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given a unsigned 64 bit integer. which has multiple bits set in it. want to process the bitmap and identify the position and return the string according to the position where bit is it. example: unsigned integer is 12. means 1100 which implies third bit and fourth bit are set. this should print THREE FOUR function takes unsigned int and returns string. I looked some pieces of code and i don't see this as a dup of some other question.

char* unsigned_int_to_string(unsigned long int n)
{
    unsigned int count = 0;
    while(n)
    {
        int i, iter;
        count += n & 1;
        n >>= 1;
     }

    /*** Need help to fill this block ***/
    /** should return string THREE FOUR***/
}


#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
    unsigned long int i = 12;
    printf("%s", unsigned_int_to_sring(i));
    return 0;
}
  • Why did You define the function to return char *, while what You are actually returning is unsigned int? – Matso Feb 15 '17 at 5:33
  • Matso, identify numbers of bits set, their positions and the deriving strings from them. pasted code which i tried. – MMR-bayarea-US Feb 15 '17 at 5:43
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You could brute force it by having a lookup table which has a word representation for each bit you're interested in.

char* bit_to_word[10] = { "ONE","TWO","THREE","FOUR","FIVE","SIX","SEVEN","EIGHT","NINE","TEN" }; // and so forth...

Then in your function check every bit and if it is set, concatenate the corresponding word from your bit_to_word array. You can safely do this by using the strcat_s function.

strcat_s(number_string, BUF_SIZE, bit_to_word[i]);

One gotcha. After the first word you will want to add a space as well so you might want to keep track of that.

This code checks the first 10 bits of the number and prints out THREE FOUR for the test case. Be aware though that it doesn't do any memory cleanup.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>    

#define BUF_SIZE 2048

char* bit_to_word[10] = { "ONE","TWO","THREE","FOUR","FIVE","SIX","SEVEN","EIGHT","NINE","TEN" };

char* unsigned_int_to_string(unsigned long int n)
{   
    char* number_string = (char*)malloc(BUF_SIZE);
    memset(number_string, 0, BUF_SIZE);

    int first_word = 1;
    unsigned long int tester = 1;
    int err;
    for (unsigned long int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        if (tester & n)
        {
            if (!first_word)
            {
                strcat_s(number_string, BUF_SIZE, " ");
            }
            err = strcat_s(number_string, BUF_SIZE, bit_to_word[i]);
            if (err)
            {
                printf("Something went wrong...\n");
            }
            first_word = 0;
        }
        tester <<= 1;
    }

    return number_string;
}

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    char* res = unsigned_int_to_string(0b1100);
    printf("%s\n", res);
} 
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Without writing the actual code, here is the description of a simple algorithm based on a 64 element lookup table of strings. 0 = ZERO, 1 = ONE, 2 = TWO ... 63 = SIXTY THREE. This table will be a 64 element array of strings. For C, you could make a static 2D array using char[256] to hold your strings (or optimize by using the value of the largest string + 1), or you could make a dynamic using malloc in a For Loop)

You then define your output string.

You then write a For Loop, iterating through all the bits using a bit mask (using left shift) if the Bit is set you can concatenate your output string (using strcat) with a space and the contents of your lookup table for that bit position.

Here is a brief code snippet on how you will do the concatenation: (Make sure you output string has enough memory in the outputstring variable to hold the largest string. If you want to be more sophisticated and optimize mem usage, you could use malloc and realloc, but you have to deal with freeing the memory when it is no longer needed.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int main ()
{
  char str[80];
  strcpy (str,"these ");
  strcat (str,"strings ");
  strcat (str,"are ");
  strcat (str,"concatenated.");
  puts (str);
  return 0;

}

In your case, bit 3 will be encountered as the first set bit and the output string will then contain "THREE", then on the next iteration bit 4 will be detected as set and the output will be appended as "THREE FOUR".

Note: Because this appears to be an academic problem I would like to point out that there exists here the classical case of complexity vs space trade off. My description above was minimum complexity at the expense of space. Meaning, you will have 64 strings with redundancy in many of these strings. For example: TWENTY TWO, THIRTY TWO, FOURTY TWO, FIFTY TWO, and SIXTY TWO, all contain the string "TWO". Space could be optimized by using half the strings: ZERO, ONE, through NINETEEN, then TWENTY, THIRTY, FORTY, FIFTY, SIXTY. However, your indexing logic will be more complicated for bits greater than TWENTY. for bit 21 you will need to concatenate TWENTY and ONE.

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