2
#include<iostream.h>
#include<conio.h>
class time
{
    private:
        int dd,mm,yy;
    public:
        friend istream & operator >>(istream &ip,time &t)
        {
            cout<<"\nEnter Date";
            ip>>t.dd;
            cout<<"\nEnter Month";
            ip>>t.mm;
            cout<<"\nEnter Year";
            ip>>t.yy;
            return ip;
        }
        friend ostream & operator <<(ostream &op,time &t)
        {
            op<<t.dd<<"/"<<t.mm<<"/"<<t.yy;
            return op;
        }

        void validate();
};

void time::validate()
{
}
int main()
{
    clrscr();
    time t1;
    cin>>t1;
    cout<<t1;
    getch();
    return 0;
}

What difference does it make? When I define the friend function outside the class the compiler is giving an error but when I define it inside a class it works perfectly fine.

Note: I am using Turbo C++. I know that's old school, but we are bound to use that.

7
  • 1
    <iostream.h> is not a standard header. It's never been part of the standard. But before the first standard, in 1998, it was part of the unofficial definition of C++, in the Annotated Reference Manual (by Stroustrup and Ellis). Feb 16, 2017 at 5:53
  • conio.h is a platform-specific non-standard header. Is it pertinent to your question? Feb 16, 2017 at 5:54
  • What error does the compiler give?
    – Aeonos
    Feb 16, 2017 at 6:05
  • Can you show us how exactly do you "define the friend function outside the class"? Feb 16, 2017 at 6:09
  • @SingerOfTheFall In his original post he had written, how he was going to implement it outside of the class, but not as a friend, which is not possible. It was edited by Biffen and removed.
    – Aeonos
    Feb 16, 2017 at 6:29

2 Answers 2

7

The problem is, that you are accessing private members of your class (dd,mm,yy), what is only allowed for functions of that class or friends. So you have to declare the function a friend inside of the class and than it can be implemented outside of the class.

class time
{
private:
    int dd,mm,yy;
public:
    friend istream & operator >>(istream &ip,time &t); // declare function as friend to allow private memeber access
    friend ostream & operator <<(ostream &op,time &t); // declare function as friend to allow private memeber access

    void validate();
};

Now you can write the implementation outside of the class and access private variables.

istream & operator >>(istream &ip,time &t)
{
    cout<<"\nEnter Date";
    ip>>t.dd;
    cout<<"\nEnter Month";
    ip>>t.mm;
    cout<<"\nEnter Year";
    ip>>t.yy;
    return ip;
}

ostream & operator <<(ostream &op,time &t)
{
    op<<t.dd<<"/"<<t.mm<<"/"<<t.yy;
    return op;
}
2
  • @Biffen - thanks, i corrected my mistake. private member variables can not be accessed by derived classes
    – Aeonos
    Feb 17, 2017 at 6:03
  • Also for compatibility sake we should declare friends inside a class definition and declared again outside the class for example in a header and defined in source code. This is required for some compilers.
    – Raindrop7
    Apr 26, 2019 at 20:03
1

Though the friend functions are inside the class it doesn't mean that they are the member functions of the class. So you should not refer the friend function outside of the class by using className::

struct time
{
    int dd = 28, mm = 04, yy = 2022;
    // friend function declaration
    friend ostream& operator <<(ostream& op, const time& t);
    // memeber function declaration
    void validate();
};

void time::validate() // time:: (must bcos it is a member function) 
{
    cout << dd << "/" << mm << "/" << yy << endl;
}

ostream& operator <<(ostream& op, const time& t)  // time:: (should NOT come bcos it is NOT a member function)
{
    op << t.dd << "/" << t.mm << "/" << t.yy << endl;
    return op;
}


int main() {
    time t;
    cout << t;    // 28/4/2022
    t.validate(); // 28/4/2022
}

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