16

I'm trying to make a deep copy of a generic list, and am wondering if there is any other way then creating the copying method and actually copying over each member one at a time. I have a class that looks somewhat like this:

public class Data
{            
    private string comment;
    public string Comment
    {
        get { return comment; }
        set { comment = value; }
    }

    private List<double> traceData;
    public List<double> TraceData
    {
        get { return traceData; }
        set { traceData = value; }
    }
}

And I have a list of the above data, i.e List<Data>. What I'm trying to do is plot a trace data of the subset of List onto a graph, possibly with some scaling or sweeping on the data. I obviously don't need to plot everything in the list because they don't fit into the screen.

I initially tried getting the subset of the list using the List.GetRange() method, but it seems that the underneath List<double> is being shallow copied instead of deep copied. When I get the subset again using List.GetRange(), I get previously modified data, not the raw data retrieved elsewhere.

Can anyone give me a direction on how to approach this? Thanks a lot.

  • Skeet edited but didn't know the answer? (8-O – Brad Nov 19 '10 at 16:02
  • 1
    Maybe I'm missing something, but what would be a "Deep copy" of a List<double>? It's a list of numbers, it's not like a list of Button classes or something that has members that might need to be copied? – CodingGorilla Nov 19 '10 at 16:04
  • I assume that he means he wants to make a deep copy of each Data object, implying that he needs to copy the list rather than just copy the reference. – mqp Nov 19 '10 at 16:08
  • Yes, sorry about the confusing words. Is there a way to deep copy only a setset of the List<Data> object? Thanks. – thomas1234 Nov 19 '10 at 16:08
  • Data.TraceData.GetRange() creates a copy of the specified subset - is that an option? (Here it doesn't matter that GetRange creates a shallow copy since doubles are value types.) – Jeff Sternal Nov 19 '10 at 16:11
10

The idiomatic way to approach this in C# is to implement ICloneable on your Data, and write a Clone method that does the deep copy (and then presumably a Enumerable.CloneRange method that can clone part of your list at once.) There isn't any built-in trick or framework method to make it easier than that.

Unless memory and performance are a real concern, I suggest that you try hard to redesign it to operate on immutable Data objects, though, instead. It'll wind up much simpler.

6

You can try this

    public static object DeepCopy(object obj)
    {
        if (obj == null)
            return null;
        Type type = obj.GetType();

        if (type.IsValueType || type == typeof(string))
        {
            return obj;
        }
        else if (type.IsArray)
        {
            Type elementType = Type.GetType(
                 type.FullName.Replace("[]", string.Empty));
            var array = obj as Array;
            Array copied = Array.CreateInstance(elementType, array.Length);
            for (int i = 0; i < array.Length; i++)
            {
                copied.SetValue(DeepCopy(array.GetValue(i)), i);
            }
            return Convert.ChangeType(copied, obj.GetType());
        }
        else if (type.IsClass)
        {

            object toret = Activator.CreateInstance(obj.GetType());
            FieldInfo[] fields = type.GetFields(BindingFlags.Public |
                        BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance);
            foreach (FieldInfo field in fields)
            {
                object fieldValue = field.GetValue(obj);
                if (fieldValue == null)
                    continue;
                field.SetValue(toret, DeepCopy(fieldValue));
            }
            return toret;
        }
        else
            throw new ArgumentException("Unknown type");
    }

Thanks to DetoX83 article on code project.

  • 2
    Almost flawless. But as it was in my case, you have arrays of objects outside either mscorlib or the current assembly, you will need to use elementType = Type.GetType(type.AssemblyQualifiedName.Replace("[]", string.Empty)); – makoshichi Feb 13 '15 at 12:57
5

If IClonable way is too tricky for you. I suggest converting to something and back. It can be done with BinaryFormatter or a Json Converter like Servicestack.Text since it is the fastest one in .Net.

Code should be something like this:

MyClass mc = new MyClass();
string json = mc.ToJson();
MyClass mcCloned = json.FromJson<MyClass>();

mcCloned will not reference mc.

3

The most easiest (but dirty) way is to implement ICloneable by your class and use next extension method:

public static IEnumerable<T> Clone<T>(this IEnumerable<T> collection) where T : ICloneable
{
    return collection.Select(item => (T)item.Clone());
}

Usage:

var list = new List<Data> { new Data { Comment = "comment", TraceData = new List { 1, 2, 3 } };
var newList = list.Clone();
  • 4
    ICloneable is like a rash, start scratching and before you know it it's everywhere. – jonnii Nov 19 '10 at 16:06
  • 2
    Should be noted that item.Clone() does not guarantee a deep copy, and the .MemberwiseClone() method create a shallow copy of internal members. See msdn: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… – Juliet Nov 19 '10 at 16:08
  • 1
    @Brad, @Juliet: That's why I called it dirty. – abatishchev Nov 19 '10 at 16:10
1

another thing you can do is mark your class as serializable and use binary serialization. Here is a working example

   public class Program
    {
        [Serializable]
        public class Test
        {
            public int Id { get; set; }
            public Test()
            {

            }
        }

        public static void Main()
        {   
            //create a list of 10 Test objects with Id's 0-10
            List<Test> firstList = Enumerable.Range(0,10).Select( x => new Test { Id = x } ).ToList();
            using (var stream = new System.IO.MemoryStream())

            {
                 var binaryFormatter = new System.Runtime.Serialization.Formatters.Binary.BinaryFormatter();
                 binaryFormatter.Serialize(stream, firstList); //serialize to stream
                 stream.Position = 0;
                 //deserialize from stream.
                 List<Test> secondList = binaryFormatter.Deserialize(stream) as List<Test>; 
            }


            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }
  • Most of the time, I'd recommend implementing a deep copy by hand if you can since serialization isn't exactly known for its blazing speed. However, I've actually used this style in the past with enormous trees of mutable data, and it works just fine for practical use. – Juliet Nov 20 '10 at 17:25
  • @Juliet, thanks, I was just providing an alternative solution to the ones that were already posted. – Stan R. Nov 20 '10 at 17:29
0

If you make your objects immutable you don't need to worry about passing around copies of them, then you could do something like:

var toPlot = list.Where(d => d.ShouldBePlotted());
0

Since your collection is mutable, you need to implement the deep copy programmatically:

public class Data
{
    public string Comment { get; set; }
    public List<double> TraceData { get; set; }

    public Data DeepCopy()
    {
        return new Data
        {
            Comment = this.Comment, 
            TraceData = this.TraceData != null
                ? new List<double>(this.TraceData)
                : null;
        }
    }
}

The Comment field can be shallow copied because its already an immutable class. You need to create a new list for TraceData, but the elements themselves are immutable and require no special handling to copy them.

When I get the subset again using List.GetRange(), I get previously modified data, not the raw data retrieved elsewhere.

Use your new DeepCopy method as such:

var pointsInRange = dataPoints
    .Select(x => x.DeepCopy())
    .GetRange(start, length);
0
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace DeepListCopy_testingSome
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            List<int> list1 = new List<int>();
            List<int> list2 = new List<int>();

            //populate list1
            for (int i = 0; i < 20; i++)
            {
                list1.Add(1);
            }

            ///////
            Console.WriteLine("\n int in each list1 element is:\n");
            ///////

            foreach (int i in list1)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(" list1 elements: {0}", i);
                list2.Add(1);
            }

            ///////
            Console.WriteLine("\n int in each list2 element is:\n");
            ///////

            foreach (int i in list2)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(" list2 elements: {0}", i);
            }

            ///////enter code here

            for (int i = 0; i < list2.Count; i++)
            {
                list2[i] = 2;
            }



            ///////
            Console.WriteLine("\n Printing list1 and list2 respectively to show\n"
                            + " there is two independent lists,i e, two differens"
                            + "\n memory locations after modifying list2\n\n");
            foreach (int i in list1)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(" Printing list1 elements: {0}", i);
            }

            ///////
            Console.WriteLine("\n\n");
            ///////

            foreach (int i in list2)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(" Printing list2 elements: {0}", i);
            }

            Console.ReadKey();
        }//end of Static void Main
    }//end of class
}
  • Try using a collection of objects that are not primitives. Then your example will not work. Edit: Well now I see you are not even populating list 2 with list 1! This is not related to the question.. – Tadija Bagarić Feb 27 '17 at 15:58
0

One quick and generic way to deeply serialize an object is to use JSON.net. The following extension method allows serializing of a list of any arbitrary objects, but is able to skip Entity Framework navigation properties, since these may lead to circular dependencies and unwanted data fetches.

Method

public static List<T> DeepClone<T>(this IList<T> list, bool ignoreVirtualProps = false)
{
    JsonSerializerSettings settings = new JsonSerializerSettings();
    if (ignoreVirtualProps)
    {
        settings.ContractResolver = new IgnoreNavigationPropsResolver();
        settings.PreserveReferencesHandling = PreserveReferencesHandling.None;
        settings.ReferenceLoopHandling = ReferenceLoopHandling.Ignore;
        settings.Formatting = Formatting.Indented;
    }

    var serialized = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(list, settings);
    return JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<List<T>>(serialized);
}

Usage

var clonedList = list.DeepClone();

By default, JSON.NET serializes only public properties. If private properties must be also cloned, this solution can be used.

This method allows for quick (de)serialization of complex hierarchies of objects.

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