22

I have a list of files that get generated during the CMake build process. I want to compile these files using "add_library" afterward, but I won't know which files get generated until after they get generated. Is there anyway to build this into a CMake script?

13

Well, I think it is possible, so I'll share what I've done. My problem was that I had to compile several CORBA idls to use as part of a project's source and I didn't want to manually list every file. I thought it would be better to find the files. So I did it like this:

file(GLOB IDLS "idls/*.idl")
set(ACE_ROOT ${CMAKE_FIND_ROOT_PATH}/ace/ACE-${ACE_VERSION})
foreach(GENERATE_IDL ${IDLS})
   get_filename_component(IDLNAME ${GENERATE_IDL} NAME_WE)
   set(OUT_NAME ${CMAKE_CURRENT_SOURCE_DIR}/idls_out/${IDLNAME})

   list(APPEND IDL_COMPILED_FILES ${OUT_NAME}C.h ${OUT_NAME}C.cpp ${OUT_NAME}S.h ${OUT_NAME}S.cpp)

   add_custom_command(OUTPUT ${OUT_NAME}C.h ${OUT_NAME}C.cpp ${OUT_NAME}S.h ${OUT_NAME}S.cpp
                      COMMAND ${ACE_ROOT}/bin/tao_idl -g ${ACE_ROOT}/bin/ace_gperf -Sci -Ssi -Wb,export_macro=TAO_Export -Wb,export_include=${ACE_ROOT}/include/tao/TAO_Export.h -Wb,pre_include=${ACE_ROOT}/include/ace/pre.h -Wb,post_include=${ACE_ROOT}/include/ace/post.h -I${ACE_ROOT}/include/tao -I${CMAKE_CURRENT_SOURCE_DIR} ${GENERATE_IDL} -o ${CMAKE_CURRENT_SOURCE_DIR}/idls_out/
                      COMMENT "Compiling ${GENERATE_IDL}")
endforeach(GENERATE_IDL)

set_source_files_properties(${IDL_COMPILED_FILES}
                            PROPERTIES GENERATED TRUE)

set(TARGET_NAME ${PROJECT_NAME}${DEBUG_SUFFIX})

add_executable(
   ${TARGET_NAME}
   ${SOURCE} 
   ${IDL_COMPILED_FILES}
)

The GENERATED properties is useful in case one of my idl compilation outputs (*C.cpp, *C.h, *S.cpp and *S.h) is not created, so that the build command doesn't complain that the file doesn't exist.

12

Well, it is possible to do so with CMake's CMAKE_CONFIGURE_DEPENDS directory property. This forces CMake to reconfigure if any of the given files changed.

Simple solution

The following code shows the approach for a single model file, that is used as input for the code generation:

set(MODEL_FILE your_model_file)
set_directory_properties(PROPERTIES CMAKE_CONFIGURE_DEPENDS ${MODEL_FILE})
set(GENERATED_SOURCE_DIR ${CMAKE_CURRENT_BINARY_DIR}/${MODEL_FILE})

file(REMOVE_RECURSE ${GENERATED_SOURCE_DIR})
file(MAKE_DIRECTORY ${GENERATED_SOURCE_DIR})
execute_process(COMMAND your_code_generation_tool -o ${GENERATED_SOURCE_DIR} ${MODEL_FILE})

file(GLOB LIBGENERATED_FILES ${GENERATED_SOURCE_DIR}/*)
add_library(libgenerated ${LIBGENERATED_FILES})
target_include_directories(libgenerated ${GENERATED_SOURCE_DIR})

With the above approach, each time the model file has changed CMake will reconfigure which results in the model being regenerated.

Advanced solution

The problem with the simple solution is that even for the smallest possible change in the model the entire dependencies of the generated files have to be rebuilt.

The advanced approach uses CMake's copy_if_different feature to let only generated files that are affected by the model change to appear modified which results in better build times. To achieve that we use a staging directory as destination for the generator and sync the contents subsequently with the generator output of the previous compile run:

set(MODEL_FILE your_model_file)
set(GENERATOR_STAGING_DIR ${CMAKE_CURRENT_BINARY_DIR}/${MODEL_FILE}.staging)
set(GENERATOR_OUTPUT_DIR ${CMAKE_CURRENT_BINARY_DIR}/${MODEL_FILE})

set_directory_properties(PROPERTIES CMAKE_CONFIGURE_DEPENDS ${MODEL_FILE})

# Create fresh staging/final output directory
file(REMOVE_RECURSE ${GENERATOR_STAGING_DIR})
file(MAKE_DIRECTORY ${GENERATOR_STAGING_DIR})
file(MAKE_DIRECTORY ${GENERATOR_OUTPUT_DIR})

# Run code generation
execute_process(COMMAND your_code_generation_tool -o ${GENERATOR_STAGING_DIR} "${CMAKE_CURRENT_SOURCE_DIR}/${MODEL_FILE}")

# Remove stale files from final generator output directory
file(GLOB GENERATED_FILES RELATIVE "${GENERATOR_OUTPUT_DIR}/" "${GENERATOR_OUTPUT_DIR}/*")
foreach(FILE ${GENERATED_FILES})
    if(NOT EXISTS "${GENERATOR_STAGING_DIR}/${FILE}")
        file(REMOVE "${GENERATOR_OUTPUT_DIR}/${FILE}")
    endif()    
endforeach()

# Copy modified files from staging to final generator output directory
file(GLOB GENERATED_FILES RELATIVE "${GENERATOR_STAGING_DIR}/" "${GENERATOR_STAGING_DIR}/*")
foreach(FILE ${GENERATED_FILES})
    execute_process(COMMAND ${CMAKE_COMMAND} -E copy_if_different "${GENERATOR_STAGING_DIR}/${FILE}" "${GENERATOR_OUTPUT_DIR}")
endforeach()

file(GLOB LIBGENERATED_FILES "${GENERATOR_OUTPUT_DIR}/*")
add_library(libgenerated ${LIBGENERATED_FILES})
target_include_directories(libgenerated PUBLIC ${GENERATOR_OUTPUT_DIR})
1
  • Compiling only if files have changed is a nice feature to have. Recently I've been thinking about improving my code with this to speed up my compilation time. Maybe I'll try this approach or adapt it to mine if possible. – Salsa Dec 13 '17 at 14:46
2

If you don't know the name of the files that will be generated, you can "glob" the folders where they reside.

file( GLOB_RECURSE MY_SRC dest_folder/*.cpp )
add_library( libname SHARED ${MY_SRC} )

Now I'm not sure what triggers the generation of these files. The "globbing" will happen only when you manually run cmake: it will not be able to detect automatically that new files are present.

2
  • 3
    The files are generated during 'make'. So using GLOB_RECURSE or any globbing within cmake won't work. – Jonathan Sternberg Nov 24 '10 at 5:24
  • Then maybe you need to split your build process in two. The first cmake project will end with the generation of these files. The second will glob the folder with the new files and build them. One way you can implement that nicely is using hudson (hudson.dev.java.net). You can create the dependency between the two projects and trigger the build of one after the other. – Mathieu JVL Nov 29 '10 at 17:52
1

Treat this as a non-answer, just more info:

I recently had to do something for one case where I had a .cpp file that was auto-generated, but I could not figure out how to get CMake to construct the Visual Studio project file that would then compile it. I had to resort to something quite stinky: I had to #include <the_generated.cpp> file from another file that resided under the ${CMAKE_CURRENT_SOURCE} directory. That won't help you much in your case because I suspect you have several .cpp files, so this approach is not scalable.

Also, I found that the GENERATED source file property, when added to the file, did not help at all.

I consider this condition either a bug in Visual Studio (in my case this was VS2008 SP1), or in how CMake generates the .vcproj files, or both.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.