Today, I stumbled over something in Perl I was not aware of: it "localizes" the variable that the elements of the list iterated over is assigned to.

This, of course, is documented in the Perl documentation - however I failed to remember or read it.

The following script demonstrates what I mean:

use warnings;
use strict;

my $g = 99;

foreach $g (1..5) {
  p($g);
}

sub p {
  my $l = shift;
  printf ("%2d %2d\n", $g, $l);
}

The script prints

99  1
99  2
99  3
99  4
99  5

because $g is "localized" to the foreach loop.

As far as I can tell there is no difference if I had added my to $g in the foreach loop:

foreach my $g (1..5) {

Actually, I ended up doing it because I feel it makes it clearer that the variable is local to the loop.

My question is now: is there a scenario where my using my does make a difference (given that $g is already declared globally).

  • 2
    The foreach does not require the my declaration if you have it declared globally. It is strange however that it will not complain that you are declaring it again. For instance if you remove the range, it will complain that you have already declared $g I will go and research this a bit. – user2082599 Feb 15 '17 at 8:27
  • If the variable was previously declared with my, it uses that variable instead of the global one, but it's still localized to the loop. This implicit localization occurs only in a foreach loop. perldoc.perl.org/perlsyn.html#Foreach-Loops – user3606329 Feb 15 '17 at 8:37
  • @user3606329 That is correct, but if you take that code and remove the range it will create an error. The variable is not yet inside the loop, it is part of the foreach statement. – user2082599 Feb 15 '17 at 8:43
up vote 8 down vote accepted

The investigated behavior is documented in Foreach Loops in perlsyn

The foreach loop iterates over a normal list value and sets the scalar variable VAR to be each element of the list in turn. If the variable is preceded with the keyword my, then it is lexically scoped, and is therefore visible only within the loop.

which continues to the explanation

Otherwise, the variable is implicitly local to the loop and regains its former value upon exiting the loop. If the variable was previously declared with my, it uses that variable instead of the global one, but it's still localized to the loop.

Thus there should be no difference between localizing it with my or leaving that to foreach.

A little curiosity is that

This implicit localization occurs only in a foreach loop.

All this is further clarified in this snippet from Private Variables via my() from perlsub

The foreach loop defaults to scoping its index variable dynamically in the manner of local. However, if the index variable is prefixed with the keyword my, or if there is already a lexical by that name in scope, then a new lexical is created instead.

Since a new lexical is created inside in both cases there cannot be any practical difference.

I absolutely support and recommend putting a my there.

  • That is understood. The problem I see here though is that $g is not yet within the loop. so if $g is not declared and assigned a value before, then $g is in fact an empty value. – user2082599 Feb 15 '17 at 8:47
  • @Gerry In foreach my $i (1..4) { } the scope of $i is restricted to the loop. It does not exist "before". The same is without my, if $i was declared before -- it is localized to the loop's scope as soon as it is seen. This is what the quote(s) above inform us. – zdim Feb 15 '17 at 8:54
  • ok, thanks zdim. That makes sense. – user2082599 Feb 15 '17 at 9:13

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