7

We're a development shop that still does most of our development in .net 2.0. We're starting to think about using some of the new things in 3.5 (LINQ, etc) and there are some other software packages we're looking at that need WPF and so on.

We'd like to get 3.5 up and running on our test server, but without wrecking any of the 2.0 sites we already have running (and we'd like them to keep running under 2.0). Are there any hidden issues I should know about, or can I just install 3.5 on our Server 2003 machine and be good to go?

(The specific concern being that despite Microsoft claiming the .net 2.0 components are the same in 3.5, that they actually changed something game-breaking.)

Update: Bolstered on by everyone's comments here and other reading, we decided to bite the bullet and install 3.5 on the server "just to see what happens."

On running the install program, we discovered (to our not inconsiderable surprise) that .net 3.5 had been installed back in August - and none of us had known about it.

Which, really, is about as seamless an upgrade as you can ask for.

Thanks, everybody!

2

3.5 is an extension if 2.0. There is no 3.5 without 2.0. Its actually a different dll (Core.dll). This isn't like the move from 1.1 to 2.0; if your older sites don't reference the new dll, then those sites do not get altered whatsoever.

  • Core.dll is not a different dll, it is just another dll, along with mscorlib and System which is loaded into the app domain. – casperOne Jan 8 '09 at 0:34
  • I meant that the original 2.0 dll (mscorlib) was not modified. – Giovanni Galbo Jan 8 '09 at 0:38
  • Aha, good to know. Thanks. – Electrons_Ahoy Jan 8 '09 at 0:39
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2.0 will play nicely with 3.5. .NET 3.5 is really just some extra classes added on top on 2.0, so everything is compatible. I moved a bunch of projects from 2.0 to 3.5, and everything migrated very smoothly, with just a recompile.

  • This applies to web apps as well? – Electrons_Ahoy Jan 8 '09 at 0:39
  • That answer is wrong. 3.5 replaces certain 2.0 parts, so you need to regression test – Stephan Eggermont Jan 8 '09 at 0:43
  • no it's absolutely correct. – Micah Jan 8 '09 at 1:28
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.Net 3.5 is, essentially a set of additional assemblies that run side-by-side with the 2.0 libraries. Not a single breaking change occurred to any of the existing 2.0 libraries. You can directly convert all of your 2.0 applications to 3.5 without a single problem. This includes running 2.0 applications on the 3.5 framework. Some optimizations and bug fixes were made to 2.0, but all public interfaces remain unchanged. This applies to all namespace including System.Web.

There were a lot of new features added in 3.0 and 3.5 versions of the framework such as WPF, entity framework, and several other "frameworks". Classes were added to existing namespaces but, they actually live in separate dll's.

One thing to note as FryGuy points out:

Be careful about installing 3.5 SP1, because it also installs 2.0 SP2, which adds some extra functions. This would be fine, except for visual studio will use IntelliSense and everything will compile fine and work great on the developer machine, but completely fail with an obscure error on computers with "just" 2.0.

An example of this is the method ManualResetEvent.WaitOne. SP1 added the overload WaitOne(int), whereas without it, you need to call WaitOne(int, false).

As CMS posted from 4GuysFromRolla:

Additive versions of the .NET Frameworks
(source: 4guysfromrolla.com)

3

Yes, but with a caveat.

Be careful about installing 3.5 SP1, because it also installs 2.0 SP2, which adds some extra functions. This would be fine, except for visual studio will use IntelliSense and everything will compile fine and work great on the developer machine, but completely fail with an obscure error on computers with "just" 2.0.

An example of this is the method ManualResetEvent.WaitOne. SP1 added the overload WaitOne(int), whereas without it, you need to call WaitOne(int, false).

1

Just to add, the .NET versions are meant to work together, not just the 2.0/3.0/3.5 thing. You can also run 1.1 along side and it will be just fine.

1

I've done this on two very large systems in the past couple years and had absolutely no problems in either case. 3.5 runs on top of the 2.0 runtime.

3.0 should really have been 2.1, and 3.5 should have been 2.5. If that helps any. 3.0 and 3.5 are really just functionality extensions to 2.0, and don't include their own runtime. The service pack releases to 2.0 are where changes to 2.0 are found.

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Besides all answers provided, and as you must have your job at stake, you should try it first in a test server before deploying in a production server.

In my experience we had no problem upgrading to .NET 3.5 on our Web Servers.

  • Excellent point. We did use the testing server - but we're a small shop and only have the one, so even installing it there led to some nerves around the office. Still, alls well that ends well... – Electrons_Ahoy Jan 8 '09 at 20:26
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As all said, you'll have no problems:

Additive versions of the .NET Frameworks
(source: 4guysfromrolla.com)

:-)

  • You know the difference between marketing and real life, do you? – Stephan Eggermont Jan 8 '09 at 9:10
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No you cannot. It is likely to work, but 3.5 replaces certain 2.0 parts, so you need to regression test.

[edit]Don't vote down if you don't like the answer.

I specifically asked this question at TechEd. Keeping the same API doesn't mean the implementation behaves the same. At the time, the speaker response was: performance improvements (no details).

To repeat myself, as it doesn't seem to register: the API is the same, the implementation is different (as you can see in the Hanselman link in the comments). Micah, you don't seem to know where you're talking about.

  • Can you give an example of something that is replaced and not amended? – Giovanni Galbo Jan 8 '09 at 0:47
  • Yes please, examples would be excellent. – Electrons_Ahoy Jan 8 '09 at 0:51
  • Well 3.5 includes .net 2.0 SP1 & 2 which I'd assume replaces pieces of the 2.0 framework. of course it better not be breaking change but you never know... – JoshBerke Jan 8 '09 at 1:03
  • And some BCL were modified for linq but it should not affect you: hanselman.com/blog/… – JoshBerke Jan 8 '09 at 1:05

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