22

In C# / .NET you can do something like this:

someThing.text = "blah";
String blah = someThing.text;

However, the above code does not actually interact with the someThing's text String directly, it uses a get and set property. Similarly, read-only properties can be used.

Is there a way to do something similar in native C++? (not C++ .NET)

  • I'm NOT an expert, but why not let someThing.text be a public member if you're going to treat it like one anyway? – flies Nov 19 '10 at 16:29
  • 2
    Exposing members (even as read only) via getter and setters is bad OO. You are exposing the internal representation of your object to the world. Even if this is slightly protected by using methods (hidden behind syntactic sugar of properties) it provides a public API that must be maintained. The question is why are you trying to expose your members? Object should be using the internal representation to perform tasks not exposing it for other people to perform tasks. Rather than exposing the implementation expose an action method that uses the representation. – Martin York Nov 19 '10 at 19:42
  • I question the utility of paying an efficiency cost for obscuring the code. – Cheers and hth. - Alf Dec 26 '13 at 0:00
  • Possible duplicate of Does C++11 have C#-style properties? – Mehrdad Mirreza Nov 10 '16 at 9:18

10 Answers 10

19

In .NET properties are syntactic sugar for the real get and set functions which are emitted behind the scenes (in fact they are more than syntactic sugar because properties are emitted in the resulting IL and could be used with Reflection). So in C++ you would need to explicitly write those functions as there's no such notion as property.

  • But how does it know if the user wants to get or set? Does operator overloading need to be used? – jmasterx Nov 19 '10 at 12:47
  • 1
    When it is on the left hand-side of the assignment operator (=) you are setting, when it is on the right you are getting and the compiler is smart enough to figure this out. – Darin Dimitrov Nov 19 '10 at 13:19
  • Writing two functions on that will return a reference, and one that will return a const reference is very useful, the compiler will figure out when to call which. But this will allow to make these calls in any places (inside const functions). – Jbad26 Aug 5 '13 at 22:00
  • 1
    -1 as demonstrated by Moo-Juice's answer the "in C++ you would need to explicitly write those functions as there's no such notion as property" is trivially, directly wrong. And there are also other ways to properties in C++, including source code preprocessing. The technical possibility of portable properties in C++ does not, however, mean that it's a good idea to do it... :-) – Cheers and hth. - Alf Dec 26 '13 at 0:03
43

WARNING: This is a tongue-in-cheek response and is terrible!!!

Yes, it's sort of possible :)

template<typename T>
class Property
{
private:
    T& _value;

public:
    Property(T& value) : _value(value)
    {
    }   // eo ctor

    Property<T>& operator = (const T& val)
    {
        _value = val;
        return *this;
    };  // eo operator =

    operator const T&() const
    {
        return _value;
    };  // eo operator ()
};

Then declare your class, declaring properties for your members:

class Test
{
private:
    std::string _label;
    int         _width;

public:
    Test() : Label(_label)
           , Width(_width)
    {
    };

    Property<std::string> Label;
    Property<int>         Width;
};

And call C# style!

Test a;
a.Label = "blah";
a.Width = 5;

std::string label = a.Label;
int width = a.Width;
  • 11
    I've tried this in the past although I now tend to avoid it because people reading the code don't realise it's not just a public fields as it's not common in c++... However I was suprised to find that the compiler it usually good enough to make this just as efficient as assinging directly to the field. – jcoder Nov 19 '10 at 13:22
  • 7
    Finally, a good use for T* operator&() ;) – MSalters Nov 19 '10 at 15:31
  • 4
    @jcoder I don't get it. It essentially turns m_Test public. Why don't just make m_Test public in the first place and avoid any additional coding? – Ali Aug 5 '13 at 21:37
  • 7
    I have no idea why you'd preface this as "terrible." Granted, it's not quite so flexible as properties in C#, but when it comes to the syntactic candy factor (which is really all properties are), I think it's brilliant. A hearty and well earned +1 – Syndog Jan 10 '14 at 15:05
  • 2
    Thanks Moo-Juice, I was able to leverage this code to track down by using a breakpoint to find out how a member variable was getting set to a value that it was never supposed to be set to. The offending callsite had a bug. – Eljay Sep 9 '17 at 13:07
16

I warn you: It is not native C++; it's Microsoft-specific only. But you can use declspec(property):

struct S {
   int i;
   void putprop(int j) { 
      i = j;
   }

   int getprop() {
      return i;
   }

   __declspec(property(get = getprop, put = putprop)) int the_prop;
};

int main() {
   S s;
   s.the_prop = 5;    // THERE YOU GO
   return s.the_prop;
}

cf MSDN, declspec(property).

  • Still, this is great for those doing non X platform projects with MSVC! good find :) – jmasterx Nov 19 '10 at 13:10
  • 1
    whoa, I never heard of this... – Mooing Duck Jul 31 '13 at 23:18
8

Moo-Juice's answer looks really cool, but has a drawback: you can't use these properties like normal expressions of type T, as you can in C#.

For instance,

  • a.text.c_str() won't compile (‘class Property<std::basic_string<char> >’ has no member named ‘c_str’)
  • std::cout << a.text won't compile either (template argument deduction/substitution failed)

I would suggest the following enhancement to template<typename T> class Property:

T& operator() ()
{
    return _value;
}
T const& operator() () const
{
    return _value;
}

Then you can access the property's members with (), such as:

 char const *p = a.text().c_str();

And you can use the property in expressions where the type must be deduced:

std::cout << a.text();
2

Yes but it's vendor specific. Microsoft has declspec(property). C++Builder's implementation is a bit more advanced (via vendor specific __property keyword) in that you could have indexed accessors (which can be of any types you wish).

Also check this out (without relying on vendor specific keywords): http://www.codeproject.com/KB/cpp/cpp_property_indexer.aspx

2

A property in .NET is associated with a get and/or a set member function, so it's really just syntactic sugar. The closest you can get with C++ is to use overloading to give the getter and setter the same name:

const std::string &test() const { return text_; }
void test(const std::string &value) { text_ = value; }

Obviously, you will still have to provide parenthesis for the call:

someThing.text("blah");
String blah = someThing.text();
1
#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

// ------------------------------------------------------------------

#define PROPERTY_GET_SET(CLASS, NAME, TYPE) GetSetProperty<CLASS, TYPE> NAME() { return GetSetProperty<CLASS, TYPE>(this, &CLASS::get_##NAME, &CLASS::set_##NAME); }
#define PROPERTY_GET(CLASS, NAME, TYPE)     GetProperty<CLASS, TYPE> NAME()    { return GetProperty<CLASS, TYPE>(this, &CLASS::get_##NAME); }
#define PROPERTY_SET(CLASS, NAME, TYPE)     SetProperty<CLASS, TYPE> NAME()    { return SetProperty<CLASS, TYPE>(this, &CLASS::set_##NAME); }

template <typename CLASS, typename TYPE>
struct GetSetProperty {
    typedef TYPE (CLASS::*Getter_t)() const;
    typedef void (CLASS::*Setter_t)(TYPE);
    GetSetProperty(CLASS* instance, Getter_t getter, Setter_t setter) : m_instance(instance), m_getter(getter), m_setter(setter) {}
    operator TYPE() const { return (this->m_instance->*this->m_getter)(); }
    GetSetProperty<CLASS, TYPE>& operator=(TYPE value) { (this->m_instance->*this->m_setter)(value); return *this; }
    CLASS* const   m_instance;
    const Getter_t m_getter;
    const Setter_t m_setter;
};

template <typename CLASS, typename TYPE>
struct GetProperty {
    typedef TYPE (CLASS::*Getter_t)() const;
    GetProperty(CLASS* instance, Getter_t getter) : m_instance(instance), m_getter(getter) {}
    operator TYPE() const { return (this->m_instance->*this->m_getter)(); }
    CLASS* const   m_instance;
    const Getter_t m_getter;
};

template <typename CLASS, typename TYPE>
struct SetProperty {
    typedef void (CLASS::*Setter_t)(TYPE);
    SetProperty(CLASS* instance, Setter_t setter) : m_instance(instance), m_setter(setter) {}
    SetProperty<CLASS, TYPE>& operator=(TYPE value) { (this->m_instance->*this->m_setter)(value); return *this; }
    CLASS* const   m_instance;
    const Setter_t m_setter;
};

template <typename CLASS, typename TYPE>
ostream& operator<<(ostream& ostr, const GetSetProperty<CLASS, TYPE>& p) { ostr << (p.m_instance->*p.m_getter)(); return ostr; }

template <typename CLASS, typename TYPE>
ostream& operator<<(ostream& ostr, const GetProperty<CLASS, TYPE>& p) { ostr << (p.m_instance->*p.m_getter)(); return ostr; }

// ------------------------------------------------------------------

class Dummy
{
public:

    Dummy() : m_value1(42) {}

    PROPERTY_GET_SET(Dummy, Value1, int);
    PROPERTY_GET_SET(Dummy, Value2, const string&);

protected:

    virtual int           get_Value1() const { return this->m_value1; }
    virtual void          set_Value1(int value) { this->m_value1 = value; }

    virtual const string& get_Value2() const { return this->m_value2; }
    virtual void          set_Value2(const string& value) { this->m_value2 = value; }

private:

    int    m_value1;
    string m_value2;
};


int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {

    Dummy d;

    cout << d.Value1() << endl;
    d.Value1() = 3;
    cout << d.Value1() << endl;

    cout << d.Value2() << endl;
    d.Value2() = "test";
    cout << d.Value2() << endl;

    return 0;
}

// ------------------------------------------------------------------
0

No, there is not. You would just create getter and setter functions:

someThing.setText("blah");
std::string blah = someThing.getText();
0

Why not to use C# language instead of C++ for native development? For that you can use IL2BC utility to generate native code from C# source and/or MSIL byte-code?

IL2BC can be found at this site

http://csnative.codeplex.com

0

Probably the best option currently is to use the microsoft's __declspec( property( get=get_func_name, put=put_func_name ) ) PropertyType PropertyName attribute.

  • it is also supported by clang,
  • it is converted into your getter/setter when compiled (won't add any new variables),
  • in use, it is the closest thing to a real property (can access property of a property...).

But if you're using other compilers, you could use macros:

#define PROPERTY_GEN(Class, Type, Name, GetMethod, SetMethod) \
    class Property_##Name { \
    public: \
        Property_##Name(Class* parent) : _parent(parent) { } \
        Type operator = (Type value) \
        { \
            _parent->SetMethod(value); \
            return _parent->GetMethod(); \
        } \
        operator Type() const \
        { \
            return static_cast<const Class*>(_parent)->GetMethod(); \
        } \
        Property_##Name& operator =(const Property_##Name& other) \
        { \
            operator=(other._parent->GetMethod()); return *this; \
        }; \
        Property_##Name(const Property_##Name& other) = delete; \
    private: \
        Class* _parent; \
    } Name { this };


    // PROPERTY - Declares a property with the default getter/setter method names.
    #define PROPERTY(Class, Type, Name) \
        PROPERTY_GEN(Class, Type, Name, get_##Name, set_##Name)

Then use them like:

class SomeClass
{
public:
    PROPERTY(SomeClass, int, Value)
    int get_Value() const { return _value; }
    void set_Value(int value) { _value = value; }

private:
    int _value = 0;
};


int main()
{
    SomeClass s, c;
    s.Value = 5;
    c.Value = 3 * s.Value;
    s.Value = c.Value;
}

You could also add other macro variants for read-only, write-only properties and read-only non-const getters. To be able to access sub-properties via ->, you could add operator-> overloads to the macro.

Compared to microsoft's __declspec(property(...)), getter and setter methods can be made private but this isn't a real advantage since client might need to take the address of a getter/setter sometimes. There is also a disadvantage of having an additional _parent variable for every property, and you would need to explicitly define copy constructors for parent classes if they are used.

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