15

I came across https://minimill.co/ and saw it as a good example to what I'm trying to achieve.

I made an attempt to display the listed items like the site:

.wrap {
    display: block;
    list-style: none;
    position: relative;
    padding: 0;
    margin: 0;
    border: 0;

    li {
        background-color: green;
    }
}

.content {
    margin: 0 auto;
    max-width: 66rem;
    width: 90%;
    padding: 0;
    border: 0;
    position: relative;
}

.right-details {
    display: inline-block;
    float: right;
    box-size: border-box;
    width: 33.33333%;
}

.left-img {
    display: inline-block;
    float: left;
    box-sizing: border-box;
    width: 66.66666%;

    img {
        width: 50px;
    }
}
<ul class="wrap">
    <li>
        <div class="content">
            <div class="left-img">
                <img src="/assets/img/macbook-image.png"/>
            </div>
            <h2 class="right-details">
                Item 1
            </h2>
        </div>
    </li>
    <li>
        <div>
            <h2>
                Item 2
            </h2>
        </div>
    </li>
</ul>

But the first <li> disappears.

How can I display my contents in one long scroll-like how https://minimill.co/ is doing? Am I doing it correctly as implemented on the site? Any guidance or insight on mimicking it more closely would be appreciated.

11
+25

You should use min-height:100vh instead of height:100vh;. Please check my fiddle

// select all elements with data-background attribute
var lis = document.querySelectorAll("[data-background]");
// create empty array
var heights = [];
// use for loop to "discover" all of the elements in lis array
for(var i = 0; i < lis.length; i++){
  // get element's distance from top
  var distanceFromTop = lis[i].offsetTop;
  // get value from data-backgrount attribute
  var background = lis[i].getAttribute("data-background");
  // push background and distance to heights array
  heights.push({background: background, distance: distanceFromTop});
};

// check if page was scrolled
window.addEventListener("scroll", function(evt){
    // if page was scrolled what's the user's distance from top
	var distanceFromTop = this.scrollY;
 
  // find distances in heights array
  heights.forEach(function(height) {
    // check if user reached another checkpoint
    if(height.distance < distanceFromTop) {
            // if so, change the background to value that we got from data-background attribute
            // 
			document.body.className = height.background;
    }
  });
});
body {
  transition: background-color .8s ease;
  -webkit-transition: background-color .8s ease;
}

body.blue { background-color: #39f; }
body.red { background-color: #FF351A; }
body.dark { background-color: #222; }
body.yellow { background-color: #fd3; }
body.deep-blue { background-color: #417ABA; }
body.white { background-color: #fff; }
body.beige { background-color: #F7D693; }

li {
  min-height: 100vh;
  list-style-type:none;
}
<body class="blue">
  <ul>
    <li data-background="blue"></li>
    <li data-background="red"></li>
    <li data-background="dark"></li>
    <li data-background="yellow"></li>
    <li data-background="deep-blue"></li>
    <li data-background="white"></li>
    <li data-background="beige"></li>
  </ul>
</body>

You should use min-height:100vh instead of height:100vh;. Please check my fiddle

  • Appreciate the response! Before I accept the answer and upvote, as a learning purpose, could you comment on the Javascript portion for clarification? Also, could you show how they are displaying the content with the picture and description per color? Thank you in advance! – Jo Ko Feb 27 '17 at 23:26
  • Thank you but how are they displaying the content with the picture and description per color? – Jo Ko Feb 28 '17 at 17:51
8

So easiest approach seems to be using height: 100vh;, which stands for hundredths of the viewport height. (see: quirksmode.org).

body, ul, li {
  height: 100%;
}
li { height: 100vh; }
ul { list-style-type: none; }
.a { background-color: red; }
.b { background-color: yellow; }
.c { background-color: black; }
.d { background-color: green; }
.e { background-color: orange; }
.f { background-color: pink; }
<body>
    <ul>
        <li class="a"></li>
        <li class="b"></li>
        <li class="c"></li>
        <li class="d"></li>
        <li class="e"></li>
        <li class="e"></li>

    </ul>
</body>

But: it is not supported for IE <= 10 and Android <= 4.3. (see: caniuse).

What minimill does on their website is using two <ul> tags:

  1. <ul class="backgrounds"> which has it's position: fixed (love self-descriptive class names);
  2. <ul class="sections"> which stores actual content of the web site;
  3. and the key to make it all work: .sections li with padding: 16rem 0 0; (which means: padding-top: 16rem;). It is all customized to the need of images they use.

See here:

body, li, ul { /* RESET */
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
    border: 0;
    font: inherit;
    vertical-align: baseline;
}
html, body { height: 100%; }
body {
    line-height: 1.5;
    position: relative;
}
ul { list-style-type: none; }
.backgrounds {
    height: 100%;
    display: block;
    bottom: 0;
    left: 0;
    position: fixed;
    right: 0;
    top: 0;
    z-index: 1;
}
.backgrounds li {
    height: 100%;
    left: 0;
    opacity: 0;
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    transition: .5s ease opacity;
    width: 100%;
    z-index: 1;
}
.sections {
    position: relative;
    transition: .5s ease opacity;
    z-index: 2;
}
.sections li { padding: 16rem 0 0; }

.a { background-color: red; }
.b { background-color: yellow; }
.c { background-color: black; }
.d { background-color: green; }
.e { background-color: orange; }
.f { background-color: pink; }
<body>
    <ul class="backgrounds">
        <li class="a"></li>
        <li class="b"></li>
        <li class="c"></li>
        <li class="d"></li>
        <li class="e"></li>
        <li class="f"></li>

    </ul>
    <ul class="sections">
      <li class="a"><p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet;</p></li>
      <li class="b"><p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet;</p></li>
      <li class="c"><p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet;</p></li>
      <li class="d"><p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet;</p></li>
      <li class="e"><p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet;</p></li>
      <li class="f"><p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet;</p></li>
    </ul>
</body>

Furthermore, all the background swaping is made with JS.

6

Based on the example you provided, the first list item should be height: 100vh; and the height of the other items will be based on the content itself. In the code below, I added a bit of script that scrolls from the first item to the second when the "Scroll Down" anchor tag is clicked.

Check out my jsfiddle.

Here's the HTML:

<ul id="wrap">
  <li>
    <div>
      <h2>Item 1</h2>
      <div id="scroll-down">
        <a href="javascript:void(0)">Scroll Down</a>
      </div>
    </div>
  </li>
  <li id="scrollto">
    <div>
      <h2>Item 2</h2>
    </div>
  </li>
  <li>
    <div>
      <h2>Item 3</h2>
    </div>
  </li>
</ul>

Here's the SCSS:

$width: 100%;
$height: 100%;

html, body {
  width: $width;
  height: $height;
  margin: 0;
  padding: 0;
}
#wrap {
  display: inline-block;
  list-style: none;
  padding: 0;
  margin: 0;
  width: $width;
  height: $height;
  li {
    display: block;
    overflow: hidden;
    position: relative;
    width: $width;
  }
  li:first-child {
    background-color: green;
    height: 100vh;
  }
  li:not(:first-child) {
    min-height: 400px;
  }
  li:nth-child(2) {
    background-color: lightgreen;
  }
  li:last-of-type {
    background-color: lightblue;
  }
}
h2 {
  margin-top: 0;
}
#scroll-down {
  position: absolute;
  bottom: 15px;
  width: $width;
}
#scroll-down a {
  display: block;
  text-align: center;
  color: #ffffff;
}

Here's a bit of JQuery:

$(document).ready(function(){
  $("#scroll-down").click(function() {
    $('html, body').animate({
      scrollTop: $("#scrollto").offset().top
    }, 1000);
  });
});
2

What you are looking at https://minimill.co/ is in fact two ul's, one is being used to show the background color and the other is used to show the content. It seems that the ul associated with the background color does have a javascript event listener that tracks your the window scroll and depending on what content is being shown, the corresponding background color is displayed.

enter image description here

Yes, you are on the right path. In fact, this particular page has a very large top padding (16rem = 16 * 16px = 256px) to centralize the content and depending on the window size, it has different css classes.

enter image description here enter image description here

Regarding your question, I did try it and the first item appears to me.

  • Before I accept the answer and upvote, do you mind showing one working with the same properties? Mine for some reason still doesn't show up. – Jo Ko Feb 14 '17 at 23:01
  • Just checking in to see if you've seen my previous comment. Please let me know. – Jo Ko Feb 15 '17 at 17:44
2

It depends on what from Minimill's site, that you want to achieve. Minimill does have that fancy background-color-change, which is an event-listener - but it sounds like, that you just want to have the sections as they do?

Such as:

Section about: We are Minimill
Section about: Redspread
Section about: KPCB
...
...

If it's just that you want to have sections in the same way, then that can achieve quite easily. If you haven't heard of it, then I would point you in the direction of Bootstrap which is a CSS-library that does A LOT for you. When I first heard of it, then I thought 'That sounds like a hassle to look into', - but it's really quite magical, how much time you save by spending a couple of hours understanding how it works.

You can also code the whole thing yourself, such as: https://jsfiddle.net/2awczzcc/2/

And here's the code:

<ul class="wrap">
<li>
 <div class="content">
  <div class="left-container">
   <img src="http://vignette2.wikia.nocookie.net/fantheories/images/4/43/Toy-Story-Theme-Song-6.jpg/revision/latest?cb=20140624192735"/>
  </div>

  <div class="right-container">
   <h2>
   Item 1
   </h2>
   <p>
   Text text text.
   </p>
  </div>
 </div>
</li>

<li>
 <div class="content">
  <div class="left-container">
   <img src="http://vignette2.wikia.nocookie.net/fantheories/images/4/43/Toy-Story-Theme-Song-6.jpg/revision/latest?cb=20140624192735"/>
  </div>

  <div class="right-container">
   <h2>
   Item 2
   </h2>
   <p>
   Text text text.
   </p>
  </div>
 </div>
</li>

<li>
 <div class="content">
  <div class="left-container">
   <img src="http://vignette2.wikia.nocookie.net/fantheories/images/4/43/Toy-Story-Theme-Song-6.jpg/revision/latest?cb=20140624192735"/>
  </div>

  <div class="right-container">
   <h2>
   Item 2
   </h2>
   <p>
   More text, more text, more text.
   </p>
  </div>
 </div>
</li>
</ul>

And the CSS:

.wrap {
  display: block;
  list-style: none;
  position: relative;
  padding: 0;
  margin: 0;
  border: 0;
  width: 100%;
}

  .wrap li {
    width: 100%;
    clear: both; 
    display: block; 
    min-height: 200px;
    float: left;
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
  }

  .wrap li:first-child {
    background-color: green;
  }

  .wrap li:nth-child(2) {
    background-color: blue;
  }

  .wrap li:nth-child(3) {
    background-color: yellow;
  }

.content {
  margin: 0 auto;
  max-width: 66rem;
  width: 90%;
  padding: 0;
  border: 0;
  position: relative;
}

.left-container {
  float: left; 
  width: 48%;
  overflow: hidden;
}

.right-container {
  float: right; 
  width: 48%;
  overflow: hidden;
}

.left-container img {
  display: inline-block;
  float: left;
  box-sizing: border-box;
  max-width: 100%;
  height: auto;
  margin: 25px 0 0 0;
}
2

Link to jsFiddle
HTML Code:

<ul>
<li id="one" data-color="#16A085">
<h2>Section One</h2>
</li>
<li id="two" data-color="#C0392B">
  <h2>Section Two</h2>
</li>
<li id="three" data-color="#ff44AD">
  <h2>Section Three</h2>
</li>
<li id="four" data-color="#f88f18">
  <h2>Section Four</h2>
</li>
<li id="five" data-color="#E91E63">
  <h2>Section Five</h2>
</li>

</ul>

Javascript

$(window).on("scroll touchmove", function() {

  if ($(document).scrollTop() >= $("#one").position().top) {
    $('body').css('background', $("#one").attr("data-color"));
  };

  if ($(document).scrollTop() > $("#two").position().top) {
    $('body').css('background', $("#two").attr("data-color"))
  };

  if ($(document).scrollTop() > $("#three").position().top) {
    $('body').css('background', $("#three").attr("data-color"))
  };

  if ($(document).scrollTop() > $("#four").position().top) {
    $('body').css('background', $("#four").attr("data-color"))
  };
   if ($(document).scrollTop() > $("#five").position().top) {
    $('body').css('background', $("#five").attr("data-color"))
  };

});

CSS

li {
  display: block;
  width: 100%;
  height: 100vh;
}
body {
  background: #16A085;
  color: #fff;
  margin: 0;
  transition: all 550ms ease;
  will-change: background;
}
0

All you have to do is add height: 100vh; to the style for LI and you should be set.

Working codepen (I had to modify the CSS a bit since codepen doesn't support sass).

If I misunderstood the question and that's not what you're looking for, let me know.

  • It's not missing a }. the OP is using sass and that's how it works. – claudios Feb 21 '17 at 2:32
  • @claudios I'll edit my answer then. It was incompatible with codepen though so I had to move some things around in order to provide a working example of what they're trying to achieve with the scrolling. – Michael Feb 21 '17 at 2:36
0

You can set the height of ul or your div. Also, set overflow to auto:

<ul style="width: 300px; height: 200px; overflow: auto">
  <li>items</li>
  <li>items</li>

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.