19

I have a HTML table as follows:

<table border="1">
    <tr>
        <td>Row with text</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td></td><!-- Empty row -->
    </tr>
</table>

When you run this you'll see the second row is collapsed, but I'd rather it was rendered uncollapsed, with the same height as the first row. One way of doing this is to put a &nbsp; entity, as follows:

<table border="1">
    <tr>
        <td>Row with text</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>&nbsp;</td><!-- Empty row -->
    </tr>
</table>

Is there a way I can achieve the second result, via CSS, using the HTML from the first snippet?

  • Just give a min-height to td via css. – Aslam Feb 14 '17 at 11:41
22

You can use this code:

td:empty:after{
  content: "\00a0";
}

It adds escaped &nbsp; after every originally empty td, solving your issue.

td:empty:after{
  content: "\00a0";
}
<table border="1">
    <tr>
        <td>Row with text</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td></td><!-- Empty row -->
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>asd</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>dees</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td></td><!-- Empty row -->
    </tr>
</table>

Learn more about escaping HTML entities here.

3

You can add height to table-cell, in this case it'll work like min-height property for other elements (with display: block, display: inline-block, etc). I added another table row with long text to demonstrate it:

td {
    height: 22px;
}
<table border="1">
    <tr>
        <td>Row with text</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td></td><!-- Empty row -->
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>Very-very long text with many words, Very-very long text with many words, Very-very long text with many words, Very-very long text with many words, Very-very long text with many words</td>
    </tr>
</table>

You can't use min-height property, because the specification says:

In CSS 2.1, the effect of 'min-height' and 'max-height' on tables, inline tables, table cells, table rows, and row groups is undefined.

  • This solution works, but it's not as good as wscourge's solution because, depending on what you set the height to, blank rows may not be exactly the same height as non-blank rows. With wscourge's solution blank and non-blank rows are the same height. – Dan Stevens Feb 14 '17 at 17:05
  • @DanStevens yes, I agree, his solution is better =). – Sergey Denisov Feb 14 '17 at 17:13

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