33

I'm interested in creating a loading spinner entirely in CSS but in order to do so I would need to be able to draw a open ring shape like this:

enter image description here

The ring would draw itself around the circumference of the circle. Is this achievable in CSS?

4
  • 1
    You can style SVG circle with stroke-dasharray. It is animable and can be used both in CSS and as an attribute: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/SVG/Attribute/…
    – jaboja
    Feb 14, 2017 at 19:49
  • @JakubJagiełło Would this allow me to draw the border along the circumference of the circle?
    – colindunn
    Feb 14, 2017 at 19:57
  • The trick is that you essentially style the border around the circumference to be dashed line with only one dash and by animating this dash length you may create effect of line growing around.
    – jaboja
    Feb 14, 2017 at 20:00
  • @colindunn I've updated my answer to work somewhat similarly, using SVG and stroke-dasharray. This is likely the only way to "draw" the outline of the circle using only HTML and CSS. Feb 14, 2017 at 20:12

4 Answers 4

56

To create a circle that gradually draws it's outer path, use SVG.

SVG's stroke-dasharray property will turn any path into a dashed line, which you can use to your advantage by setting the dash size to be almost as long as the path itself.

Then use a CSS animation to gradually change the stroke-dashoffset to move the dash around the perimeter of your circle.

circle {
  fill: white;
  stroke: black;
  stroke-width: 2;
  stroke-dasharray: 250;
  stroke-dashoffset: 1000;
  animation: rotate 5s linear infinite;
}

@keyframes rotate {
  to {
    stroke-dashoffset: 0;
  }
}
<svg height="100" width="100">
  <circle cx="50" cy="50" r="40" />
</svg>

21

Static Image

A simplified example that just relies on a single HTML element and CSS class might look like this :

.arc {
  /* Border size and color */
  border: 2px solid #000;
  /* Creates a circle */
  border-radius: 50%;
  /* Circle size */
  height: 100px;
  width: 100px;
  /* Use transparent borders to define opening (more transparent = larger opening) */
  border-top-color: transparent;
  border-left-color: transparent;
  /* Use transform to rotate to adjust where opening appears */
  transform: rotate(300deg)
}

Example

enter image description here

.arc {
  border: 2px solid #000;
  border-radius: 50%;
  height: 100px;
  width: 100px;
  border-top-color: transparent;
  transform: rotate(300deg)
}
<div class='arc'></div>

Rotating Image

You can apply a basic rotation to the previous static example by taking advantage of CSS-based animations using @keyframes :

.arc {
  /* Border size and color */
  border: 2px solid #000;
  /* Creates a circle */
  border-radius: 50%;
  /* Circle size */
  height: 100px;
  width: 100px;
  /* Use transparent borders to define opening (more transparent = larger opening) */
  border-top-color: transparent;
  /* Rotate indefinitely (longer time = slower rotation) */
  animation: rotate 2s infinite linear;
}

@keyframes rotate {
  0%    { transform: rotate(0deg);  }
  100%  { transform: rotate(360deg);  }
}

Example

enter image description here

.arc {
  border: 2px solid #000;
  border-radius: 50%;
  height: 100px;
  width: 100px;
  border-top-color: transparent;
  animation: rotate 2s infinite linear;
}

@keyframes rotate {
  0%    { transform: rotate(0deg);  }
  100%  { transform: rotate(360deg);  }
}
<div class='arc'></div>

Drawing (without SVG)

Another approach that I came across, while not nearly as elegant as the previous approaches does appear to achieve your desired effect. In involves the use of several animations as well as showing/hiding different sections of the circle as necessary.

The code snippet contains an example demonstrating it.

Example

enter image description here

#container {
  position: absolute;
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  animation: colors 1s infinite;
}
#halfclip {
  width: 50%;
  height: 100%;
  right: 0px;
  position: absolute;
  overflow: hidden;
  transform-origin: left center;
  animation: cliprotate 4s steps(2) infinite;
  -webkit-animation: cliprotate 4s steps(2) infinite;
}
.halfcircle {
  box-sizing: border-box;
  height: 100%;
  right: 0px;
  position: absolute;
  border: solid 2px transparent;
  border-top-color: #000;
  border-left-color: #000;
  border-radius: 50%;
}
#clipped {
  width: 200%;
  animation: rotate 2s linear infinite;
  -webkit-animation: rotate 2s linear infinite;
}
#fixed {
  width: 100%;
  transform: rotate(135deg);
  animation: showfixed 4s steps(2) infinite;
  -webkit-animation: showfixed 4s linear infinite;
}
@-webkit-keyframes cliprotate {
  0% {
    transform: rotate(0deg);
  }
  100% {
    transform: rotate(360deg);
  }
}
@keyframes cliprotate {
  0% {
    transform: rotate(0deg);
  }
  100% {
    transform: rotate(360deg);
  }
}
@-webkit-keyframes rotate {
  0% {
    transform: rotate(-45deg);
  }
  100% {
    transform: rotate(135deg);
  }
}
@keyframes rotate {
  0% {
    transform: rotate(-45deg);
  }
  100% {
    transform: rotate(135deg);
  }
}
@-webkit-keyframes showfixed {
  0% {
    opacity: 0;
  }
  49.9% {
    opacity: 0;
  }
  50% {
    opacity: 1;
  }
  100% {
    opacity: 1;
  }
}
<div id="container">
  <div id="halfclip">
    <div class="halfcircle" id="clipped">
    </div>
  </div>
  <div class="halfcircle" id="fixed">
  </div>
</div>

Drawing (with SVG)

Taking advantage of SVG is probably the best way to address this problem, as it's explicitly designed to handle drawing within the browser. I'd highly recommend that approach if SVG support is available.

Dylan's response details what this implementation might look like.

4
  • This gives me the static representation of a 3/4 full circle but it doesn't allow me to smoothly draw the outline along the circumference.
    – colindunn
    Feb 14, 2017 at 19:53
  • Ah, I seem to have misunderstood what you were looking for. You can animate the same example provided using keyframes (i.e. to make the given icon rotate indefinitely). Do you want the circle to basically appear a a single dot, draw the circle and then begin again? Feb 14, 2017 at 20:00
  • @RionWilliams wow the drawing method without SVG is pretty crazy! I wouldn't have thought it was possible, brilliant idea to whoever thought it up. Feb 14, 2017 at 20:29
  • Yeah, it's pretty wild :) Feb 14, 2017 at 20:32
6

You can just take a pseudo element ::after to create the open part, with just overlapping the circle element. Advantage is, that the open part can be as long as wished (not limited to a 3/4 full circle).

.circle {
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  border: 2px solid;
  border-radius: 50%;
  margin: 30px;
  animation: rotate 1s infinite linear;
}
.circle::after {
  content: "";
  display: block;
  width: 80px;
  height: 80px;
  background: white;
  border-radius: 50%;
  margin: -30% 0 0 -30%;
}
@keyframes rotate {
  0%    { transform: rotate(0deg);  }
  100%  { transform: rotate(360deg);  }
}
<div class="circle"></div>

1

for the pseudo version, you can also use linear-gradient (shade can be decreased or increased) and background-clip,

where it is avalaible, mix-blend-mode can make it translucide,

currentcolor and animation can also be used to animate color :

.loader {
  font-size: 1.5em;
  color: gray;
  position: relative;
  padding: 3px;
  /* make a square */
  height: 100px;
  width: 100px;
  /* center content*/
  display: flex;
  align-items: center;
  justify-content: center;
  animation: coloranim infinite 5s;
}

.circle {
  border-radius: 100%;
  overflow: hidden;
}

.loader:after {
  border-radius: inherit;
  color: inherit;
  content: '';
  position: absolute;
  top: 0;
  bottom: 0;
  left: 0;
  right: 0;
  padding: 3px;
  background: linear-gradient(white, white), linear-gradient(0deg, transparent 40%, currentcolor 60%), linear-gradient(50deg, transparent 50%, currentcolor 52%);
  background-clip: content-box, border-box, border-box;
  z-index: -1;
  mix-blend-mode: multiply;/* if avalaible, else bg remains white */
}

.spin:after {
  animation: spin 2s linear infinite;
}

@keyframes spin {
  to {
    transform: rotate(360deg);
  }
}

@keyframes coloranim {
  20% {
    color: tomato;
  }
  40% {
    color: purple;
  }
  60% {
    color: turquoise;
  }
  80% {
    color: green;
  }
}


/* demo purpose, use your own style wherever your loader is needed */

html {
  height: 100%;
  display: flex;
  background: url(http://lorempixel.com/800/800/food/3);
  background-size: cover;
  box-shadow: inset 0 0 0 2000px rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.3)
}

body {
  margin: auto;
}
<div class="spin circle loader coloranim"> loading... </div>

http://codepen.io/gc-nomade/pen/YNbmGE

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