35

I'm using ASP.NET Core, the built-in container, and MediatR 3 which supports "behavior" pipelines:

public class MyRequest : IRequest<string>
{
    // ...
}

public class MyRequestHandler : IRequestHandler<MyRequest, string>
{
    public string Handle(MyRequest message)
    {
        return "Hello!";
    }
}

public class MyPipeline<TRequest, TResponse> : IPipelineBehavior<TRequest, TResponse>
{
    public async Task<TResponse> Handle(TRequest request, RequestHandlerDelegate<TResponse> next)
    {
        var response = await next();
        return response;
    }
}

// in `Startup.ConfigureServices()`:
services.AddTransient(typeof(IPipelineBehavior<MyRequest,str‌​ing>), typeof(MyPipeline<MyRequest,string>))

I need a FluentValidation validator in the pipeline. In MediatR 2, a validation pipeline was created thus:

public class ValidationPipeline<TRequest, TResponse>
    : IRequestHandler<TRequest, TResponse>
    where TRequest : IRequest<TResponse>
{

    public ValidationPipeline(IRequestHandler<TRequest, TResponse> inner, IEnumerable<IValidator<TRequest>> validators)
    {
        _inner = inner;
        _validators = validators;
    }

    public TResponse Handle(TRequest message)
    {
        var failures = _validators
            .Select(v => v.Validate(message))
            .SelectMany(result => result.Errors)
            .Where(f => f != null)
            .ToList();
        if (failures.Any())
            throw new ValidationException(failures);
        return _inner.Handle(request);
    }

}

How do I do that now for the new version? How do I set which validator to use?

3 Answers 3

32

The process is exactly the same, you just have to change the interface to use the new IPipelineBehavior<TRequest, TResponse> interface.

public class ValidationBehavior<TRequest, TResponse> : IPipelineBehavior<TRequest, TResponse>
    where TRequest : IRequest<TResponse>
{
    private readonly IEnumerable<IValidator<TRequest>> _validators;

    public ValidationBehavior(IEnumerable<IValidator<TRequest>> validators)
    {
        _validators = validators;
    }

    public Task<TResponse> Handle(TRequest request, RequestHandlerDelegate<TResponse> next)
    {
        var context = new ValidationContext(request);
        var failures = _validators
            .Select(v => v.Validate(context))
            .SelectMany(result => result.Errors)
            .Where(f => f != null)
            .ToList();

        if (failures.Count != 0)
        {
            throw new ValidationException(failures);
        }

        return next();
    }
}

For the validators, you should register all the validators as IValidator<TRequest> in the built-in container so they'll be injected in the behavior. If you don't want to register them one by one, I suggest that you have a look at the great Scrutor library that brings assembly scanning capabilities. This way it'll find your validators itself.

Also, with the new system, you don't use the decorator pattern anymore, you just register your generic behavior in the container and MediatR will pick it up automatically. It could look something like:

var services = new ServiceCollection();
services.AddMediatR(typeof(Program));
services.AddTransient(typeof(IPipelineBehavior<,>), typeof(ValidationBehavior<,>));
var provider = services.BuildServiceProvider();
17
  • 1
    One thing I don't get (though I know I can register a specific type as you helped me figure out in that other question), why do all examples for this stuff use open generics for registration? Surely you need a pipeline for a specific set of requests, handlers, etc., and not have every pipeline run for every request?
    – grokky
    Feb 17, 2017 at 9:27
  • 1
    I guess it depends. I'm happy having the validation behavior applied to all requests, for example. Worst case scenario, no validators have been registered for this specific request and it becomes a no-op that just delegates to the next behavior or the actual request handler. Keeping them generic makes the registration much more straightforward, too. Thanks for reporting the issue, I took that from some code that used Autofac, the built-in container in ASP.NET Core might not support arrays. Feb 17, 2017 at 10:43
  • 9
    Exceptions are not free. This is a terrible design.
    – DarthVader
    Nov 29, 2018 at 20:51
  • 4
    Despite the terse delivery, I tend to agree with Lord Vader. I'm trying to achieve validation in my pipeline without throwing exceptions. From a design perspective, I can't sign on to the notion that a business validation failure should result in an exception. It's easy to implement, but it just feels wrong. There's gotta be a better way. I'll look at adding properties to the IResponse, which may require either casting, reflection or both, given the open generic types in the pipeline handler. Sep 12, 2019 at 22:28
  • 2
    @RahulDass Yeah. This article nails it medium.com/the-cloud-builders-guild/… All the best! May 15, 2021 at 6:52
9

I've packed .net core integration into nuget, feel free to use it: https://www.nuget.org/packages/MediatR.Extensions.FluentValidation.AspNetCore

Just insert in configuration section:

services.AddFluentValidation(new[] {typeof(GenerateInvoiceHandler).GetTypeInfo().Assembly});

GitHub

1
2

On the new version (MediatR (>= 9.0.0)) you can do something like this:

public class ValidationBehavior<TRequest, TResponse> : IPipelineBehavior<TRequest, TResponse> where TRequest : IRequest<TResponse>
{
    private readonly IEnumerable<IValidator<TRequest>> _validators;

    public ValidationBehavior(IEnumerable<IValidator<TRequest>> validators)
    {
        _validators = validators;
    }

    public Task<TResponse> Handle(TRequest request, CancellationToken cancellationToken, RequestHandlerDelegate<TResponse> next)
    {
        var context = new ValidationContext<TRequest>(request);
        var failures = _validators
            .Select(v => v.Validate(context))
            .SelectMany(result => result.Errors)
            .Where(f => f != null)
            .ToList();

        if (failures.Count != 0)
        {
            throw new ValidationException(failures);
        }

        return next();
    }
}

Remember to add var context = new ValidationContext<TRequest>(request); in previous version like FluentApi 8.0 or below it used something like this var context = new ValidationContext(request);

for Register in Asp.Net Core in under IServiceCollection wright below code:

services.AddMediatR(Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly());
services.AddTransient(typeof(IPipelineBehavior<,>), typeof(ValidationBehavior<,>));

Hope that's helpful!

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