23

What would be an elegant, efficient way for converting a list like [1,2,3,4] into the map %{1=>2, 3=>4}? I wrote this:

     Enum.reduce([1,2,3,4],%{}, fn(item, acc) ->
        case Map.get(acc, :last) do
          nil ->
            Map.put(acc, :last, item)
          last ->
            acc = Map.put(acc, item, last)
            Map.drop(acc, [:last])
        end
      end)

But this does not seem very elegant. Is there a more elegant and cleaner way of doing this?

1
  • 1
    One important question is: what do you want to happen when there's an odd number of elements in the original list? Drop the last value or assign it a default value of nil for example? With all solutions using Enum.chunk, you can supply default values via Enum.chunk(2, 2, [nil]), whereas a plain Enum.chunk(2) will discard chunks that cannot be filled completely. Commented Feb 17, 2017 at 8:24

4 Answers 4

35

You can avoid the extra call to Enum.map/2, and build the new map directly using Map.new/2:

[1,2,3,4]
|> Enum.chunk_every(2)
|> Map.new(fn [k, v] -> {k, v} end)

Update: The previous version of this answer used chunk/2 but that has been deprecated in favor of chunk_every/2.

28

You can use Enum.chunk_every/2:

[1, 2, 3, 4] 
  |> Enum.chunk_every(2) 
  |> Enum.map(fn [a, b] -> {a, b} end) 
  |> Map.new
14

Using Enum.into, which takes a transform function as second parameter:

list
|> Enum.chunk_every(2)
|> Enum.into(%{}, fn [a, b] -> {a, b} end)
9

You can use tail recursion to accomplish this:

defmodule Test do
  def f(list, acc \\ [])

  def f([x, y | xs], acc), do: f(xs, [{x, y} | acc])
  def f(_, acc), do: Map.new(acc)
end

This solution is more time efficient than the other solutions proposed. I wrote the following module to be able to benchmark the different solutions:

defmodule Benchmark do

  # My solution
  def alex(xs, acc \\ [])
  def alex([x, y | xs], acc), do: alex(xs, [{x, y} | acc])
  def alex(_, acc), do: Map.new(acc)

  # nietaki's solution
  def nietaki(xs) do
    xs
    |> Enum.chunk_every(2, 2, :discard)
    |> Enum.map(fn [x, y] -> {x, y} end)
    |> Map.new()
  end

  # Sheharyar's solution
  def sheharyar(xs) do
    xs
    |> Enum.chunk_every(2, 2, :discard)
    |> Map.new(fn [x, y] -> {x, y} end)
  end

  # Patrick's solution
  def patrick(xs) do
    xs
    |> Enum.chunk_every(2, 2,:discard)
    |> Enum.into(%{}, fn [x, y] -> {x, y} end)
  end

  # Your solution
  def chip(xs) do
    Enum.reduce(xs, %{}, fn(item, acc) ->
      case Map.get(acc, :last) do
        nil ->
          Map.put(acc, :last, item)
        last ->
          acc = Map.put(acc, item, last)
          Map.drop(acc, [:last])
      end
    end)
  end

  # Function to do the time benchmarks.
  def timed(f, list, times \\ 10) do
    tests =
      for _ <- 0..times do
        :timer.tc(fn -> apply(__MODULE__, f, [list]) end) |> elem(0)
      end
    avg = Enum.sum(tests) / times
    {f, avg}
  end

  # Test function.
  def test(list, times \\ 10) do
    list = Enum.to_list(list)
    [:alex, :chip, :patrick, :nietaki, :sheharyar]
    |> Stream.map(fn f -> timed(f, list, times) end)
    |> Enum.sort(fn {_, x}, {_, y} -> x < y end)
  end
end

So the bechmark for small lists is the following:

iex(1)> Benchmark.test(0..100)
[alex: 10.1, sheharyar: 27.7, nietaki: 27.8, patrick: 29.2, chip: 63.5]

And for large lists the following:

iex(2)> Benchmark.test(0..1_000_000)
[
  alex: 197784.6,
  patrick: 369645.9,
  nietaki: 370870.2,
  sheharyar: 372616.4,
  chip: 794839.6
]

The results are the average run time in microseconds and less is better. As you can see, good ol' tail recursion (Benchmark.alex/1) does a better job in this case.

I hope this help :)

2
  • 2
    Interesting answer. It's a shame that as the code gets more idiomatic, it gets slower :-( Commented Oct 8, 2018 at 3:34
  • 1
    On Elixir 1.7.1 Patrick's solution is even slower (but only the first time running): [alex: 0.5, chip: 0.8, sheharyar: 2.7, nietaki: 3.2, patrick: 232.6]. It also seems to intermittently perform better than one or two of the others on subsequent runs. I guess it's something to do with how the transform function to Enum.into/3 is evaluated. Commented Oct 8, 2018 at 3:52

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.