64

What I want to do is when I type some text in an input field, it should appear in another place realtime.

Below is my input;

<div className="post_input">
    <input className='post_data_input_overlay' placeholder="Ask your question here" ref="postTxt"/>
</div>

How can I achieve that?

4

12 Answers 12

115

Data binding in React can be achieved by using a controlled input. A controlled input is achieved by binding the value to a state variable and a onChange event to change the state as the input value changes.

See the below snippet

class App extends React.Component {
  constructor() {
    super();
    this.state = { value: 'Hello World' };
  }
  handleChange = (e) => {
    this.setState({ value: e.target.value });
  };
  render() {
    return (
      <div>
        <input
          type="text"
          value={this.state.value}
          onChange={this.handleChange}
        />
        <p>{this.state.value}</p>
      </div>
    );
  }
}

ReactDOM.render(<App />, document.getElementById('app'));
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/15.1.0/react.js"></script>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/15.1.0/react-dom.js"></script>
<div id="app"></div>


Update: React Hooks

Here is an equivalent function component of the class defined above.

const { useState } = React;

const App = () => {
  const [value, setValue] = useState('Hello World');
  const handleChange = (e) => setValue(e.target.value);
  return (
    <div>
      <input type="text" value={value} onChange={handleChange} />
      <p>{value}</p>
    </div>
  );
};

ReactDOM.render(<App />, document.getElementById('app'));
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/16.14.0/umd/react.production.min.js"></script>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react-dom/16.14.0/umd/react-dom.production.min.js"></script>
<div id="app"></div>

9
  • 8
    @vsync the handleChange method is written using an arrow function and arrow functions get the context from their parent which in this case is the react component class Jul 16 '18 at 14:41
  • 2
    This is not efficient, the arrow function is dynamic and when transpiled gets moved to the object constructor and not the prototype. So N instances of the component will generate N functions, instead of 1. Ideally you should bind in the constructor, although this is more verbose. Feb 19 '19 at 9:46
  • 1
    @jfeferman, yes you are right. Although this is more verbose and doesn't make much of a performance difference untill a huge amount of class instances are created Feb 19 '19 at 9:48
  • 2
    @Omu, yes you can do that, but its not very performant since it creates a new function on every render. binding in constructor is the preferred pattern May 13 '19 at 15:37
  • 1
    It is less boilerplate with React useState hook. See the example below in my answer
    – Andrew
    Jun 4 '19 at 1:44
24

To be short, in React, there's no two-way data-binding.

So when you want to implement that feature, try define a state, and write like this, listening events, update the state, and React renders for you:

class NameForm extends React.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props);
    this.state = {value: ''};

    this.handleChange = this.handleChange.bind(this);
  }

  handleChange(event) {
    this.setState({value: event.target.value});
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <input type="text" value={this.state.value} onChange={this.handleChange} />
    );
  }
}

Details here https://facebook.github.io/react/docs/forms.html

UPDATE 2020

Note:

LinkedStateMixin is deprecated as of React v15. The recommendation is to explicitly set the value and change handler, instead of using LinkedStateMixin.

above update from React official site . Use below code if you are running under v15 of React else don't.

There are actually people wanting to write with two-way binding, but React does not work in that way. If you do want to write like that, you have to use an addon for React, like this:

var WithLink = React.createClass({
  mixins: [LinkedStateMixin],
  getInitialState: function() {
    return {message: 'Hello!'};
  },
  render: function() {
    return <input type="text" valueLink={this.linkState('message')} />;
  }
});

Details here https://facebook.github.io/react/docs/two-way-binding-helpers.html

For refs, it's just a solution that allow developers to reach the DOM in methods of a component, see here https://facebook.github.io/react/docs/refs-and-the-dom.html

8
  • 1
    @CraZyDroiD say your text field is <span>, just use <span>{this.state.value}</span>. React renders it based on this.state, and inside {} it's a JavaScript expression. Feb 14 '17 at 4:20
  • 2
    Downvoted. Your first sentence comes across as condescending and distracts from what's important - the answer.
    – Yoshiyahu
    Dec 21 '17 at 1:20
  • 1
    @ncubica @ Yoshiyahu You can edit the answer as you want. I'm already give up answering questions since SO is such an unfriendly community. Disappointed. Dec 25 '17 at 8:19
  • 2
    @jiyinyiyong no worries. I hope you don't stop answering questions. People don't mean to seem rude, but I think we can all get better at making sure our answers, questions and comments are worded thoughtfully. Jan 23 '18 at 8:47
  • 1
    @AkhilV this is too old. LinkedStateMixin has been deprecated for long. Sep 2 '20 at 10:22
12

With introduction of React hooks the state management (including forms state) became very simple and, in my opinion, way more understandable and predictable comparing with magic of other frameworks. For example:

const MyComponent = () => {
    const [value, setValue] = React.useState('some initial value');
    return <input value={value} onChange={e => setValue(e.target.value)} />;
}

This one-way flow makes it trivial to understand how the data is updated and when rendering happens. Simple but powerful to do any complex stuff in predictable and clear way. In this case, do "two-way" form state binding.

The example uses the primitive string value. Complex state management, eg. objects, arrays, nested data, can be managed this way too, but it is easier with help of libraries, like Hookstate (Disclaimer: I am the author of this library). Here is the example of complex state management.

When a form grows, there is an issue with rendering performance: form state is changed (so rerendering is needed) on every keystroke on any form field. This issue is also addressed by Hookstate. Here is the example of the form with 5000 fields: the state is updated on every keystore and there is no performance lag at all.

6

To bind a control to your state you need to call a function on the component that updates the state from the control's event handler.

Rather than have an update function for all your form fields, you could create a generic update function using ES6 computed name feature and pass it the values it needs inline from the control like this:

class LovelyForm extends React.Component {
  constructor(props) {
  alert("Construct");
    super(props);
    this.state = {
      field1: "Default 1",
      field2: "Default 2"
    };
  }

  update = (name, e) => {
    this.setState({ [name]: e.target.value });
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <form>
        <p><input type="text" value={this.state.field1} onChange={(e) => this.update("field1", e)} />
          {this.state.field1}</p>
        <p><input type="text" value={this.state.field2} onChange={(e) => this.update("field2", e)} />
          {this.state.field2}</p>
      </form>
    );
  }
}
ReactDOM.render(<LovelyForm/>, document.getElementById('example'));
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/15.1.0/react.min.js"></script>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/15.1.0/react-dom.min.js"></script>
<div id="example"></div>

1
  • How do you set the state with typescript
    – kozla13
    Jan 13 at 15:18
3

This could be achieved with a hook. However, I would not recommend it, as it strictly couples state and layout.

November 2019 Data Bind with Hooks

const useInput = (placeholder, initial) => {
    const [value, setVal] = useState(initial)
    const onChange = (e) => setVal(e.target.value)
    const element = <input value={value} onChange={onChange} placeholder={placeholder}/>
    return {element, value}
}

Use it in any functional component

const BensPlayGround = () => {
    const name = useInput("Enter name here")
    return (
        <>
            {name.element}
            <h1>Hello {name.value}</h1>
        </>
    )
}

Basic version - bind value and onChange

const useDataBind = () => {
    const [value, setVal] = useState("")
    const onChange = (e) => setVal(e.target.value)
    return {value, onChange}
}

const Demo = (props) => {
    const nameProps = useDataBind()
    return (
        <>
            <input {...nameProps} placeholder="Enter name here" />
            <h1>Hello {nameProps.value}</h1>
        </>
    )
}
1

class App extends React.Component {
  constructor() {
    super();
    this.state = {value : ''}
  }
  handleChange = (e) =>{ 
    this.setState({value: e.target.value});
  }
  render() {
    return (
    <div>
        <input type="text" value={this.state.value} onChange={this.handleChange}/>
        <div>{this.state.value}</div>
    </div>
   )
  }
}
ReactDOM.render(<App/>, document.getElementById('app'));
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/15.1.0/react.js"></script>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/15.1.0/react-dom.js"></script>
<div id="app"></div>

1

There are actually people wanting to write with two-way binding, but React does not work in that way.

That's true, there are people who want to write with two-way data binding. And there's nothing fundamentally wrong with React preventing them from doing so. I wouldn't recommend them to use deprecated React mixin for that, though. Because it looks so much better with some third-party packages.

import { LinkedComponent } from 'valuelink'

class Test extends LinkedComponent {
    state = { a : "Hi there! I'm databinding demo!" };

    render(){
        // Bind all state members...
        const { a } = this.linkAll();

        // Then, go ahead. As easy as that.
        return (
             <input type="text" ...a.props />
        )
    }
}

The thing is that the two-way data binding is the design pattern in React. Here's my article with a 5-minute explanation on how it works

1

With the new feature called Hooks from the React team which makes functional components to handle state changes.. your question can be solved easily

import React, { useState, useEffect } from 'react'
import ReactDOM from 'react-dom';

const Demo = props =>{
    const [text, setText] = useState("there");
    return props.logic(text, setText);
};

const App = () => {
    const [text, setText] = useState("hello");

    const componentDidMount = () =>{
        setText("hey");
    };
    useEffect(componentDidMount, []);

    const logic = (word, setWord) => (
        <div>
            <h1>{word}</h1>
            <input type="text" value={word} onChange={e => setWord(e.target.value)}></input>
            <h1>{text}</h1>
            <input type="text" value={text} onChange={e => setText(e.target.value)}></input>
        </div>
    );
    return <Demo logic={logic} />;
};

ReactDOM.render(<App />,document.getElementById("root"));
0

Some modules makes simpler data-binding in forms, for example:

react-distributed-forms

class SomeComponent extends React.Component {
  state = {
    first_name: "George"
  };

  render() {
    return (
      <Form binding={this}>
        <Input name="first_name" />
      </Form>
    );
  }
}

https://www.npmjs.com/package/react-distributed-forms#data-binding

It uses React context, so you don't have to wire together input in forms

Here's a live demo

0

Don't need to Break head with setState() in react.js

A new library made by me React-chopper

Code Like angularjs in reactjs

Code without setState in reactjs

Go through examples for more description

import React, { Component } from 'react';
import { render } from 'react-dom';
import Rcp from 'react-chopper';

class App extends Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props);
    this.state = {
      name: 'React'
    };
    this.modal = Rcp(this.state, this);
  }

  tank = () => {
    console.log(this.modal)
  }
  render() {
    return (
      <div>
        <input value={this.modal.name} onChange={e => this.modal.name = e.target.value} />
        <p> Bang Bang {this.modal.name} </p>
        <button onClick={() => this.tank()}>console</button>
      </div>
    );
  }
}

render(<App />, document.getElementById('root'));

Comments , Pr Are welcome ...Enjoy

0

Define state attributes. Add universal handleChange event handler. Add name param to input tag for mapping.

this.state = { stateAttrName:"" }

handleChange=(event)=>{
    this.setState({[event.target.name]:event.target.value });
  } 

<input className="form-control" name="stateAttrName" value= 
{this.state.stateAttrName} onChange={this.handleChange}/>
0

I think @Richard Garside is correct.

I suggest some changes to clear even more the code.

Change this

onChange={(e) => this.update("field2", e)}

To this

onChange={this.handleOnChange}

And also, change this

this.setState({ [name]: e.target.value });

To this

this.setState({ [e.target.name]: e.target.value})

Besides, you have to add the "name" attribute to the field with a value that relates with the key on the state object.

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