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I am trying to write a program which will take list of strings as input and create hash table with string name and its position.

Example:
vector words {"first", "second", "third", "forth", "second"};

output:
first 1
second 2,5
third 3
forth 4

I am facing two problems please find them in code comment below.
Please tell me what am i doing wrong?

int main()
{
    vector<string> words {"first", "second", "third", "forth", "second"};

    unordered_map<string, vector<int>> hash_table;
    unordered_map<string, vector<int>>::const_iterator hash_it;

    int loc = 1;

    for(auto n = words.begin(); n != words.end(); ++n){
        hash_it = hash_table.find(*n);
        if(hash_it == hash_table.end())
            hash_table.insert(make_pair(*n, vector<int> (loc)));
        else
            //hash_it->second.push_back(loc);   //Problem 1 - this statement gives error

        ++loc;
    }

    for(auto& n:hash_table){
        cout<<"Word - "<<n.first<<" Loc -";
        vector<int> tmp1 = n.second;
        for(auto j = tmp1.begin(); j != tmp1.end(); ++j)
            cout<<" "<<*j;
        cout<<endl;
    }
}

Problem 2 - location values are 0
Output of program -
Word - forth Loc - 0
Word - third Loc - 0
Word - second Loc - 0
Word - first Loc - 0

  • 1
    Welcome to Stack Overflow. Please take the time to read The Tour and refer to the material from the Help Center what and how you can ask here. – πάντα ῥεῖ Feb 15 '17 at 20:48
  • 1
    What error exactly was produced compilation failed? – BusyProgrammer Feb 15 '17 at 21:31
  • @ABusyProgrammer Error was - In function 'int main()': 23:42: error: passing 'const std::vector<int>' as 'this' argument of 'void std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::push_back(const value_type&) [with _Tp = int; _Alloc = std::allocator<int>; std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::value_type = int]' discards qualifiers [-fpermissive] – cplusplusnoob Feb 16 '17 at 21:47
3
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you overcomplicated the issue, operator[] on map or unordered_map are created specially for such cases:

int loc = 1;
for(auto n = words.begin(); n != words.end(); ++n)
   hash_table[*n].push_back( loc++ );

that is all code you need. you can make it even simpler using for range loop:

int loc = 1;
for(const auto &word: words)
   hash_table[word].push_back( loc++ );
| improve this answer | |
  • Thank you so much Slava, this saves a lot of effort and its pretty easy, now the code works perfectly. – cplusplusnoob Feb 15 '17 at 21:08
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0

The first problem is you are using const_iterator where you should be using iterator. You cannot modify the element referred to by const_iterator.

Use unordered_map<string, vector<int>>::iterator hash_it; instead of unordered_map<string, vector<int>>::const_iterator hash_it;. Better yet, use auto to automatically deduce the type to use.

for (auto n = words.begin(); n != words.end(); ++n) {
    auto hash_it = hash_table.find(*n);
//  ^^^^ Deduce the correct type
    if (hash_it == hash_table.end())
        hash_table.insert(make_pair(*n, vector<int>(loc)));
    else
        hash_it->second.push_back(loc);   //No problem

        ++loc;
}

The second problem is that the statement vector<int>(loc) makes a vector containing loc values, not a vector containing only loc. The simplest change is to use vector<int>(1, loc) instead, which makes 1 value equal to loc.

for (auto n = words.begin(); n != words.end(); ++n) {
    auto hash_it = hash_table.find(*n);
//  ^^^^ Deduce the correct type
    if (hash_it == hash_table.end())
        hash_table.insert(make_pair(*n, vector<int>(1, loc)));
    else
        hash_it->second.push_back(loc);   //Problem 1 - this statement gives error

    ++loc;
}

As others have pointed out, you can save yourself a lot of trouble by using operator[]. See this answer by Slava for a simpler way of doing this.

| improve this answer | |
  • Thank you so much François. I didn't realized its const iterator, now I get it why that line was not working. This is great help! – cplusplusnoob Feb 15 '17 at 21:11
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0

You could make the code more efficient if you use a unordered_multimap. You don't need a vector for the positions then. This works because elements that have the same key are guaranteed to be in consecutive order.

int main()
{
    vector<string> words {"first", "second", "third", "forth", "second"};

    unordered_multimap< string, size_t > hash_table;

    size_t loc = 0;
    for( const auto& word : words )
    {
        hash_table.insert( make_pair( word, ++loc ) );
    }

    for( auto i = hash_table.begin(), j = hash_table.begin(); 
         i != hash_table.end();
         i = j )
    {
        cout << "Word - "<< i->first << " Loc -";

        // Iterate over all elements with same key
        do
        {
            cout << " " << j->second;
            ++j;
        }
        while( j != hash_table.end() && j->first == i->first );

        cout << endl;
    }

    return 0;
}

If you only want to look up the locations of a specific word, you would use unordered_map::equal_range() like this:

cout << "Locations of 'second':";
auto rng = hash_table.equal_range( "second" );
for( auto i = rng.first; i != rng.second; ++i )
    cout << " " << i->second;
| improve this answer | |
  • please forgive my lack of knowledge but what does size_t do? does it store any type of information? – cplusplusnoob Feb 16 '17 at 21:55
  • size_t is usually defined as an unsigned integer type, but it depends on the platform. When you compile for 64-bit, size_t will usually be 64-bit too, while an integer (at least under Windows) would still be 32-bit and thus not be sufficient to store an index of a vector without overflow. That's the reason why this data type is used by all standard containers as the return type of the size() method for instance. – zett42 Feb 17 '17 at 0:53
  • I fixed my example to use size_t as the datatype of the 'loc' variable too. With 5 entries of the words vector this is of course not important, but consider a very big vector with more than 2^31 words... in this case the 'int loc' could already overflow. – zett42 Feb 17 '17 at 1:04

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