A' as [Column], 1 as [SortOrder]
        from #original
        where A is not null
        union all
        select id, B as [value], 'B' as [Column], 2 as [SortOrder]
        from #original
        where B is not null
        union all
        select id, C as [value], 'C' as [Column], 3 as [SortOrder]
        from #original
        where C is not null
        union all
        select id, D as [value], 'D' as [Column], 4 as [SortOrder]
        from #original
        where D is not null
    ) as temp
)
select [value]
from cteOriginal
order by ((([NonUniqueSortOrder] - 1) * 4) + [SortOrder])

By the way, I am using mssql 2005 for this query. Please comment and we'll refine it.

10
  • I included a commented out select statement for inserting to test the second example. Can't format it well in comment. But the second example does not work. Try switching what select statements are commented.
    – TrevDev
    Nov 29 '10 at 23:17
  • What should the result be? It will help me tune the query. Nov 30 '10 at 4:35
  • I updated the query. Please check it out and see how it works out for you. Nov 30 '10 at 6:43
  • Thank You! I was starting to believe it may not be doable as a query. I had played with different sorting and pivoting for a while but wasn't able to have it work in both scenarios. I'll start looking up what partitioning is to better understand it.
    – TrevDev
    Nov 30 '10 at 18:40
  • Brilliant, I understand now. Thanks again.
    – TrevDev
    Nov 30 '10 at 18:49
0
select value from (    
    select col1 as value from table_name where col1 is not null
     union
    select col2 as value from table_name where col2 is not null
     union
    select col3 as value from table_name where col3 is not null
     union
    select col4 as value from table_name where col4 is not null     
) order by value
1
  • If you check the updated examples you will see that this query does not work. Order By value will sort by the value rather than the source of the value. I would somehow like the order to be the Source Column, except when a previous row already had a different value in that col. The examples show it better.
    – TrevDev
    Nov 29 '10 at 20:11
0

Try this one

With MyTables as
(
SELECT  [Col1] as [ColX] FROM [Test].[dbo].[MyTable] 
Union 
SELECT  [Col2] as [ColX]   FROM [Test].[dbo].[MyTable]
Union
SELECT  [Col3] as [ColX]   FROM [Test].[dbo].[MyTable]
Union
SELECT  [Col4] as [ColX]   FROM [Test].[dbo].[MyTable]
)
select ColX from MyTables where ColX is not null
1
  • Thanks, this is close but I may not have been specific enough that the results that are returned need to be in the correct order: For example one A B C D Where these four results kind of correspond to what Column they came from... or rather where they should have came from. With the largest ID having the highest priority. Thanks!
    – TrevDev
    Nov 19 '10 at 4:35

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