0

C (compiled with -O6) takes 16us or 4us for allocation of 2GB of memory:

💻 ./2d
115
16
💻 ./2d
31
4
💻 cat 2d.c
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <time.h>

int main() {
  struct timeval tm0,tm1,tm2,tm3;
  unsigned short *A,*B;

  gettimeofday(&tm0, NULL); A = malloc(2); gettimeofday(&tm1, NULL);
  gettimeofday(&tm2, NULL); B = malloc(2000000000); gettimeofday(&tm3, NULL);

  printf("%ld\n", 1000000 * (tm1.tv_sec - tm0.tv_sec) + (tm1.tv_usec - tm0.tv_usec) );
  printf("%ld\n", 1000000 * (tm3.tv_sec - tm2.tv_sec) + (tm3.tv_usec - tm2.tv_usec) );
}
💻  

node.js does need 3ms for unsafe allocation of 2GB of memory:

💻 node
> t0=process.hrtime(); var A=new Buffer.allocUnsafe(1); t1=process.hrtime(); 
[ 11473, 848540243 ]
> t2=process.hrtime(); var B=new Buffer.allocUnsafe(2000000000); t3=process.hrtime(); 
[ 11473, 860724500 ]
> 
> ((t1[1]-t0[1])/1000000000.0+(t1[0]-t0[0]))+" "+
... ((t3[1]-t2[1])/1000000000.0+(t3[0]-t2[0]));
'0.00004601 0.003662583'
> t0=process.hrtime(); var A=new Buffer.allocUnsafe(1); t1=process.hrtime(); 
[ 11477, 352424752 ]
> t2=process.hrtime(); var B=new Buffer.allocUnsafe(2000000000); t3=process.hrtime(); 
[ 11477, 357416910 ]
> 
> ((t1[1]-t0[1])/1000000000.0+(t1[0]-t0[0]))+" "+
... ((t3[1]-t2[1])/1000000000.0+(t3[0]-t2[0]));
'0.000017987 0.002890688'
> 

Shouldn't Buffer.allocUnsafe() runtime be similar to malloc()? https://nodejs.org/api/buffer.html#buffer_class_method_buffer_allocunsafe_size

Hermann.

  • 1
    Add code in both cases to fill the buffer with zeroes and watch what happens. – David Schwartz Feb 15 '17 at 23:11
  • The use case I am after is O(1) time check of edge existence in a graph by using an uninitialized 2d array -- initialization would take O(N^2) runtime for N vertices. So why the difference of Buffer.allocUnsafe() and malloc() runtimes? Should do the same thing ... – HermannSW Feb 15 '17 at 23:21
  • 1
    One just reserves space in an accounting system. The other actually allocates and maps pages of memory. – David Schwartz Feb 15 '17 at 23:23
  • From the nodejs.org link above: "The underlying memory for Buffer instances created in this way is not initialized. " Shouldn't that do exactly what malloc() does, just reserve space? – HermannSW Feb 15 '17 at 23:30
  • They mean that it's not guaranteed to be initialized, not that it's guaranteed to be uninitialized. For example, you might get a buffer that was previously used for some other purpose and still contains the data from before. – David Schwartz Feb 16 '17 at 7:09

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