3

The Common Lisp Hyperspec page for print mentions this:

print is just like prin1 except that the printed representation of object is preceded by a newline and followed by a space.

This is the first time I've seen a function like this, and it threw me off the first time I used it, because I never expected that a function with such a common name might include an uncommon feature.

I'm looking for the original reason. I know it might simply be because that's how another then-common lisp might have done it, and common-lisp simply adopted it, but if that's the case I'm looking for the design reason in that other lisp.

I imagine it might have something to do with ensuring that the output is always readable with read straight out of print. Though I would've preferred a newline for this, I can guess that the trailing space might be so that in a stream, read can know that it's the end of an object and return it immediately without having to wait for the rest of the stream (the following prints). However, I still can't figure out the purpose behind the preceeding newline.

I've been looking through the HyperSpec, but I can't find a reason mentioned.

EDIT:

I looked into Common-Lisp's predecessors, specifically InterLisp, MacLisp, and MacLisp's predecessor Lisp 1.5.

Interlisp's (page 145 in this pdf) and Lisp 1.5's (page 140 in this pdf) print function print the object followed by a newline.

It seems it was MacLisp that introduced this difference. I didn't find a reason in the original reference manual, and I only found the following on this revised reference manual:

Like PRIN1, PRINT outputs object to file in a form that can be understood by READ. However, object is output preceded by newline and followed by a space so that repeated calls to PRINT can be done without having the end of one object run into the begining of the next.

Of course, the trailing newline in the original definition would've sufficed for that purpose, so this reason doesn't seem valid.

EDIT 2:

As shown by Rainer Joswig's answer, it seems that this change appeared in Lisp 1.6 before MacLisp.

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    I'm just guessing, but I'd hazard to say that the leading newline is simply a variant on a trailing newline (one standard is arguably just as good as the other); and that the trailing space is because when print was first written, you'd want to move the print-head of the mechanical TTY out of the way so that you could see what was written. – Dolda2000 Feb 16 '17 at 2:20
  • @Dolda2000 After looking into CL's predecessors and finding that originally print did simply output a trailing newline in Lisp 1.5, this seems unlikely. – JoL Feb 16 '17 at 16:17
5

See for example: PDP-6 LISP (LISP 1.6) Revised. (January 1967)

My guess would be that this variant of PRINT (which writes a newline, then the s-expression in readable format and then a space) entered the MIT branch of Lisp because of its use in the Read Eval Print Loop. See page 1 and 17 of above. From PDP-6 Lisp 1.6 it moved into what was then called Maclisp and beyond.

Jon L White would know it.

Look at the example for the REPL, the read eval PRINT loop, on page 1. Here I use a LispWorks Lisp listener, where the last closing parenthesis already makes READ accept the s-expression and no further enter is necessary:

CL-USER 25 > (PROG NIL
               A
               (TERPRI)
               (PRINT (EVAL (READ)))
               (GO A))

(+ 12 12)
24 
(+ 45 (*
       34
       12
       12))
4941 

Each result is on its own line. This is btw. also like the interaction on a MIT Lisp Machine - the last closing parenthesis enters the s-expression, the expression is evaluated and the value(s) printed.

Now imagine that it is defined to not print a newline first:

CL-USER 27 > (PROG NIL
               A
               (TERPRI)
               (PRIN1 (EVAL (READ)))
               (terpri)
               (GO A))

(+ 1 2)3

(* 23 (+ 1
         1
         3))115

The result would be printed directly after the last closing parenthesis.

Peter Norvig gives the same reasoning in his book Paradigms of Artificial Intelligence Programming, page 231/232 (as noted by user dkim):

In Lisp, however, the function print puts in a newline before the object to be printed, and a space after. ... In UNIX there was only one reasonable policy, because all input to the UNIX interpreter (the shell) is terminated by newlines, so there is no need for a newline-before. In some Lisp interpreters, however, input can be terminated by a matching right parenthesis. In that case, a newline-before is needed, lest the output appear on the same line as the input.

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    Quoted from PAIP: "In Lisp, however, the function print puts in a newline before the object to be printed, and a space after. ... In UNIX there was only one reasonable policy, because all input to the UNIX interpreter (the shell) is terminated by newlines, so there is no need for a newline-before. In some Lisp interpreters, however, input can be terminated by a matching right parenthesis. In that case, a newline-before is needed, lest the output appear on the same line as the input." – dkim Feb 16 '17 at 17:00
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    @jimg: you are using a Unix terminal. My example was from a LispWorks listener window, which is not terminal-based. Other Lisp systems also read Lisp expressions under Lisp control. For example in the REPL of a MIT Lisp Machine, the last closing parenthesis enters the expression, too. – Rainer Joswig Feb 16 '17 at 17:37
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    "last closing parenthesis enters the expression" so this behaviour was done to the benefit of systems that don't do line buffering. This is also supported with dkim's reference to PAIP. I believe that is the reason I was seeking. Think you can add that and dkim's reference to your answer? I'll accept it then. – JoL Feb 16 '17 at 17:55
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    @jimg: not only they don't do line-buffering, but they also may check/parse the s-expression syntax while you type the characters into the reader. – Rainer Joswig Feb 16 '17 at 18:27
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    @jlmg The listener tells you you've got something wrong, and then you get to delete characters and fix it up, at which point it will reparse the edited input. Essentially the listener is constantly aware of the current state of the input and it knows if it could make sense. These were very sophisticated readers! – tfb Feb 17 '17 at 18:31
2

Basically this is a REPL-only function, something along the lines of "poor man's trace or debug".

It's use case is something like

(map nil #'print list)

or, more generally,

(complex-traversal-map #'print weird-structure)

It inserts whitespace around the printed object to avoid interference with the output of other print calls. What kind of whitespace is emitted has evolved over the decades. It should have been called print-on-a-separate-line but it had to be short and easily guessable.

It's essentially "legacy" functionality, like rplaca and rplacd.

  • Sounds reasonable and this is probably what it's most useful for. If you happen to have a source on hand, that'd be great to mention, but I realize that an official reason might not be mentioned anywhere. Anyway, I'll accept this answer tomorrow, unless a better answer appears by then. – JoL Feb 16 '17 at 7:52

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