15

I am reading Nick Hodges online and I have discovered the Queue but it is not behaving as I've expected and I couldn't understand what him and the documentation say. Look at this code:

 TThread.CreateAnonymousThread(
  procedure
   begin

     TThread.Queue(TThread.Current, procedure
                                          begin
                                           Memo1.Lines.Clear;
                                           Memo1.Lines.Add('start');
                                          end);

     Sleep(2000);

     TThread.Synchronize(TThread.Current, procedure
                                          begin
                                           Memo1.Lines.Add('end');
                                          end);

   end
 ).Start;

I always use Synchronize but this time I have tried with Queue because according to Nick it is better in case of multiple requests since they won't be "serialized" and executed one by one. The code above works fine. Why this is not working instead?

 TThread.CreateAnonymousThread(
  procedure
   begin

     TThread.Queue(TThread.Current, procedure
                                          begin
                                           Memo1.Lines.Clear;
                                           Memo1.Lines.Add('start');
                                          end);

     Sleep(2000);

     TThread.Queue(TThread.Current, procedure
                                          begin
                                           Memo1.Lines.Add('end');
                                          end);

   end
 ).Start;

In this case the Memo outputs the start but not the end. When I call:

  • Synchronize on the first and Synchronize on the second it works
  • Queue on the first and Synchronize on the second it works
  • Queue both times it's not working because I see only the start in the memo
22

The difference between queue and synchronize is that Synchronize() puts the call in a queue and waits for that call to be completed and Queue() puts the call in the queue and directly returns control to the thread.

However... and this is not mentioned in the official documentation, when a thread finishes, all the calls placed in the queue with Queue(AThread, AMethod), where AThread is its own thread, are removed.

You can see that clearly in the source of TThread.Destroy() where RemoveQueuedEvents(Self) is called.

RemoveQueuedEvents removes queued method calls. [...] If AThread is specified, then all method calls queued by this thread are removed.

So directly after your last Queue() your thread ends, TThread.Destroy() is executed and that last call(s) is/are removed from the queue.

There are some things you can do to solve this.

  • Like mentioned in the comments you can call TThread.Queue(nil, AMethod). B.T.W. Calling TThread.Queue(AMethod) is the same as TThread.Queue(Self, AMethod) so you'll always need to use the nil-variant if the thread is going to end and you want the call to finish.
  • But... If you still need the thread active when executing the call (for some data from it), you'll need to block the thread from exiting. You can do that by using Synchronize() as last queue-method. Note that the last synchronize doesn't have to be a real procedure. You can just call synchronize to a dummy-procedure at the end of the TThread.Execute like Synchronize(DummySync) (example). The queue if FIFO so the thread will wait until all calls in the queue are processed (including the empty dummysync).

Some extra information can be found on these pages
Ensure all TThread.Queue methods complete before thread self-destructs
http://www.uweraabe.de/Blog/2011/01/30/synchronize-and-queue-with-parameters/

| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    This can be avoided when you give nil as the first parameter instead of TThread.Current. – Uwe Raabe Feb 16 '17 at 20:23
  • 2
    @KenWhite, although the resource is not first hand, I usually trust it :) uweraabe.de/Blog/2011/01/30/… (last paragraph). For the still non-believers: use the source. – Uwe Raabe Feb 16 '17 at 22:08
  • 1
    @RaffaeleRossi, as I mentioned in my first comment to this answer, you can use nil instead of TThread.Current to make this work with Queue as well. – Uwe Raabe Feb 16 '17 at 23:00
  • 2
    @RaffaeleRossi I can confirm that passing nil works in this situation. I do that all the time. If you specify a thread object to Queue(), the request is associated with that thread. When a thread is terminated/freed, it calls RemoveQueuedEvents() on itself, canceling any associated queued requests that have not been processed yet. Passing nil to Queue() bypasses that so the request is not canceled. – Remy Lebeau Feb 17 '17 at 0:51
  • 1
    @DavidHeffernan My apologizes for using the quote-method. I wasn't actually quoting an official source but wanted to convey a known statement about using Queue(). I did check the validity of the statement in the source (which I now included in my answer). I probably shouldn't have used the quotes though. I changed/expanded my answer. – Rik Feb 17 '17 at 9:19

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