22

Consider the following Pytest:

import pytest

class TimeLine(object):
    instances = [0, 1, 2]

@pytest.fixture
def timeline():
    return TimeLine()

def test_timeline(timeline):
    for instance in timeline.instances:
        assert instance % 2 == 0

if __name__ == "__main__":
    pytest.main([__file__])

The test test_timeline uses a Pytest fixture, timeline, which itself has the attribute instances. This attribute is iterated over in the test, so that the test only passes if the assertion holds for every instance in timeline.instances.

What I actually would like to do, however, is to generate 3 tests, 2 of which should pass and 1 of which would fail. I've tried

@pytest.mark.parametrize("instance", timeline.instances)
def test_timeline(timeline):
    assert instance % 2 == 0

but this leads to

AttributeError: 'function' object has no attribute 'instances'

As I understand it, in Pytest fixtures the function 'becomes' its return value, but this seems to not have happened yet at the time the test is parametrized. How can I set up the test in the desired fashion?

24

This is actually possible via indirect parametrization.

This example does what you want with pytest 3.1.2:

import pytest

class TimeLine:
    def __init__(self, instances):
        self.instances = instances

@pytest.fixture
def timeline(request):
    return TimeLine(request.param)

@pytest.mark.parametrize(
    'timeline',
    ([1, 2, 3], [2, 4, 6], [6, 8, 10]),
    indirect=True
)
def test_timeline(timeline):
    for instance in timeline.instances:
        assert instance % 2 == 0

if __name__ == "__main__":
    pytest.main([__file__])

Also see this similar question.

7

instead of indirect parametrization, or my hacky solution below involving inheritance, you can also just use the params argument to @pytest.fixture() -- i think this is the simplest solution maybe?

import pytest

class TimeLine:
    def __init__(self, instances=[0, 0, 0]):
        self.instances = instances


@pytest.fixture(params=[
    [1, 2, 3], [2, 4, 5], [6, 8, 10]
])
def timeline(request):
    return TimeLine(request.param)


def test_timeline(timeline):
    for instance in timeline.instances:
        assert instance % 2 == 0

https://docs.pytest.org/en/latest/fixture.html#parametrizing-fixtures

3

From https://bitbucket.org/pytest-dev/pytest/issues/349/using-fixtures-in-pytestmarkparametrize, it would appear that it is currently not possible to use fixtures in pytest.mark.parametrize.

3

The use of indirect parametrization works, but I find the need to use request.param as a magic, unnamed variable a little awkard.

Here's a pattern I've used. It's awkward in a different way, arguably, but perhaps you'll prefer it too!

import pytest

class TimeLine:
    def __init__(self, instances):
        self.instances = instances


@pytest.fixture
def instances():
    return [0, 0, 0]


@pytest.fixture
def timeline(instances):
    return TimeLine(instances)


@pytest.mark.parametrize('instances', [
    [1, 2, 3], [2, 4, 5], [6, 8, 10]
])
def test_timeline(timeline):
    for instance in timeline.instances:
        assert instance % 2 == 0

the timeline fixture depends on another fixture called instances, which has a default vale of [0,0,0], but in the actual test, we use parametrize to inject a series of different values for instances.

the advantage as I see it is that everything has a good name, plus you don't need to pass that indirect=True flag.

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